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You are now browsing the nursery’s’ nut tree section. For each species, you will find a short description of the tree. To find more specific details about the tree such as; the height, hardiness, flood or shade tolerance, wood characteristics and other information useful to landscaping professionals, farm and woodlot owners, click on the link to access the technical data sheet.
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Home / OUR TREES / Nut trees
Nut trees

Nut trees

Nutcracker Nursery produces various nut trees from the most northern regions. We would like to introduce you to some species we cultivate. Those trees will undoubtedly add a plus value to your landscape and with a little bit of patience, you will reap the benefits with their succulent fruits when harvesting their nuts.

 ''Simcoe'' heartnut seedlings
''Simcoe'' heartnut seedlings

'Simcoe' formerly 'Simcoe 8-2' was selected from a planting at the Simcoe Station Experimental Farm. It is a large Valentine heart shaped nut that freely drops out a mixture of whole and half nutmeats. It is an alternate bearer on a two-three year cycle with heavy and lighter crops. It is an early pollinator so is best matched with one of our 2 late pollinators. Nuts ripen 2 weeks after 'Imshu'.

source of information: grimo nut

'Simcoe' formerly 'Simcoe 8-2' was selected from a planting at the Simcoe Station Experimental Farm. It is a large Valentine heart shaped nut that freely drops out a mixture of whole and half nutmeats. It is an alternate bearer on a two-three year cycle with heavy and lighter crops. It is an early pollinator so is best matched with one of our 2 late pollinators. Nuts ripen 2 weeks after 'Imshu'.

source of information: grimo nut

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
''Campbell CW3'' heartnut seedlings
''Campbell CW3'' heartnut seedlings

'Campbell CW3' is a heavy producer of medium sized nuts. It is a more compact tree but still keeps up in production with larger more spreading trees. The nuts will crack out a mixture of halves and whole meats that drop out of the shell freely. It is an early pollinator, so it is best matched with one of our two late pollinators. Nuts ripen and begin dropping a week after 'Imshu'

source of information: Grimo nut

'Campbell CW3' is a heavy producer of medium sized nuts. It is a more compact tree but still keeps up in production with larger more spreading trees. The nuts will crack out a mixture of halves and whole meats that drop out of the shell freely. It is an early pollinator, so it is best matched with one of our two late pollinators. Nuts ripen and begin dropping a week after 'Imshu'

source of information: Grimo nut

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
''Campbell' CW1' heartnut seedlings
''Campbell' CW1' heartnut seedlings

'Campbell CW1' is a heavy producer of medium sized nuts. The nuts will crack out a mixture of halves and whole meats that drop out of the shell freely. It is a late pollinator, so it is best matched with an early pollinator. Nuts ripen and begin dropping in the last week of September

source of information: Grimo Nut

'Campbell CW1' is a heavy producer of medium sized nuts. The nuts will crack out a mixture of halves and whole meats that drop out of the shell freely. It is a late pollinator, so it is best matched with an early pollinator. Nuts ripen and begin dropping in the last week of September

source of information: Grimo Nut

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
''Imshu'' heartnut seedlings
''Imshu'' heartnut seedlings

'Imshu' is a heavy producer of medium sized nuts. With careful cracking, Imshu will crack out whole meats that drop out of the shell freely. It is a late pollinator, so it is best matched with an early pollinator. Nuts ripen and begin dropping in the last week of September.

source of information: Grimo nut nursery

'Imshu' is a heavy producer of medium sized nuts. With careful cracking, Imshu will crack out whole meats that drop out of the shell freely. It is a late pollinator, so it is best matched with an early pollinator. Nuts ripen and begin dropping in the last week of September.

source of information: Grimo nut nursery

Sizes:
186M hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)
186M hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)

This is a highly blight resistant, possibly immune, seedling of Faroka, a sister tree to 208D. The tree is large and moderately productive. The nut is large, well filled with a clean kernel. The nuts ripen at the end of September and drop clean from the husk. It has good resistance to bud mite. Suited for zones 4b and over.

This is a highly blight resistant, possibly immune, seedling of Faroka, a sister tree to 208D. The tree is large and moderately productive. The nut is large, well filled with a clean kernel. The nuts ripen at the end of September and drop clean from the husk. It has good resistance to bud mite. Suited for zones 4b and over.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
208D hazelnut tree seedling
208D hazelnut tree seedling

This is a highly blight resistant, possibly immune, seedling of Faroka. Faroka is a Turkish x European hybrid cross made by Jack Gellatly of West Bank, BC. This selection is a large, moderately productive with a tendency to biennial bearing. The nut is large, well filled with a clean kernel. The nuts ripen the last week of September and drop clean from the husk. It has good resistance to bud mite.. Suited for zones 4b and over.

This is a highly blight resistant, possibly immune, seedling of Faroka. Faroka is a Turkish x European hybrid cross made by Jack Gellatly of West Bank, BC. This selection is a large, moderately productive with a tendency to biennial bearing. The nut is large, well filled with a clean kernel. The nuts ripen the last week of September and drop clean from the husk. It has good resistance to bud mite.. Suited for zones 4b and over.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
208P hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)
208P hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)

Extra large nut, high blight resistance, moderate bearing. Suited for zones 5a and over.

Extra large nut, high blight resistance, moderate bearing. Suited for zones 5a and over.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
American Chestnut, Castanea dentata American Chestnut, Castanea dentata
American Chestnut, Castanea dentata

The American chestnut, Castanea dentata, is a very large, monoecious deciduous tree of the beech family native to eastern North America. Before the species was devastated by the chestnut blight, a fungal disease, it was one of the most important forest trees throughout its range. There are now very few mature specimens of the tree within its historical range, although many small shoots of the former live trees remain. However, there are hundreds of large (2 to 5 ft diameter) trees outside its historical range, some in areas where less virulent strains of the pathogen are more common. The american Chestnut was important for timber as well as nuts for human use as well as wildlife. A deadly fungus disease, introduced from the Orient effectively wiped out this chestnut in the first half of the 20th century.

Efforts are currently being made at Meadowview in Virginia by the American Chestnut Foundation to "bring the American chestnut back" as a forest tree again through a back cross technique using a highly fungus resistant Chinese chestnut as a source of resistance genes. After the first cross with an American chestnut is made, the progeny are screened to recover the trees that have the resistance genes. These trees are then back crossed to another American chestnut and the offspring are screened again. This process is repeated several times to "wash out" most of the Chinese chestnut genes, leaving a nearly pure American chestnut with the fungus resistance genes in place. When two of these trees with the resistance genes are subsequently crossed with each other, 100% of the offspring will inherit the resistance genes and the trees can be reintroduced to the forests. The Chinese chestnut cannot be used as a reforestation tree simply because it does not reach the height of the American native and would never be able to dominate the forest. It is hoped that this backcross tree will have the height requirement necessary. This long term project is past the half way point, with a few years to go in its program.

