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Home / OUR TREES / Trees in clearance sale

Trees in clearance sale

Adam's needle Adam's needle
Adam's needle

REDUCED PRICE

Yucca filamentosa is a species of flowering plant in the family Asparagaceae native to the southeastern United States as far west as Louisiana, and along the East Coast from central Florida to southeast Virginia. They have become naturalized north along the East Coast to coastal Rhode Island and into parts of the lower Midwest. They are normally hardy in USDA hardiness zones of 4b to 9. Most commonly found in sandy soils, especially in beach scrub and dunes, but also in fields, barrens, and rocky slopes, though it grows well also in silt or clay soils. Its common names include Adam's needle, common yucca, Spanish bayonet, bear-grass, needle-palm, silk-grass, and spoon-leaf yucca.

Usually trunkless, it is a multisuckering evergreen shrub with heads of 75 cm (30 in) long, filamentous, blue-green, strappy leaves. It is fully hardy, though in cultivation it benefits from a sheltered position away from winter winds. Y. filamentosa is readily distinguished from other yucca species by white, thready filaments along the leaf margins. Flower stems up to 3 m (10 ft) tall bear masses of pendulous cream flowers in early summer.

Y. filamentosa is widely cultivated in mild temperate and subtropical climates as a broadleaved evergreen plant. It needs full sun and a well-drained soil, preferring an acid or slightly alkaline pH range of 5.5 to 7.5. It develops a large, fleshy, white taproot with deep large lateral roots. Once planted and established, it is difficult to remove it as the deep roots keep sending up new shoots for many years.

REDUCED PRICE

Yucca filamentosa is a species of flowering plant in the family Asparagaceae native to the southeastern United States as far west as Louisiana, and along the East Coast from central Florida to southeast Virginia. They have become naturalized north along the East Coast to coastal Rhode Island and into parts of the lower Midwest. They are normally hardy in USDA hardiness zones of 4b to 9. Most commonly found in sandy soils, especially in beach scrub and dunes, but also in fields, barrens, and rocky slopes, though it grows well also in silt or clay soils. Its common names include Adam's needle, common yucca, Spanish bayonet, bear-grass, needle-palm, silk-grass, and spoon-leaf yucca.

Usually trunkless, it is a multisuckering evergreen shrub with heads of 75 cm (30 in) long, filamentous, blue-green, strappy leaves. It is fully hardy, though in cultivation it benefits from a sheltered position away from winter winds. Y. filamentosa is readily distinguished from other yucca species by white, thready filaments along the leaf margins. Flower stems up to 3 m (10 ft) tall bear masses of pendulous cream flowers in early summer.

Y. filamentosa is widely cultivated in mild temperate and subtropical climates as a broadleaved evergreen plant. It needs full sun and a well-drained soil, preferring an acid or slightly alkaline pH range of 5.5 to 7.5. It develops a large, fleshy, white taproot with deep large lateral roots. Once planted and established, it is difficult to remove it as the deep roots keep sending up new shoots for many years.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Bitternut Hickory, Carya cordiformis Bitternut Hickory, Carya cordiformis
Bitternut Hickory, Carya cordiformis

Carya cordiformis, the Bitternut Hickory,  is a large pecan hickory. It is the shortest lived of the hickories, living to about 200 years. It is a large deciduous tree, growing up to 35 meters tall (exceptionally to 47 m), with a trunk up to 1 m diameter. The leaves are 15-30 cm long, pinnate, with 7-11 leaflets, each leaflet lanceolate, 7-13 cm long, with the apical leaflets the largest but only slightly so. It is closely related to the Pecan, sharing similar leaf shape and being classified in the same section of the genus Carya sect. Apocarya, but unlike the Pecan, it does not have edible nuts. It is most readily distinguished from the Pecan by the smaller number of leaflets, with many leaves having only 7 leaflets (rarely fewer than 9, and often 11-13, in the Pecan). Bitternut hickory grows in moist mountain valleys along streambanks and in swamps. Although it is usually found on wet bottom lands, it grows on dry sites and also grows well on poor soils low in nutrients.

Bitternut is used for lumber and pulpwood. This is also a good tree for increasing the value of your woodlot like the oaks do. Because bitternut hickory wood is hard and durable, it is used for furniture, paneling, dowels, tool handles and ladders. Like other hickories, the wood is used for smoking meat, and by Native Americans for making bows. Bitternut hickory seeds and its bark are eaten by wildlife.

Carya cordiformis, the Bitternut Hickory,  is a large pecan hickory. It is the shortest lived of the hickories, living to about 200 years. It is a large deciduous tree, growing up to 35 meters tall (exceptionally to 47 m), with a trunk up to 1 m diameter. The leaves are 15-30 cm long, pinnate, with 7-11 leaflets, each leaflet lanceolate, 7-13 cm long, with the apical leaflets the largest but only slightly so. It is closely related to the Pecan, sharing similar leaf shape and being classified in the same section of the genus Carya sect. Apocarya, but unlike the Pecan, it does not have edible nuts. It is most readily distinguished from the Pecan by the smaller number of leaflets, with many leaves having only 7 leaflets (rarely fewer than 9, and often 11-13, in the Pecan). Bitternut hickory grows in moist mountain valleys along streambanks and in swamps. Although it is usually found on wet bottom lands, it grows on dry sites and also grows well on poor soils low in nutrients.