The american chestnut produces a small to medium size nut which has a better taste than the chinese and the European one.

Suitable for zone 4 b

 

The American chestnut, Castanea dentata, is a very large, monoecious deciduous tree of the beech family native to eastern North America. Before the species was devastated by the chestnut blight, a fungal disease, it was one of the most important forest trees throughout its range. There are now very few mature specimens of the tree within its historical range, although many small shoots of the former live trees remain. However, there are hundreds of large (2 to 5 ft diameter) trees outside its historical range, some in areas where less virulent strains of the pathogen are more common. The american Chestnut was important for timber as well as nuts for human use as well as wildlife. A deadly fungus disease, introduced from the Orient effectively wiped out this chestnut in the first half of the 20th century.

Efforts are currently being made at Meadowview in Virginia by the American Chestnut Foundation to "bring the American chestnut back" as a forest tree again through a back cross technique using a highly fungus resistant Chinese chestnut as a source of resistance genes. After the first cross with an American chestnut is made, the progeny are screened to recover the trees that have the resistance genes. These trees are then back crossed to another American chestnut and the offspring are screened again. This process is repeated several times to "wash out" most of the Chinese chestnut genes, leaving a nearly pure American chestnut with the fungus resistance genes in place. When two of these trees with the resistance genes are subsequently crossed with each other, 100% of the offspring will inherit the resistance genes and the trees can be reintroduced to the forests. The Chinese chestnut cannot be used as a reforestation tree simply because it does not reach the height of the American native and would never be able to dominate the forest. It is hoped that this backcross tree will have the height requirement necessary. This long term project is past the half way point, with a few years to go in its program.

The american chestnut produces a small to medium size nut which has a better taste than the chinese and the European one.

Suitable for zone 4 b

 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
American chinquapin (Castanea pumila)  5a American chinquapin (Castanea pumila)  5a
American chinquapin (Castanea pumila) 5a

Out of order until next fall

Castanea pumila, commonly known as the Allegheny chinquapin, American chinquapin or dwarf chestnut, is a specie of chestnut native to the central and southeastern United States. The plant's habitat is dry, sandy and rocky uplands and ridges. It grows best on well-drained soils in full sun or partial shade.

It is a spreading shrub or small tree, reaching 2 to 8 m in height at maturity. The bark is red or gray-brown and slightly furrowed into scaly plates. The leaves are simple, narrowly elliptical or lanceolate, yellow-green above and lighter and finely hairy on the underside. The fruit is a golden-colored cupule 2–3 cm in diameter with many sharp spines, maturing in autumn. Each cupule contains one ovoid shiny dark brown chestnut

The Allegheny chinkapin is closely related to the American Chestnut, Castanea dentata, and both trees can be found in the same habitat. Allegheny Chinkapin can be distinguished by its smaller nut (half the size of a chestnut) that is not flattened (chestnuts are flattened on one side). The leaves of the Allegheny Chinkapin are smaller than the American Chestnut and have less distinct teeth. Allegheny Chinkapin, however, is less susceptible to the chestnut blight fungus that devastated the American Chestnut. While the Chinkapin does blight to some degree, it continues to send out suckers that will produce fruit.

Chinquapins are used in landscapes for the purpose of attracting wildlife. When the base of the plant is cut or wounded at ground level the plant will grow multiple stalks producing a thick cover used by turkeys. The nuts are consumed by squirrels and rabbits while white tail deers graze upon the foliage.

Out of order until next fall

Castanea pumila, commonly known as the Allegheny chinquapin, American chinquapin or dwarf chestnut, is a specie of chestnut native to the central and southeastern United States. The plant's habitat is dry, sandy and rocky uplands and ridges. It grows best on well-drained soils in full sun or partial shade.

It is a spreading shrub or small tree, reaching 2 to 8 m in height at maturity. The bark is red or gray-brown and slightly furrowed into scaly plates. The leaves are simple, narrowly elliptical or lanceolate, yellow-green above and lighter and finely hairy on the underside. The fruit is a golden-colored cupule 2–3 cm in diameter with many sharp spines, maturing in autumn. Each cupule contains one ovoid shiny dark brown chestnut

The Allegheny chinkapin is closely related to the American Chestnut, Castanea dentata, and both trees can be found in the same habitat. Allegheny Chinkapin can be distinguished by its smaller nut (half the size of a chestnut) that is not flattened (chestnuts are flattened on one side). The leaves of the Allegheny Chinkapin are smaller than the American Chestnut and have less distinct teeth. Allegheny Chinkapin, however, is less susceptible to the chestnut blight fungus that devastated the American Chestnut. While the Chinkapin does blight to some degree, it continues to send out suckers that will produce fruit.

Chinquapins are used in landscapes for the purpose of attracting wildlife. When the base of the plant is cut or wounded at ground level the plant will grow multiple stalks producing a thick cover used by turkeys. The nuts are consumed by squirrels and rabbits while white tail deers graze upon the foliage.

American hazelnut, corylus americana American hazelnut, corylus americana
American hazelnut, corylus americana

A good pollinator. Ideal for northern climate region

Corylus americana, the American Hazelnut, is a specie of the genus Corylus that is native to eastern North America, in eastern Canada and the Eastern United States. The plant grows to a height of 8–12 feet, with a crown spread of 10 to 15 feet. It is a medium to large shrub that under some conditions can take the form of a small tree. It is an often multi-stemmed shrub with long, outward growing branches that form a dense, spreading or spherical shape.

American Hazelnut has edible small to medium size nuts (in certain case) that mature in September–October. The nuts are in multi cluster and have hard shell. This is a very good pollinator in spring for other varieties.

Suited for canadian climatic zone 2b and over.

A good pollinator. Ideal for northern climate region

Corylus americana, the American Hazelnut, is a specie of the genus Corylus that is native to eastern North America, in eastern Canada and the Eastern United States. The plant grows to a height of 8–12 feet, with a crown spread of 10 to 15 feet. It is a medium to large shrub that under some conditions can take the form of a small tree. It is an often multi-stemmed shrub with long, outward growing branches that form a dense, spreading or spherical shape.

American Hazelnut has edible small to medium size nuts (in certain case) that mature in September–October. The nuts are in multi cluster and have hard shell. This is a very good pollinator in spring for other varieties.

Suited for canadian climatic zone 2b and over.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Asian Hazel, Corylus heterophylla Asian Hazel, Corylus heterophylla
Asian Hazel, Corylus heterophylla

Corylus heterophylla, the Asian hazel, is a species of hazel native to eastern Asia in northern and central China, Korea, Japan, and southeastern Siberia.

It is a deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 7 m tall or 22 feet, with stems up to 20 cm thick grey bark. The flowers like all the hazelnut species are wind-pollinated catkins; the male (pollen) catkins are pale yellow, 4 cm long, while the female catkins are bright red and only 1–3 mm long. The fruit is a nut produced in clusters of 2–6 together; each nut is 0.7–1.5 cm diameter, partly enclosed in a 1.5–2.5 cm long, bract-like involucre (husk).

It is very similar to the closely related common hazel (C. avellana) of Europe and western Asia, differing in the leaves being somewhat more lobed and the size of nuts 25 % smaller. The nut (hazelnut) is edible, and is very similar to the common hazel nut; it is cultivated commercially in China

Available in September 2016.

Corylus heterophylla, the Asian hazel, is a species of hazel native to eastern Asia in northern and central China, Korea, Japan, and southeastern Siberia.

It is a deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 7 m tall or 22 feet, with stems up to 20 cm thick grey bark. The flowers like all the hazelnut species are wind-pollinated catkins; the male (pollen) catkins are pale yellow, 4 cm long, while the female catkins are bright red and only 1–3 mm long. The fruit is a nut produced in clusters of 2–6 together; each nut is 0.7–1.5 cm diameter, partly enclosed in a 1.5–2.5 cm long, bract-like involucre (husk).

It is very similar to the closely related common hazel (C. avellana) of Europe and western Asia, differing in the leaves being somewhat more lobed and the size of nuts 25 % smaller. The nut (hazelnut) is edible, and is very similar to the common hazel nut; it is cultivated commercially in China

Available in September 2016.

beaked hazel (corylus cornuta) beaked hazel (corylus cornuta)
beaked hazel (corylus cornuta)

Very hardy hazelnut. Medium pollinator to hybrid hazelnut

Beaked hazel is a deciduous shrubby hazel found in most of North America, from southern Canada south to Georgia and California. It grows in dry woodlands and forest edges and can reach 4–8 metres (13–26 ft) tall with stems 10–25 centimetres (3.9–9.8 in) thick with smooth gray bark. The leaves are rounded oval, coarsely double-toothed, 5–11 centimetres (2.0–4.3 in) long and 3–8 centimetres (1.2–3.1 in) broad, with hairy undersides. The flowers are catkins that form in the fall and pollinate in the following spring.

Corylus cornuta is named from its fruit, which is a nut enclosed in a husk with a tubular extension 2–4 centimetres (0.79–1.57 in) long that resembles a beak. Tiny filaments protrude from the husk and may stick into, and irritate, skin that contacts them. The spherical nuts, which are surrounded by a hard shell, are edible.

Very hardy hazelnut. Medium pollinator to hybrid hazelnut

Beaked hazel is a deciduous shrubby hazel found in most of North America, from southern Canada south to Georgia and California. It grows in dry woodlands and forest edges and can reach 4–8 metres (13–26 ft) tall with stems 10–25 centimetres (3.9–9.8 in) thick with smooth gray bark. The leaves are rounded oval, coarsely double-toothed, 5–11 centimetres (2.0–4.3 in) long and 3–8 centimetres (1.2–3.1 in) broad, with hairy undersides. The flowers are catkins that form in the fall and pollinate in the following spring.

Corylus cornuta is named from its fruit, which is a nut enclosed in a husk with a tubular extension 2–4 centimetres (0.79–1.57 in) long that resembles a beak. Tiny filaments protrude from the husk and may stick into, and irritate, skin that contacts them. The spherical nuts, which are surrounded by a hard shell, are edible.

Black Walnut non-selected Black Walnut non-selected
Black Walnut non-selected

This Black walnut is not selected and is recommended for timber. The nuts are small to medium size. Suitable for zone 3b

See the PDF fact sheet for spacing requirements when you want timber production or nuts production.

 

This Black walnut is not selected and is recommended for timber. The nuts are small to medium size. Suitable for zone 3b

See the PDF fact sheet for spacing requirements when you want timber production or nuts production.

 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Buartnut ''morgan'' (Juglans cinerea X Juglans ailantifolia var. cordiformis) 4b
Buartnut ''morgan'' (Juglans cinerea X Juglans ailantifolia var. cordiformis) 4b

This specie is a hybrid between butternut and heartnut but the nuts look more like the butternut with a fairly good cracking quality.

This is a full butternut canker resistant tree and ideal for climatic zone 4a.

This specie is a hybrid between butternut and heartnut but the nuts look more like the butternut with a fairly good cracking quality.

This is a full butternut canker resistant tree and ideal for climatic zone 4a.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Butternut,  Juglans cinerea Butternut,  Juglans cinerea
Butternut, Juglans cinerea

WE MUST SALE THEM ALL ! Write us if you want a quote for bulk price.

Butternut is a deciduous tree growing to 20 meters (66 ft) tall, rarely 40 meters (130 ft). Butternut is a moderate-growing specie, and rarely lives longer than 75 years. It has a 40–80 cm stem diameter, with light gray bark. The leaves are pinnate, 40–70 cm long, with 11–17 leaflets, each leaflet 5–10 cm long and 3–5 cm broad. The whole leaf is downy-pubescent, and a somewhat brighter, yellower green than many other tree leaves.The native butternut, also known as white walnut, is the hardiest member of the walnut family. It is found throughout Southern Quebec and Ontario. Even though it has similar timber qualities to the black walnut, it is prized also as a carving wood.

When the green husk is removed, it reveals an oval dark brown shell with deep longitudinal ridges. The kernel is often caught in the shell cavities making the meat difficult to remove. Grafted cultivars have been selected for cracking quality. The butternut is very susceptible to the fungus disease Sirococcus claviginenti-juglandacearum, that causes cankers and open oozing wounds in the trunk, eventually killing the tree. It is estimated that over 90% of the trees in North America are infected. It is believed that the disease was introduced from offshore. The tree has been placed on the endangered list. It is believed that some trees are resistant to this disease. It may be possible to save this species through breeding.

The butternut leafs out and blooms at about the same time as heartnut, Persian walnut and Manchurian walnut. As a result it crosses readily with them. Along with hybrid vigor, low fertility and disease resistance, the crosses often exhibit the hardiness of the butternut and unfortunately the thick shell and poor cracking quality of the parents. Very few good hybrids have been identified. Only heartnut so far has made a noteworthy cross. They are termed buartnuts, the "bu" from butternut and the "artnut" from heartnut. Mitchell, from Scotland, Ontario is the best buartnut found to date. It is a productive tree having a nut shaped like a heartnut with the rough shell and hardiness of the butternut. This area in breeding has largely been neglected. It should be possible to extend the range of the heartnut through breeding with the butternut and existing buartnuts like the Mitchell.