Bitternut is used for lumber and pulpwood. This is also a good tree for increasing the value of your woodlot like the oaks do. Because bitternut hickory wood is hard and durable, it is used for furniture, paneling, dowels, tool handles and ladders. Like other hickories, the wood is used for smoking meat, and by Native Americans for making bows. Bitternut hickory seeds and its bark are eaten by wildlife.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Black Locust, Robinia Pseudoacacia Black Locust, Robinia Pseudoacacia
Black Locust, Robinia Pseudoacacia

Reduced price AT MAXIMUM

Robinia pseudoacacia, commonly known as the black locust, is a tree of the genus Robinia of the pea family Fabaceae. It is native to the southeastern United States, but has been widely planted and naturalized elsewhere in temperate North America, Europe, Southern Africa and Asia and is considered an invasive specie in some areas. With a trunk up to 0.8 m diameter (exceptionally up to 52 m tall and 1.6 m diameter in very old trees), with thick, deeply furrowed blackish bark. The leaves are 10–25 cm long, pinnate with 9–19 oval leaflets, 2–5 cm long and 1.5–3 cm broad. Each leaf usually has a pair of short spines at the base, 1–2 mm long or absent on adult crown shoots, up to 2 cm long on vigorous young plants. The intensely fragrant (reminiscent of orange blossoms) flowers are white to lavender or purple, borne in pendulous racemes 8–20 cm long, and are edible. Wood: pale yellowish brown; heavy, hard, strong, close-grained and very durable in contact with the ground. The wood has a specific gravity 0.7333, and a weight of approximately 45.7 pounds per cubic foot.

Black locust is a major honey plant in the eastern US, and, having been taken and planted in France, Italy and other European nations. Black locust has nitrogen-fixing bacteria on its root system; for this reason it can grow on poor soils and is an early colonizer of disturbed areas. This is an excellent tree to add in a permaculture system as well as shelterbed and for ornamental in parks and streets. Suitable for zone 4b.

Reduced price AT MAXIMUM

Robinia pseudoacacia, commonly known as the black locust, is a tree of the genus Robinia of the pea family Fabaceae. It is native to the southeastern United States, but has been widely planted and naturalized elsewhere in temperate North America, Europe, Southern Africa and Asia and is considered an invasive specie in some areas. With a trunk up to 0.8 m diameter (exceptionally up to 52 m tall and 1.6 m diameter in very old trees), with thick, deeply furrowed blackish bark. The leaves are 10–25 cm long, pinnate with 9–19 oval leaflets, 2–5 cm long and 1.5–3 cm broad. Each leaf usually has a pair of short spines at the base, 1–2 mm long or absent on adult crown shoots, up to 2 cm long on vigorous young plants. The intensely fragrant (reminiscent of orange blossoms) flowers are white to lavender or purple, borne in pendulous racemes 8–20 cm long, and are edible. Wood: pale yellowish brown; heavy, hard, strong, close-grained and very durable in contact with the ground. The wood has a specific gravity 0.7333, and a weight of approximately 45.7 pounds per cubic foot.

Black locust is a major honey plant in the eastern US, and, having been taken and planted in France, Italy and other European nations. Black locust has nitrogen-fixing bacteria on its root system; for this reason it can grow on poor soils and is an early colonizer of disturbed areas. This is an excellent tree to add in a permaculture system as well as shelterbed and for ornamental in parks and streets. Suitable for zone 4b.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Black Walnut non-selected Black Walnut non-selected
Black Walnut non-selected

This Black walnut is not selected and is recommended for timber. The nuts are small to medium size. Suitable for zone 3b

See the PDF fact sheet for spacing requirements when you want timber production or nuts production.

 

This Black walnut is not selected and is recommended for timber. The nuts are small to medium size. Suitable for zone 3b

See the PDF fact sheet for spacing requirements when you want timber production or nuts production.

 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Bur Oak,  Quercus Macrocarpa Bur Oak,  Quercus Macrocarpa
Bur Oak, Quercus Macrocarpa

DISCOUNT. WE MUST SALE THEM ALL!

The Bur oak, is a specie of oak in the white oak section Quercus sect. Quercus, native to North America in the eastern and midwestern United States and south-central Canada. This plant is also called Mossycup oak and Mossycup white oak.

It is a large deciduous tree growing up to 30 m (100 ft), rarely 40 m (130 ft), in height, and is one of the most massive oaks with a trunk diameter up to 3 m (10 ft); reports of taller trees occur, but have not been verified. It is a medium grower oak, with a growth rate of 35 cm (1 ft) per year when young. A 20-year-old tree will be about 6 m (20 ft) tall. It commonly lives to be 200 to 300 years old, and may live up to 400 years. The bark is a medium gray and somewhat rugged.