Our Butternut seedlings come from 2 big trees (almost 3 feet in diameter) with no trace of Canker. We think that the parents tree may carry a very good resistance of the canker. We decided to produce our Butternut from those 2 parents. We have thousands of them available.

WE MUST SALE THEM ALL ! Write us if you want a quote for bulk price.

Butternut is a deciduous tree growing to 20 meters (66 ft) tall, rarely 40 meters (130 ft). Butternut is a moderate-growing specie, and rarely lives longer than 75 years. It has a 40–80 cm stem diameter, with light gray bark. The leaves are pinnate, 40–70 cm long, with 11–17 leaflets, each leaflet 5–10 cm long and 3–5 cm broad. The whole leaf is downy-pubescent, and a somewhat brighter, yellower green than many other tree leaves.The native butternut, also known as white walnut, is the hardiest member of the walnut family. It is found throughout Southern Quebec and Ontario. Even though it has similar timber qualities to the black walnut, it is prized also as a carving wood.

When the green husk is removed, it reveals an oval dark brown shell with deep longitudinal ridges. The kernel is often caught in the shell cavities making the meat difficult to remove. Grafted cultivars have been selected for cracking quality. The butternut is very susceptible to the fungus disease Sirococcus claviginenti-juglandacearum, that causes cankers and open oozing wounds in the trunk, eventually killing the tree. It is estimated that over 90% of the trees in North America are infected. It is believed that the disease was introduced from offshore. The tree has been placed on the endangered list. It is believed that some trees are resistant to this disease. It may be possible to save this species through breeding.

The butternut leafs out and blooms at about the same time as heartnut, Persian walnut and Manchurian walnut. As a result it crosses readily with them. Along with hybrid vigor, low fertility and disease resistance, the crosses often exhibit the hardiness of the butternut and unfortunately the thick shell and poor cracking quality of the parents. Very few good hybrids have been identified. Only heartnut so far has made a noteworthy cross. They are termed buartnuts, the "bu" from butternut and the "artnut" from heartnut. Mitchell, from Scotland, Ontario is the best buartnut found to date. It is a productive tree having a nut shaped like a heartnut with the rough shell and hardiness of the butternut. This area in breeding has largely been neglected. It should be possible to extend the range of the heartnut through breeding with the butternut and existing buartnuts like the Mitchell.

Our Butternut seedlings come from 2 big trees (almost 3 feet in diameter) with no trace of Canker. We think that the parents tree may carry a very good resistance of the canker. We decided to produce our Butternut from those 2 parents. We have thousands of them available.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Chinese hazel, Corylus Chinensis Chinese hazel, Corylus Chinensis
Chinese hazel, Corylus Chinensis

Corylus chinensis, common names Chinese filbert and Chinese Hazel, is a deciduous tree native to western China. This tree is considered vulnerable due of its rarity.

Here is what we have learned about this species:

This species grows up to 24 metres tall. It has gray-brown, fissured bark, with mottled streaks. The branchlets are a purplish-brown colour, and are slender and sparsely villous.The leaves range from ovate to obovate-elliptic and have a doubly serrated, irregular margin. Corylus chinensis is found on the moist slopes of forests at altitudes ranging from 1200 and 3500 metres. It is reported from Tibet, Xinjiang, Gansu, Guizhou, Hubei, Shaanxi, Sichuan, and Yunnan. Both the oil and seeds of Corylus chinensis are edible. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil and can tolerate drought. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.

An easily grown plant, it succeeds in most soils, but is in general more productive of seeds when grown on soils of moderate fertility. It does less well in rich heavy soils or poor ones. Does well in a loamy soil. Very suitable for an alkaline soil, but it dislikes very acid soils. Plants are fairly wind tolerant. Once established, this species is drought resistant. It does not produce suckers. A very ornamental tree, it is closely allied to C. colurna. It has become very rare in China where it is considered to be at risk of extintion. Members of this genus bear transplanting well and can be easily moved even when relatively large.

Corylus chinensis, common names Chinese filbert and Chinese Hazel, is a deciduous tree native to western China. This tree is considered vulnerable due of its rarity.

Here is what we have learned about this species:

This species grows up to 24 metres tall. It has gray-brown, fissured bark, with mottled streaks. The branchlets are a purplish-brown colour, and are slender and sparsely villous.The leaves range from ovate to obovate-elliptic and have a doubly serrated, irregular margin. Corylus chinensis is found on the moist slopes of forests at altitudes ranging from 1200 and 3500 metres. It is reported from Tibet, Xinjiang, Gansu, Guizhou, Hubei, Shaanxi, Sichuan, and Yunnan. Both the oil and seeds of Corylus chinensis are edible. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil and can tolerate drought. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.

An easily grown plant, it succeeds in most soils, but is in general more productive of seeds when grown on soils of moderate fertility. It does less well in rich heavy soils or poor ones. Does well in a loamy soil. Very suitable for an alkaline soil, but it dislikes very acid soils. Plants are fairly wind tolerant. Once established, this species is drought resistant. It does not produce suckers. A very ornamental tree, it is closely allied to C. colurna. It has become very rare in China where it is considered to be at risk of extintion. Members of this genus bear transplanting well and can be easily moved even when relatively large.

Common Hazel seedling, corylus avellana Common Hazel seedling, corylus avellana
Common Hazel seedling, corylus avellana

Corylus avellana, the common hazel, is a specie of hazel native to Europe and western Asia, from the British Isles south to Iberia, Greece, Turkey and Cyprus, north to central Scandinavia, and east to the central Ural Mountains, the Caucasus, and northwestern Iran. It is an important component of the hedgerows that were the traditional field boundaries in lowland England. The wood was traditionally grown as coppice, the poles cut being used for wattle-and-daub building and agricultural fencing.

Common hazel is cultivated for its nuts. The name hazelnut applies to the nuts of any of the species of the genus Corylus. This hazelnut or cob nut, the kernel of the seed, is edible and used raw or roasted, or ground into a paste. The cob is round, compared with the longer filbert nut. Common hazel is typically a shrub reaching 3–8 m tall, but can reach 15 m. The leaves are deciduous, rounded, 6–12 cm long and across, softly hairy on both surfaces, and with a double-serrate margin. The flowers are produced very early in spring, before the leaves, and are monoecious with single-sex wind-pollinated catkins. Male catkins are pale yellow and 5–12 cm long, while female catkins are very small and largely concealed in the buds with only the bright red 1–3 mm long styles visible. The fruit is a nut, produced in clusters of one to five together, each nut held in a short leafy involucre ("husk") which encloses about three quarters of the nut. The nut is roughly spherical to oval, 15–20 mm long and 12–20 mm broad (larger, up to 25 mm long, in some cultivated selections), yellow-brown with a pale scar at the base. The nut falls out of the involucre when ripe, about 7–8 months after pollination. Suitable for zone 4b and over.

Corylus avellana, the common hazel, is a specie of hazel native to Europe and western Asia, from the British Isles south to Iberia, Greece, Turkey and Cyprus, north to central Scandinavia, and east to the central Ural Mountains, the Caucasus, and northwestern Iran. It is an important component of the hedgerows that were the traditional field boundaries in lowland England. The wood was traditionally grown as coppice, the poles cut being used for wattle-and-daub building and agricultural fencing.

Common hazel is cultivated for its nuts. The name hazelnut applies to the nuts of any of the species of the genus Corylus. This hazelnut or cob nut, the kernel of the seed, is edible and used raw or roasted, or ground into a paste. The cob is round, compared with the longer filbert nut. Common hazel is typically a shrub reaching 3–8 m tall, but can reach 15 m. The leaves are deciduous, rounded, 6–12 cm long and across, softly hairy on both surfaces, and with a double-serrate margin. The flowers are produced very early in spring, before the leaves, and are monoecious with single-sex wind-pollinated catkins. Male catkins are pale yellow and 5–12 cm long, while female catkins are very small and largely concealed in the buds with only the bright red 1–3 mm long styles visible. The fruit is a nut, produced in clusters of one to five together, each nut held in a short leafy involucre ("husk") which encloses about three quarters of the nut. The nut is roughly spherical to oval, 15–20 mm long and 12–20 mm broad (larger, up to 25 mm long, in some cultivated selections), yellow-brown with a pale scar at the base. The nut falls out of the involucre when ripe, about 7–8 months after pollination. Suitable for zone 4b and over.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
English walnut, Juglans regia English walnut, Juglans regia
English walnut, Juglans regia

The Persian walnut is the most popular walnut, grown in many parts of the world for nut production. It was used as a source of food on the ancient trade routes across Asia and then became established in China in the east and Europe in the west. From Europe, it spreaded west to North and South America as well as Australia as the "New World" was unfolded..

It is most commonly called "English" walnut, but it is also known by other names such as "Carpathian" walnut, and "California" walnut. The Carpathian walnut was introduced in Ontario in the mid 30's by Rev. Paul Crath. Convinced that the Persian walnut from the Carpathian Mountain region of his native Poland was hardy enough for Ontario conditions, he returned to Poland on several occasions and brought back several tons of "Carpathian" walnuts which were widely distributed over eastern North America. These trees have been successful as yard trees everywhere in zone 6 in Ontario, but only moderately successful as commercial trees. Persian introductions from Germany and Southern Russia have also met with the same success, while the Persians growth in California have proven to be less hardy and unsuited to our climate and shorter season.

The walnuts grown in Canada can stand -30 C and colder during the middle of winter, but a cold spell of -20 C in March could cause serious dieback. Late spring frosts in April or early May of -3 C could cause tip dieback and seriously reduce the crop which forms inside the tip buds. Due to the fickle nature of the tree, production can be variable.

Carpathian walnut has a rounded, spreading crown, and often reaches 40 to 60 feet in height. It is deeprooted
(nine to 12 feet) and develops strong tap-roots if restrictive layers are not present in soils. Carpathian walnut is extremely intolerant of soil flooding.

We recommand to grow this tree in a hardiness zone of 5a if protected but 5b to 6 is better for this specie.

source: Society of Ontario Nut Growers

The Persian walnut is the most popular walnut, grown in many parts of the world for nut production. It was used as a source of food on the ancient trade routes across Asia and then became established in China in the east and Europe in the west. From Europe, it spreaded west to North and South America as well as Australia as the "New World" was unfolded..

It is most commonly called "English" walnut, but it is also known by other names such as "Carpathian" walnut, and "California" walnut. The Carpathian walnut was introduced in Ontario in the mid 30's by Rev. Paul Crath. Convinced that the Persian walnut from the Carpathian Mountain region of his native Poland was hardy enough for Ontario conditions, he returned to Poland on several occasions and brought back several tons of "Carpathian" walnuts which were widely distributed over eastern North America. These trees have been successful as yard trees everywhere in zone 6 in Ontario, but only moderately successful as commercial trees. Persian introductions from Germany and Southern Russia have also met with the same success, while the Persians growth in California have proven to be less hardy and unsuited to our climate and shorter season.

The walnuts grown in Canada can stand -30 C and colder during the middle of winter, but a cold spell of -20 C in March could cause serious dieback. Late spring frosts in April or early May of -3 C could cause tip dieback and seriously reduce the crop which forms inside the tip buds. Due to the fickle nature of the tree, production can be variable.

Carpathian walnut has a rounded, spreading crown, and often reaches 40 to 60 feet in height. It is deeprooted
(nine to 12 feet) and develops strong tap-roots if restrictive layers are not present in soils. Carpathian walnut is extremely intolerant of soil flooding.

We recommand to grow this tree in a hardiness zone of 5a if protected but 5b to 6 is better for this specie.

source: Society of Ontario Nut Growers

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Geneva hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)
Geneva hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)

A highly blight resistant, possibly immune, hybrid selection. It is very productive and a relatively large plant. Nuts are large and well filled with a clean firm kernel. Ripens mid October. There are few blanks and it drops clean from the husk. It has moderate resistance to bud mite. Suited for zones 4b and over.

A highly blight resistant, possibly immune, hybrid selection. It is very productive and a relatively large plant. Nuts are large and well filled with a clean firm kernel. Ripens mid October. There are few blanks and it drops clean from the husk. It has moderate resistance to bud mite. Suited for zones 4b and over.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Grimo hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)
Grimo hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)

Faroka was the grandparent of these seedlings. Faroka is a cross of Turkish tree hazel with the European hazel. Parents are disease resistant. Large well filled nuts. Zone 4b and over.