The acorns are very large (probably the largest or the oak group), 2–5 cm (0.8–2 in) long and 2–4 cm (0.8-1.5 in) broad, having a large cup that wraps much of the way around the nut, with large overlapping scales and often a fringe at the edge of the cup. Bur oak is sometimes confused with Overcup oak and White oak, both of which it occasionally hybridizes with. Bur oak is cultivated by plant nurseries for use in gardens, parks, and as a street tree. Bur oak makes an outstanding ornamental tree. Among the white oaks, it is one of the most tolerant of urban conditions, and is one of the fastest-growing of the group. It has been planted in many climates.

DISCOUNT. WE MUST SALE THEM ALL!

The Bur oak, is a specie of oak in the white oak section Quercus sect. Quercus, native to North America in the eastern and midwestern United States and south-central Canada. This plant is also called Mossycup oak and Mossycup white oak.

It is a large deciduous tree growing up to 30 m (100 ft), rarely 40 m (130 ft), in height, and is one of the most massive oaks with a trunk diameter up to 3 m (10 ft); reports of taller trees occur, but have not been verified. It is a medium grower oak, with a growth rate of 35 cm (1 ft) per year when young. A 20-year-old tree will be about 6 m (20 ft) tall. It commonly lives to be 200 to 300 years old, and may live up to 400 years. The bark is a medium gray and somewhat rugged.

The acorns are very large (probably the largest or the oak group), 2–5 cm (0.8–2 in) long and 2–4 cm (0.8-1.5 in) broad, having a large cup that wraps much of the way around the nut, with large overlapping scales and often a fringe at the edge of the cup. Bur oak is sometimes confused with Overcup oak and White oak, both of which it occasionally hybridizes with. Bur oak is cultivated by plant nurseries for use in gardens, parks, and as a street tree. Bur oak makes an outstanding ornamental tree. Among the white oaks, it is one of the most tolerant of urban conditions, and is one of the fastest-growing of the group. It has been planted in many climates.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Butternut,  Juglans cinerea Butternut,  Juglans cinerea
Butternut, Juglans cinerea

WE MUST SALE THEM ALL ! Write us if you want a quote for bulk price.

Butternut is a deciduous tree growing to 20 meters (66 ft) tall, rarely 40 meters (130 ft). Butternut is a moderate-growing specie, and rarely lives longer than 75 years. It has a 40–80 cm stem diameter, with light gray bark. The leaves are pinnate, 40–70 cm long, with 11–17 leaflets, each leaflet 5–10 cm long and 3–5 cm broad. The whole leaf is downy-pubescent, and a somewhat brighter, yellower green than many other tree leaves.The native butternut, also known as white walnut, is the hardiest member of the walnut family. It is found throughout Southern Quebec and Ontario. Even though it has similar timber qualities to the black walnut, it is prized also as a carving wood.

When the green husk is removed, it reveals an oval dark brown shell with deep longitudinal ridges. The kernel is often caught in the shell cavities making the meat difficult to remove. Grafted cultivars have been selected for cracking quality. The butternut is very susceptible to the fungus disease Sirococcus claviginenti-juglandacearum, that causes cankers and open oozing wounds in the trunk, eventually killing the tree. It is estimated that over 90% of the trees in North America are infected. It is believed that the disease was introduced from offshore. The tree has been placed on the endangered list. It is believed that some trees are resistant to this disease. It may be possible to save this species through breeding.

The butternut leafs out and blooms at about the same time as heartnut, Persian walnut and Manchurian walnut. As a result it crosses readily with them. Along with hybrid vigor, low fertility and disease resistance, the crosses often exhibit the hardiness of the butternut and unfortunately the thick shell and poor cracking quality of the parents. Very few good hybrids have been identified. Only heartnut so far has made a noteworthy cross. They are termed buartnuts, the "bu" from butternut and the "artnut" from heartnut. Mitchell, from Scotland, Ontario is the best buartnut found to date. It is a productive tree having a nut shaped like a heartnut with the rough shell and hardiness of the butternut. This area in breeding has largely been neglected. It should be possible to extend the range of the heartnut through breeding with the butternut and existing buartnuts like the Mitchell.

Our Butternut seedlings come from 2 big trees (almost 3 feet in diameter) with no trace of Canker. We think that the parents tree may carry a very good resistance of the canker. We decided to produce our Butternut from those 2 parents. We have thousands of them available.

WE MUST SALE THEM ALL ! Write us if you want a quote for bulk price.

Butternut is a deciduous tree growing to 20 meters (66 ft) tall, rarely 40 meters (130 ft). Butternut is a moderate-growing specie, and rarely lives longer than 75 years. It has a 40–80 cm stem diameter, with light gray bark. The leaves are pinnate, 40–70 cm long, with 11–17 leaflets, each leaflet 5–10 cm long and 3–5 cm broad. The whole leaf is downy-pubescent, and a somewhat brighter, yellower green than many other tree leaves.The native butternut, also known as white walnut, is the hardiest member of the walnut family. It is found throughout Southern Quebec and Ontario. Even though it has similar timber qualities to the black walnut, it is prized also as a carving wood.

When the green husk is removed, it reveals an oval dark brown shell with deep longitudinal ridges. The kernel is often caught in the shell cavities making the meat difficult to remove. Grafted cultivars have been selected for cracking quality. The butternut is very susceptible to the fungus disease Sirococcus claviginenti-juglandacearum, that causes cankers and open oozing wounds in the trunk, eventually killing the tree. It is estimated that over 90% of the trees in North America are infected. It is believed that the disease was introduced from offshore. The tree has been placed on the endangered list. It is believed that some trees are resistant to this disease. It may be possible to save this species through breeding.

The butternut leafs out and blooms at about the same time as heartnut, Persian walnut and Manchurian walnut. As a result it crosses readily with them. Along with hybrid vigor, low fertility and disease resistance, the crosses often exhibit the hardiness of the butternut and unfortunately the thick shell and poor cracking quality of the parents. Very few good hybrids have been identified. Only heartnut so far has made a noteworthy cross. They are termed buartnuts, the "bu" from butternut and the "artnut" from heartnut. Mitchell, from Scotland, Ontario is the best buartnut found to date. It is a productive tree having a nut shaped like a heartnut with the rough shell and hardiness of the butternut. This area in breeding has largely been neglected. It should be possible to extend the range of the heartnut through breeding with the butternut and existing buartnuts like the Mitchell.

Our Butternut seedlings come from 2 big trees (almost 3 feet in diameter) with no trace of Canker. We think that the parents tree may carry a very good resistance of the canker. We decided to produce our Butternut from those 2 parents. We have thousands of them available.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Chinese wingnut, Pterocarya stenoptera Chinese wingnut, Pterocarya stenoptera
Chinese wingnut, Pterocarya stenoptera

Reduced price

Pterocarya stenoptera (English: Chinese wingnut is a small-winged wingnut tree of the Juglandaceae family. It is originally from Southeast China. Pterocarya stenoptera is quite similar to P. fraxinifolia. The major difference lies in the shape of the wings on the fruit: reminiscent of the wings of the common fly, they are connected to the two sides of the walnut shaped fruit, which is about the size of a chickpea. The wings lie in two different planes.

The fruits develop in the summer on 25 cm long catkins, hanging from the distinctly differently textured green foliage. The fruiting catkins are frequently considered desirable from a landscaping perspective. The foliage is dense, though it can be thinned by pruning. The alternate deciduous leaves are pinnately compound, bearing odd numbers of elliptic-oblong pinnately-veined leaflets with serrate margins.  The bark on the trunk is similar to P. fraxinifolia, but is smoother.

The tree grows rapidly under optimal conditions, easily reaching 21 m or 70 feet with substantial spreading branches. This tree as being appropriate in zones 4b-5a.

 

Reduced price

Pterocarya stenoptera (English: Chinese wingnut is a small-winged wingnut tree of the Juglandaceae family. It is originally from Southeast China. Pterocarya stenoptera is quite similar to P. fraxinifolia. The major difference lies in the shape of the wings on the fruit: reminiscent of the wings of the common fly, they are connected to the two sides of the walnut shaped fruit, which is about the size of a chickpea. The wings lie in two different planes.

The fruits develop in the summer on 25 cm long catkins, hanging from the distinctly differently textured green foliage. The fruiting catkins are frequently considered desirable from a landscaping perspective. The foliage is dense, though it can be thinned by pruning. The alternate deciduous leaves are pinnately compound, bearing odd numbers of elliptic-oblong pinnately-veined leaflets with serrate margins.  The bark on the trunk is similar to P. fraxinifolia, but is smoother.

The tree grows rapidly under optimal conditions, easily reaching 21 m or 70 feet with substantial spreading branches. This tree as being appropriate in zones 4b-5a.

 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
English oak, Quercus Robur English oak, Quercus Robur
English oak, Quercus Robur

REDUCED PRICE AT THE MAXIMUM. LARGE QUANTITIES AVAILABLE

English oak is a majestic tree with a very wide spreading crown, a short sturdy trunk, and deeply fissured gray brown bark. It can grow up to 140 ft (40 m) tall with a rounded spread of 80 ft (24 m) or more, but is usually smaller in cultivation. English oak has small deciduous leaves, 3-5 in (7.6-12.7 cm) long, with 3-7 pairs of rounded lobes, and extremely short petioles (leaf stems). They remain deep green long into autumn before turning brown and then persisting on the tree well into winter. The typical oak flowers are hanging catkins which appear with the emerging leaves in early spring. The acorns are elongate, about 1 in (2.5 cm) long, with a cup that covers 1/3 of the nut. They are borne singly or in clusters of 2-5 which dangle on a single long 1-4 in (5.1-10.2 cm) peduncle. Recommended for plantation in parks, streets and also for windbreak. Suitable for zone 4b