Faroka was the grandparent of these seedlings. Faroka is a cross of Turkish tree hazel with the European hazel. Parents are disease resistant. Large well filled nuts. Zone 4b and over.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Heartnut seedlings,  Juglans ailantifolia var. cordiformis Heartnut seedlings,  Juglans ailantifolia var. cordiformis
Heartnut seedlings, Juglans ailantifolia var. cordiformis

The heartnut is native of Japan that is well suited to the southeastern part of Canada region (zone 4b to 6), a region similar to its native regions in Japan. The nut is named after the shape of the nut. It is considered a seed sport of the Japanese walnut and not a different species. The Japanese walnut is an oval nut, unlike the heart shaped form of the heartnut. It is a deciduous tree growing to 20 m tall, rarely 30 m, and 40–80 cm stem diameter, with light grey bark. The leaves are pinnate, 50–90 cm long, with 11-17 leaflets, each leaflet 7–16 cm long and 3–5 cm broad.

Though the heartnut tree will grow easely in colder regions than zone 6, it can be affected by late frosts. Since the tree is terminal bearing, the nut flowers are housed in the tip buds of the trees. These buds are the first to open in the spring and are sensitive to cold spells in April and May. Frost injured flowers will abort and so reduce the crop. We only recommend commercial orchards for zone 5.

Unlike the closely related and very similar North American Butternut, Japanese Walnut is resistant to the canker disease caused by the fungus Sirococcus clavigignenti-juglandacearum. This has led to its being planted as a replacement for Butternuts in North America. The two species hybridise readily; the resulting hybrid Juglans x bixbyi (otherwise known as J. cinera x ailantifolia or 'Buartnut') is also resistant to canker and is likewise planted as a replacement for Butternuts. Japanese Walnut is distinguished from Butternut by its larger leaves and round (not oval) nuts.

The heartnut tree is best suited for well drained fertile sand and clay loam soils with a pH of 6 to 7. They are suited for soils where black walnut and butternut grow wild. They are vigorous trees, growing 50 to 100 cm or more in a year reaching a height of 15 m and a spread of 20 to 30 m. The large lush compound leaves are largely unaffected by most insect pests. Grafted trees will begin to bear in 1-3 years, with commercial production expected in 6-8 years. The trees are long lived with annual production estimated at 1-3 tons per acre.

The heartnut is native of Japan that is well suited to the southeastern part of Canada region (zone 4b to 6), a region similar to its native regions in Japan. The nut is named after the shape of the nut. It is considered a seed sport of the Japanese walnut and not a different species. The Japanese walnut is an oval nut, unlike the heart shaped form of the heartnut. It is a deciduous tree growing to 20 m tall, rarely 30 m, and 40–80 cm stem diameter, with light grey bark. The leaves are pinnate, 50–90 cm long, with 11-17 leaflets, each leaflet 7–16 cm long and 3–5 cm broad.

Though the heartnut tree will grow easely in colder regions than zone 6, it can be affected by late frosts. Since the tree is terminal bearing, the nut flowers are housed in the tip buds of the trees. These buds are the first to open in the spring and are sensitive to cold spells in April and May. Frost injured flowers will abort and so reduce the crop. We only recommend commercial orchards for zone 5.

Unlike the closely related and very similar North American Butternut, Japanese Walnut is resistant to the canker disease caused by the fungus Sirococcus clavigignenti-juglandacearum. This has led to its being planted as a replacement for Butternuts in North America. The two species hybridise readily; the resulting hybrid Juglans x bixbyi (otherwise known as J. cinera x ailantifolia or 'Buartnut') is also resistant to canker and is likewise planted as a replacement for Butternuts. Japanese Walnut is distinguished from Butternut by its larger leaves and round (not oval) nuts.

The heartnut tree is best suited for well drained fertile sand and clay loam soils with a pH of 6 to 7. They are suited for soils where black walnut and butternut grow wild. They are vigorous trees, growing 50 to 100 cm or more in a year reaching a height of 15 m and a spread of 20 to 30 m. The large lush compound leaves are largely unaffected by most insect pests. Grafted trees will begin to bear in 1-3 years, with commercial production expected in 6-8 years. The trees are long lived with annual production estimated at 1-3 tons per acre.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Het 1 hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)
Het 1 hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)

Available

Medium size nut, Het 1 is a seedling of a Corylus heterophylla (Asian native) hybrid. It is highly blight resistant. This is a very hardy selection for colder climates like zone 3. It is moderately productive ripening nuts last week in end August-Sept.

Available

Medium size nut, Het 1 is a seedling of a Corylus heterophylla (Asian native) hybrid. It is highly blight resistant. This is a very hardy selection for colder climates like zone 3. It is moderately productive ripening nuts last week in end August-Sept.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Het 2 hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)

Available

Medium size nut with more round shaped nut than the Het 1, the Het 2 is a back crossed seedling of a Corylus heterophylla (Asian native) hybrid with americana. It is highly blight resistant. This is a very hardy selection for colder climates like zone 3a. It is moderately productive ripening nuts last week in end August-Sept. It is a good producer if planted with other Het 1 or Het 3 as well as american hazelnut.

Available

Medium size nut with more round shaped nut than the Het 1, the Het 2 is a back crossed seedling of a Corylus heterophylla (Asian native) hybrid with americana. It is highly blight resistant. This is a very hardy selection for colder climates like zone 3a. It is moderately productive ripening nuts last week in end August-Sept. It is a good producer if planted with other Het 1 or Het 3 as well as american hazelnut.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Het 3 hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)
Het 3 hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)

Available

Medium size nut, Het 3 is a seedling of a Corylus heterophylla (Asian native) hybrid. It is highly blight resistant. This is a very hardy selection for colder climates like zone 3. It is moderately productive, and ripens nuts a few days after Het 1. A good mid season pollinator.

 

Available

Medium size nut, Het 3 is a seedling of a Corylus heterophylla (Asian native) hybrid. It is highly blight resistant. This is a very hardy selection for colder climates like zone 3. It is moderately productive, and ripens nuts a few days after Het 1. A good mid season pollinator.

 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Hican,  Carya Illinoïnensis X Carya Ovata Hican,  Carya Illinoïnensis X Carya Ovata
Hican, Carya Illinoïnensis X Carya Ovata

A Hican is a cross or hybrid between Hickory and northern Pecan. The trees look and grow mostly the same as pecan trees but are more cold tolerant, like Hickory. Hicans have a distinct flavor which might be described as 80% Hickory and 20% pecan, but they look similar to a medium size pecan but with the shell a little bit thicker. The nuts are rare and highly prized. The wood, like both of its parents, is valuable and useful for smoking meats or for wood-working. Hican trees pollinate with both pecan trees and hickory trees.

Suitable for zone 4b and over. We have seen that they are very tolerant to -30°C in winter. In southern Quebec they resist to our cold winter.