REDUCED PRICE AT THE MAXIMUM. LARGE QUANTITIES AVAILABLE

English oak is a majestic tree with a very wide spreading crown, a short sturdy trunk, and deeply fissured gray brown bark. It can grow up to 140 ft (40 m) tall with a rounded spread of 80 ft (24 m) or more, but is usually smaller in cultivation. English oak has small deciduous leaves, 3-5 in (7.6-12.7 cm) long, with 3-7 pairs of rounded lobes, and extremely short petioles (leaf stems). They remain deep green long into autumn before turning brown and then persisting on the tree well into winter. The typical oak flowers are hanging catkins which appear with the emerging leaves in early spring. The acorns are elongate, about 1 in (2.5 cm) long, with a cup that covers 1/3 of the nut. They are borne singly or in clusters of 2-5 which dangle on a single long 1-4 in (5.1-10.2 cm) peduncle. Recommended for plantation in parks, streets and also for windbreak. Suitable for zone 4b

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Field Maple, Acer capestre Field Maple, Acer capestre
Field Maple, Acer capestre

Price reduced

Acer campestre, common name field maple, is a maple native to most of Europe. It is a deciduous tree reaching 15–25 metres (49–82 ft) tall, with a trunk up to 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) in diameter, with finely fissured, often somewhat corky bark. The shoots are brown, with dark brown winter buds. The field maple is widely grown as an ornamental tree in parks and large gardens. The wood is white, hard and strong, and used for furniture, flooring, wood turning and musical instruments, though the small size of the tree and its relatively slow growth make it an unimportant wood. It is locally naturalised in parts of the United States but not in Canada yet. Suitable for zone 4b.

Price reduced

Acer campestre, common name field maple, is a maple native to most of Europe. It is a deciduous tree reaching 15–25 metres (49–82 ft) tall, with a trunk up to 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) in diameter, with finely fissured, often somewhat corky bark. The shoots are brown, with dark brown winter buds. The field maple is widely grown as an ornamental tree in parks and large gardens. The wood is white, hard and strong, and used for furniture, flooring, wood turning and musical instruments, though the small size of the tree and its relatively slow growth make it an unimportant wood. It is locally naturalised in parts of the United States but not in Canada yet. Suitable for zone 4b.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Northern catalpa, Catalpa Speciosa Northern catalpa, Catalpa Speciosa
Northern catalpa, Catalpa Speciosa

Price has been reduced AGAIN

Catalpa speciosa, commonly known as the northern catalpa, is a specie of Catalpa native to the midwestern United States. Suitable for ornamental plantation in zone 4b. It is a medium-sized, deciduous tree growing to 15–30 meters tall and 12 meters wide. It has a trunk up to 1 m diameter where there is an optimal climate zone, with brown to gray bark maturing into hard plates or ridges. The leaves are deciduous, opposite (or whorled), large, heart shaped, 20–30 cm long and 15–20 cm broad, pointed at the tip and softly hairy beneath. The flowers are 3–6 cm across, trumpet shaped, white with yellow stripes and purple spots inside; they grow in panicles of 10-30.

The catalpa tree is the last tree to grow leaves in the spring. The leaves generally do not color in autumn before falling, instead, they either fall abruptly after the first hard freeze, or turn a slightly yellow-brown before dropping off. The winter twigs of northern catalpa are like those of few other trees, having sunken leaf scars that resemble suction cups. Their whorled arrangement (three scars per node) around the twigs is another diagnostic.

The fruit is a long, thin legume-like pod, 20–40 cm long and 10–12 mm diameter; it often stays attached to the tree during winter (and can be mistaken for brown icicles). The pod contains numerous flat, light brown seeds with two papery wings. It is closely related to southern catalpa, and can be distinguished by the flowering panicles, which bear a smaller number of larger flowers, and the slightly broader seed pods. The wood is soft, like white pine, and light, weighing only 26 pounds per cubic foot when dry. It also does not rot easily.

Price has been reduced AGAIN

Catalpa speciosa, commonly known as the northern catalpa, is a specie of Catalpa native to the midwestern United States. Suitable for ornamental plantation in zone 4b. It is a medium-sized, deciduous tree growing to 15–30 meters tall and 12 meters wide. It has a trunk up to 1 m diameter where there is an optimal climate zone, with brown to gray bark maturing into hard plates or ridges. The leaves are deciduous, opposite (or whorled), large, heart shaped, 20–30 cm long and 15–20 cm broad, pointed at the tip and softly hairy beneath. The flowers are 3–6 cm across, trumpet shaped, white with yellow stripes and purple spots inside; they grow in panicles of 10-30.

The catalpa tree is the last tree to grow leaves in the spring. The leaves generally do not color in autumn before falling, instead, they either fall abruptly after the first hard freeze, or turn a slightly yellow-brown before dropping off. The winter twigs of northern catalpa are like those of few other trees, having sunken leaf scars that resemble suction cups. Their whorled arrangement (three scars per node) around the twigs is another diagnostic.

The fruit is a long, thin legume-like pod, 20–40 cm long and 10–12 mm diameter; it often stays attached to the tree during winter (and can be mistaken for brown icicles). The pod contains numerous flat, light brown seeds with two papery wings. It is closely related to southern catalpa, and can be distinguished by the flowering panicles, which bear a smaller number of larger flowers, and the slightly broader seed pods. The wood is soft, like white pine, and light, weighing only 26 pounds per cubic foot when dry. It also does not rot easily.

Sizes:
Red Mulberry, Morus Rubra Red Mulberry, Morus Rubra
Red Mulberry, Morus Rubra

Morus rubra, commonly known as the Red Mulberry, is a specie of mulberry native to eastern North America. It is found from Ontario and Vermont in the north down to southern Florida, and west to southeast South Dakota and central Texas. Red Mulberry is a deciduous tree, growing to 10–15 m tall, rarely 20 m, with a trunk up to 50 cm diameter. The leaves are alternate, 7–14 cm long and 6–12 cm broad, simple, broadly cordate, with a shallow notch at the base, typically unlobed on mature trees although often with 2-3 lobes, particularly on young trees, and with a finely serrated margin. The flowers are relatively inconspicuous: small, yellowish green or reddish green, and opening as leaves emerge. Male and female flowers are usually on separate trees although they may occur on the same tree.

The fruit is a compound cluster of several small drupes, similar in appearance to a blackberry, 2–3 cm long, when it is ripening it is red or dark purple, edible and very sweet with a good flavor. The first English colonists to explore eastern Virginia in 1607 mentioned the abundance of both mulberry trees and their fruit, which was eaten, sometimes boiled, by the native Powhatan tribes. Today, mulberries are eaten raw, used in fruit pastries, and fermented into wine. The wood may be dried and used for smoking meats with a flavor that is mild and sweet. Suitable for zone 4b. Excellent tree for permaculture projects.

Morus rubra, commonly known as the Red Mulberry, is a specie of mulberry native to eastern North America. It is found from Ontario and Vermont in the north down to southern Florida, and west to southeast South Dakota and central Texas. Red Mulberry is a deciduous tree, growing to 10–15 m tall, rarely 20 m, with a trunk up to 50 cm diameter. The leaves are alternate, 7–14 cm long and 6–12 cm broad, simple, broadly cordate, with a shallow notch at the base, typically unlobed on mature trees although often with 2-3 lobes, particularly on young trees, and with a finely serrated margin. The flowers are relatively inconspicuous: small, yellowish green or reddish green, and opening as leaves emerge. Male and female flowers are usually on separate trees although they may occur on the same tree.

The fruit is a compound cluster of several small drupes, similar in appearance to a blackberry, 2–3 cm long, when it is ripening it is red or dark purple, edible and very sweet with a good flavor. The first English colonists to explore eastern Virginia in 1607 mentioned the abundance of both mulberry trees and their fruit, which was eaten, sometimes boiled, by the native Powhatan tribes. Today, mulberries are eaten raw, used in fruit pastries, and fermented into wine. The wood may be dried and used for smoking meats with a flavor that is mild and sweet. Suitable for zone 4b. Excellent tree for permaculture projects.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Swamp white Oak, Quercus Bicolor Swamp white Oak, Quercus Bicolor
Swamp white Oak, Quercus Bicolor

SIZE OF 3-4 FEET WITH DISCOUNT OF 50 %. WE MUST SALE THEM ALL!

The swamp white oak, is a medium-sized tree of America's north central and northeastern mixed forests. It has a very large range, and can survive in a variety of habitats including wet soil. It is not found where flooding is permanent, although it is usually found in broad stream valleys, low-lying fields, and the margins of lakes, ponds, or sloughs. It grows rapidly and can reach 300 to 350 years. It is not a large tree, typically growing to 20-25m.

It is one of the more important white oaks for lumber production. In recent years, the swamp white oak has become a popular landscaping tree, partly due to its relative ease of transplanting.

SIZE OF 3-4 FEET WITH DISCOUNT OF 50 %. WE MUST SALE THEM ALL!

The swamp white oak, is a medium-sized tree of America's north central and northeastern mixed forests. It has a very large range, and can survive in a variety of habitats including wet soil. It is not found where flooding is permanent, although it is usually found in broad stream valleys, low-lying fields, and the margins of lakes, ponds, or sloughs. It grows rapidly and can reach 300 to 350 years. It is not a large tree, typically growing to 20-25m.