Limited supply

A Hican is a cross or hybrid between Hickory and northern Pecan. The trees look and grow mostly the same as pecan trees but are more cold tolerant, like Hickory. Hicans have a distinct flavor which might be described as 80% Hickory and 20% pecan, but they look similar to a medium size pecan but with the shell a little bit thicker. The nuts are rare and highly prized. The wood, like both of its parents, is valuable and useful for smoking meats or for wood-working. Hican trees pollinate with both pecan trees and hickory trees.

Suitable for zone 4b and over. We have seen that they are very tolerant to -30°C in winter. In southern Quebec they resist to our cold winter.

Limited supply

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Hybrid Chestnut, Castanea dentata X Castanea Mollissima Hybrid Chestnut, Castanea dentata X Castanea Mollissima
Hybrid Chestnut, Castanea dentata X Castanea Mollissima

The hybrid chestnut is a cross between american and chinese. It produces larger nuts but the tree is much smaller. The Chinese chestnut and its hybrids are largely blight resistant and are being planted to fill the void. The American hybrids have the greater hardiness and timber form of the native. Not enough hardy to zone 4, suitable for zone 5.

The hybrid chestnut is a cross between american and chinese. It produces larger nuts but the tree is much smaller. The Chinese chestnut and its hybrids are largely blight resistant and are being planted to fill the void. The American hybrids have the greater hardiness and timber form of the native. Not enough hardy to zone 4, suitable for zone 5.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Hybrid walnut Dooley, Juglans regia x Juglans nigra Hybrid walnut Dooley, Juglans regia x Juglans nigra
Hybrid walnut Dooley, Juglans regia x Juglans nigra

The Dooley walnut is a hybrid between Black walnut and English walnut (carpathian walnut). Hardier than the Carpathian walnut, Juglans regia. The nuts closely resemble to the english walnut but are smaller. We think that this specie may be more profitable for those who want carpathian walnut in a colder region.

Suitable for zone 5a.

 

The Dooley walnut is a hybrid between Black walnut and English walnut (carpathian walnut). Hardier than the Carpathian walnut, Juglans regia. The nuts closely resemble to the english walnut but are smaller. We think that this specie may be more profitable for those who want carpathian walnut in a colder region.

Suitable for zone 5a.

 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Kit: Discover the walnut trees Kit: Discover the walnut trees
Kit: Discover the walnut trees

We have selected 3 species of Walnut tree for a trial. It's a good starting kit if you want nuts in your backyard!

This kit includes:

  • 1 '' Ottawa variety selected'' Black walnut, Juglans nigra suited for zone 4b, (2-3 feet)
  • 1 Buartnut, Juglans Cinerea x Juglans ailantifolia suited for zone 4b, (2-3 feet)
  • 1 Heartnut, Juglans ailantifolia var. cordiformis for zone 4b, (2-3 feet)

We have selected 3 species of Walnut tree for a trial. It's a good starting kit if you want nuts in your backyard!

This kit includes:

  • 1 '' Ottawa variety selected'' Black walnut, Juglans nigra suited for zone 4b, (2-3 feet)
  • 1 Buartnut, Juglans Cinerea x Juglans ailantifolia suited for zone 4b, (2-3 feet)
  • 1 Heartnut, Juglans ailantifolia var. cordiformis for zone 4b, (2-3 feet)
Sizes:
Korean Pine, Pinus Koraiensis Korean Pine, Pinus Koraiensis
Korean Pine, Pinus Koraiensis

Most pines produce small seeds and so are not considered suitable as food. The pines that produce seed the size of sunflower seed or larger are considered to be edible nut pines. There are about a dozen species of the nearly 200 pines worldwide that can be used for food. Native peoples of the Western United States have been using about 5 species of pine as a food source. There is a small market today where the nuts are collected from the wild and sold locally. The Colorado pinyon pine is the most cold hardy of these. In Asia, there are two pines that are important, the Korean pine, which is native from Korea in the south to Manchuria in the north, and the Siberian pine which is native north of the Korean pine to the tree line in Siberia. In Europe, there are two species, the Swiss stone pine (considered by some to be identical to the Siberian pine), and the Italian stone pine. Several nut pines species will grow in Eastern Canada. The most suitable for our climate would be the Korean pine and the Siberian or Swiss stone pines. They will grow anywhere that red and white pines are native.  It is a large tree, reaching a mature size of 40 metres to 50 metres height, and 1.5 metres  to 2 metres trunk diameter in the best conditions. The nuts are about the size of a native hazelnut.

No cultivars of pines have been selected for nut production. All of the current nuts that are sold are collected from the wild. China is a major source of imported nuts, from Korean pines mainly. These pines are slow growing and even slower to begin bearing. They can take 10 years or more to begin setting filled cones. After about 5 years the trees begin to grow more rapidly, growing 30 cm or more each year.

Suitable for zone 3a

Most pines produce small seeds and so are not considered suitable as food. The pines that produce seed the size of sunflower seed or larger are considered to be edible nut pines. There are about a dozen species of the nearly 200 pines worldwide that can be used for food. Native peoples of the Western United States have been using about 5 species of pine as a food source. There is a small market today where the nuts are collected from the wild and sold locally. The Colorado pinyon pine is the most cold hardy of these. In Asia, there are two pines that are important, the Korean pine, which is native from Korea in the south to Manchuria in the north, and the Siberian pine which is native north of the Korean pine to the tree line in Siberia. In Europe, there are two species, the Swiss stone pine (considered by some to be identical to the Siberian pine), and the Italian stone pine. Several nut pines species will grow in Eastern Canada. The most suitable for our climate would be the Korean pine and the Siberian or Swiss stone pines. They will grow anywhere that red and white pines are native.  It is a large tree, reaching a mature size of 40 metres to 50 metres height, and 1.5 metres  to 2 metres trunk diameter in the best conditions. The nuts are about the size of a native hazelnut.

No cultivars of pines have been selected for nut production. All of the current nuts that are sold are collected from the wild. China is a major source of imported nuts, from Korean pines mainly. These pines are slow growing and even slower to begin bearing. They can take 10 years or more to begin setting filled cones. After about 5 years the trees begin to grow more rapidly, growing 30 cm or more each year.

Suitable for zone 3a

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Lafeuillé #6 hybrid hazelnut seedlings

Medium to large size nuts and very productive. Best for zone 4b to 8

Medium to large size nuts and very productive. Best for zone 4b to 8

Sizes:
Manchurian walnut, Juglans mandshurica Manchurian walnut, Juglans mandshurica
Manchurian walnut, Juglans mandshurica

Out of stock

The Manchurian walnut, is a deciduous tree of the genus Juglans native to the Eastern Asiatic Region (China, Russian Far East, North Korea and South Korea). It grows to about 25 m.