It is one of the more important white oaks for lumber production. In recent years, the swamp white oak has become a popular landscaping tree, partly due to its relative ease of transplanting.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Sycamore, Platanus Occidentalis Sycamore, Platanus Occidentalis
Sycamore, Platanus Occidentalis

On Sale, very low price

Seeds source: from a 45 feet tree in zone 4b . Quebec, Canada. Very hardy source

A sycamore can grow to massive proportions, typically reaching up to 30 to 40 m (98 to 131 ft) high and 1.5 to 2 m (4.9 to 6.6 ft) in diameter when grown in deep soils. An American sycamore tree can often be easily distinguished from other trees by its mottled exfoliating bark which flakes off in great irregular masses, leaving the surface mottled, and greenish-white, gray and brown. The bark of all trees has to yield to a growing trunk by stretching, splitting, or infilling; the sycamore shows the process more openly than many other trees. Fruit: brown heads, solitary or rarely clustered, 2.5 cm (1 in) in diameter, hanging on slender stems three to six inches long; persistent through the winter. These heads are composed of achenes about two-thirds of an inch in length. A tree suitable for zone 4b. Excellent as street and park tree, it can tolerate urban conditions easily.
 

On Sale, very low price

Seeds source: from a 45 feet tree in zone 4b . Quebec, Canada. Very hardy source

A sycamore can grow to massive proportions, typically reaching up to 30 to 40 m (98 to 131 ft) high and 1.5 to 2 m (4.9 to 6.6 ft) in diameter when grown in deep soils. An American sycamore tree can often be easily distinguished from other trees by its mottled exfoliating bark which flakes off in great irregular masses, leaving the surface mottled, and greenish-white, gray and brown. The bark of all trees has to yield to a growing trunk by stretching, splitting, or infilling; the sycamore shows the process more openly than many other trees. Fruit: brown heads, solitary or rarely clustered, 2.5 cm (1 in) in diameter, hanging on slender stems three to six inches long; persistent through the winter. These heads are composed of achenes about two-thirds of an inch in length. A tree suitable for zone 4b. Excellent as street and park tree, it can tolerate urban conditions easily.
 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
table grape 'Brianna'
table grape 'Brianna'

Brianna produces large clusters of medium size sweet white grapes. It is very cold hardy and shows good fungal resistance. Brianna can be used as a good table grape and produces a nice white dessert wine. Wines are semi-sweet with pineapple nose and flavor.

Color: White
Primary Use: Wine
USDA Winter Hardiness: 3
Harvest Season: Mid Season
Growth Habit: Semi Upright
Vigor: Medium Vigor
Sugg. Distance Between Vines: 6 - 8 ft.
Bud Break: a few (2-3) days later than Concord
Bloom Date: a few (2-3) days earlier that Concord
Sulfur Injury: None Observed

Disease Susceptibility:

Black Rot: moderately susceptible or sensitive
Downy Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Powdery Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Botrytis: moderately susceptible or sensitive
Sulfur Sensitivity: slightly susceptible or sensitive

Brianna produces large clusters of medium size sweet white grapes. It is very cold hardy and shows good fungal resistance. Brianna can be used as a good table grape and produces a nice white dessert wine. Wines are semi-sweet with pineapple nose and flavor.

Color: White
Primary Use: Wine
USDA Winter Hardiness: 3
Harvest Season: Mid Season
Growth Habit: Semi Upright
Vigor: Medium Vigor
Sugg. Distance Between Vines: 6 - 8 ft.
Bud Break: a few (2-3) days later than Concord
Bloom Date: a few (2-3) days earlier that Concord
Sulfur Injury: None Observed

Disease Susceptibility:

Black Rot: moderately susceptible or sensitive
Downy Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Powdery Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Botrytis: moderately susceptible or sensitive
Sulfur Sensitivity: slightly susceptible or sensitive

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
table grape 'Kay Gray'
table grape 'Kay Gray'

Kay Gray is very productive and vines are disease resistant. Produces medium to large, very firm, white slipskin grapes with a mild foxy flavor. We eat the grapes as a fruit but Kay Gray can make a neutral white table wine, and is most commonly used for blending. Flavor varies depending on climate- from labrusca to fruity. The grapes contains seeds.It has a tropical fruit flavor like pineapple and passion fruits. SELF-FERTILE

Color: grey-white
Primary Use: Table,Basket,Dessert,Wine
USDA Winter Hardiness: 3
Harvest Season: Early Season
Growth Habit: Trailing
Vigor: Very Vigorous
Sugg. Distance Between Vines: 8 ft.
Bud Break: mid-season with Concord
Bloom Date: a few (2-3) days later than Concord
Sulfur Injury: Substantial Injury Observed in 2011

Disease Susceptibility:

Black Rot: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Downy Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Powdery Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Botrytis: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Sulfur Sensitivity: highly susceptible or sensitive

Kay Gray is very productive and vines are disease resistant. Produces medium to large, very firm, white slipskin grapes with a mild foxy flavor. We eat the grapes as a fruit but Kay Gray can make a neutral white table wine, and is most commonly used for blending. Flavor varies depending on climate- from labrusca to fruity. The grapes contains seeds.It has a tropical fruit flavor like pineapple and passion fruits. SELF-FERTILE

Color: grey-white
Primary Use: Table,Basket,Dessert,Wine
USDA Winter Hardiness: 3
Harvest Season: Early Season
Growth Habit: Trailing
Vigor: Very Vigorous
Sugg. Distance Between Vines: 8 ft.
Bud Break: mid-season with Concord
Bloom Date: a few (2-3) days later than Concord
Sulfur Injury: Substantial Injury Observed in 2011

Disease Susceptibility:

Black Rot: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Downy Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Powdery Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Botrytis: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Sulfur Sensitivity: highly susceptible or sensitive

Sizes:
table grape 'Somerset'
table grape 'Somerset'

SEEDLESS varieties

Medium sized, ruddy, reddish golden berries with a crispy texture and a pleasant, surprising strawberry-like flavour. This exceptional table grape makes a delectable pink juice, as well as jams and jellies. The fruit is edible at the pink stage but becomes much sweeter and more flavourful if left until fully red. Developed in Minnesota, Somerset has proven to be the most cold hardy seedless variety. Easy to grow, very good disease resistance and not excessively vigorous. Ripens 2 1/2 weeks before concord.
SELF-FERTILE
ZONE 4

SEEDLESS varieties

Medium sized, ruddy, reddish golden berries with a crispy texture and a pleasant, surprising strawberry-like flavour. This exceptional table grape makes a delectable pink juice, as well as jams and jellies. The fruit is edible at the pink stage but becomes much sweeter and more flavourful if left until fully red. Developed in Minnesota, Somerset has proven to be the most cold hardy seedless variety. Easy to grow, very good disease resistance and not excessively vigorous. Ripens 2 1/2 weeks before concord.
SELF-FERTILE
ZONE 4

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
table grape 'Swenson white'
table grape 'Swenson white'

Also known as Louise Swenson, this essentially seedless white table grape has a delicious, fruity flavor. The vine is vigorous, cold hardy and disease resistant. This grape is also used for wine production, and has a delicate aroma of flowers and honey. It is light in body and blending it with a variety such as Prairie Star makes it a more complete wine. Ripens late August into September.
Mature Height: 6-8 ft.
Hardy to -30°F or zone 4

Also known as Louise Swenson, this essentially seedless white table grape has a delicious, fruity flavor. The vine is vigorous, cold hardy and disease resistant. This grape is also used for wine production, and has a delicate aroma of flowers and honey. It is light in body and blending it with a variety such as Prairie Star makes it a more complete wine. Ripens late August into September.
Mature Height: 6-8 ft.
Hardy to -30°F or zone 4

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
table grape 'Trollhaugen'
table grape 'Trollhaugen'

SEEDLESS VARIETIES

The earliest and also the hardiest blue seedless grape, it can remain hanging on the vine for weeks after ripening without losing much quality. Medium-sized berries are exceptionally sweet with a mild Concord-like flavour. A real favorite for fresh eating, it also makes excellent raisins. Trollhaugen was introduced by Elmer Swenson, the renowned grape breeder from Wisconsin. The name reflects his Norwegian heritage. Ripens four weeks before Concord.
SELF-FERTILE
ZONE 4

SEEDLESS VARIETIES

The earliest and also the hardiest blue seedless grape, it can remain hanging on the vine for weeks after ripening without losing much quality. Medium-sized berries are exceptionally sweet with a mild Concord-like flavour. A real favorite for fresh eating, it also makes excellent raisins. Trollhaugen was introduced by Elmer Swenson, the renowned grape breeder from Wisconsin. The name reflects his Norwegian heritage. Ripens four weeks before Concord.
SELF-FERTILE
ZONE 4

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Yellow Catalpa, Catalpa ovata Yellow Catalpa, Catalpa ovata
Yellow Catalpa, Catalpa ovata

Reduced price

Catalpa ovata, the yellow catalpa or Chinese catalpa, is a pod-bearing tree native to China. Compared to C. speciosa, it is much smaller, typically reaching heights between 6 to 10 m (20 and 30 feet). The inflorescences form 4–10-inch-long (10–25 cm) bunches of creamy white flowers with distinctly yellow tinging; individual flowers are about 1 inch wide. They bloom in July and August.[5] The leaves are very similar in shape to those of Paulownia tomentosa, having three lobes (two are abruptly truncated on either edge, with a third, central, slightly acute, pointed lobe forming the leaf apex), and are darkly green. Fruits are very narrow, foot-long pods. Hardy to zone 4a

Reduced price

Catalpa ovata, the yellow catalpa or Chinese catalpa, is a pod-bearing tree native to China. Compared to C. speciosa, it is much smaller, typically reaching heights between 6 to 10 m (20 and 30 feet). The inflorescences form 4–10-inch-long (10–25 cm) bunches of creamy white flowers with distinctly yellow tinging; individual flowers are about 1 inch wide. They bloom in July and August.[5] The leaves are very similar in shape to those of Paulownia tomentosa, having three lobes (two are abruptly truncated on either edge, with a third, central, slightly acute, pointed lobe forming the leaf apex), and are darkly green. Fruits are very narrow, foot-long pods. Hardy to zone 4a

Sizes:
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