The leaves are alternate, 40–90 cm long, odd-pinnate, with 7–19 leaflets, 6–17 cm long and 2–7.5 cm broad . The male flowers are in drooping catkins 9–40 cm long, the wind-pollinated female flowers (April–May) are terminal, in spikes of 4 to 10, ripening in August–October into nuts, 3-7.5 × 3–5 cm, with densely glandular pubescent green husk and very thick shell.

The tree is exceptionally hardy (down to at least -45°C), has a relatively short vegetation period compared to other walnuts, grows rapidly and is cultivated as an ornamental in colder temperate regions all over the Northern Hemisphere. (For example, it has been found to grow satisfactorily in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada zone 2b. The kernels of the nuts are edible, but small and difficult to extract. The timber is in use, but less valuable than that of English walnut or black walnut.

Out of stock

The Manchurian walnut, is a deciduous tree of the genus Juglans native to the Eastern Asiatic Region (China, Russian Far East, North Korea and South Korea). It grows to about 25 m.

The leaves are alternate, 40–90 cm long, odd-pinnate, with 7–19 leaflets, 6–17 cm long and 2–7.5 cm broad . The male flowers are in drooping catkins 9–40 cm long, the wind-pollinated female flowers (April–May) are terminal, in spikes of 4 to 10, ripening in August–October into nuts, 3-7.5 × 3–5 cm, with densely glandular pubescent green husk and very thick shell.

The tree is exceptionally hardy (down to at least -45°C), has a relatively short vegetation period compared to other walnuts, grows rapidly and is cultivated as an ornamental in colder temperate regions all over the Northern Hemisphere. (For example, it has been found to grow satisfactorily in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada zone 2b. The kernels of the nuts are edible, but small and difficult to extract. The timber is in use, but less valuable than that of English walnut or black walnut.

Mandshurian hazelnut (corylus sieboldiana) Mandshurian hazelnut (corylus sieboldiana)
Mandshurian hazelnut (corylus sieboldiana)

Corylus sieboldiana is a deciduous shrub growing to 5 m (16ft). It is hardy to zone 4. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs). Suitable for light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerate strong winds but not maritime exposure.

Corylus sieboldiana is a deciduous shrub growing to 5 m (16ft). It is hardy to zone 4. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs). Suitable for light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerate strong winds but not maritime exposure.

New-York hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)
New-York hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)

Best Geneva NY Experimantal Farm selections, medium-large nut. Suited for zones 4b and over.

Best Geneva NY Experimantal Farm selections, medium-large nut. Suited for zones 4b and over.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Northern Pecan, Carya Illinoïnensis Northern Pecan, Carya Illinoïnensis
Northern Pecan, Carya Illinoïnensis

reduced price

The Northern pecan tree may reach 70 to 100 feet in height and 40 to 80 feet in width. It has a good growing rate the first years. As a member of the Hickory family, the wood is very good for building fine furnitures or for general construction, however it is not as hard as hickory.

The northern pecan and the southern pecan are very different from each other in hardiness, nut size, and length of season required to ripen. The northern pecans are suited for the growing conditions in Ontario and maybe in extreme southern Quebec since they are from the northern tip of the growing range of the pecan. A distribution map of the native range covers much of the Mississippi Valley, with a finger of distribution extending northward along the Mississippi River into Iowa. It is in this area where the hardiest short season pecans are found.

These pecans are small, about the size of a native shagbark hickory or large hazelnut, but they have the fine flavor for which pecan is known. Selections that were the earliest to ripen, have been brought back in the 1980's from Green Island, Iowa by John Gordon, a former nut tree explorer.

Hardy to zone 4b, they resist very well to cold temperatures such -25°C and below in winter.

reduced price

The Northern pecan tree may reach 70 to 100 feet in height and 40 to 80 feet in width. It has a good growing rate the first years. As a member of the Hickory family, the wood is very good for building fine furnitures or for general construction, however it is not as hard as hickory.

The northern pecan and the southern pecan are very different from each other in hardiness, nut size, and length of season required to ripen. The northern pecans are suited for the growing conditions in Ontario and maybe in extreme southern Quebec since they are from the northern tip of the growing range of the pecan. A distribution map of the native range covers much of the Mississippi Valley, with a finger of distribution extending northward along the Mississippi River into Iowa. It is in this area where the hardiest short season pecans are found.

These pecans are small, about the size of a native shagbark hickory or large hazelnut, but they have the fine flavor for which pecan is known. Selections that were the earliest to ripen, have been brought back in the 1980's from Green Island, Iowa by John Gordon, a former nut tree explorer.

Hardy to zone 4b, they resist very well to cold temperatures such -25°C and below in winter.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Russian almond (prunus tenella) Russian almond (prunus tenella)
Russian almond (prunus tenella)

Prunus tenella is a deciduous Shrub growing to 80 cm (2ft 7in) by 1.5 m (5ft).
It is hardy to zone 2b in Canada an U.S. It is in flower in April, and the seeds ripen from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers dry or moist soil.

Fruit - raw or cooked. The fruit is quite variable in quality, the best forms are somewhat mealy with a fairly nice flavour. The fruit is about 25mm in diameter and contains one large seed. Seed - raw or cooked. Do not eat the seed if it is too bitter - see the notes above on toxicity. Oil from the seed is used as an almond flavouring, it is inferior to the bitter almond oil obtained from P. dulcis.

Caution: Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where most, if not all members of the genus produce hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is found mainly in the leaves and seed and is readily detected by its bitter taste. It is usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm but any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten. In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.

Thrives in a well-drained moisture-retentive loamy soil. Prefers some lime in the soil but is likely to become chlorotic if too much lime is present. Requires a sunny position. Dormant plants are hardy to about -25°c to -32°C. Most members of this genus are shallow-rooted and will produce suckers if the roots are damaged. This plant is a free-growing suckering shrub. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus

Prunus tenella is a deciduous Shrub growing to 80 cm (2ft 7in) by 1.5 m (5ft).
It is hardy to zone 2b in Canada an U.S. It is in flower in April, and the seeds ripen from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers dry or moist soil.

Fruit - raw or cooked. The fruit is quite variable in quality, the best forms are somewhat mealy with a fairly nice flavour. The fruit is about 25mm in diameter and contains one large seed. Seed - raw or cooked. Do not eat the seed if it is too bitter - see the notes above on toxicity. Oil from the seed is used as an almond flavouring, it is inferior to the bitter almond oil obtained from P. dulcis.

Caution: Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where most, if not all members of the genus produce hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is found mainly in the leaves and seed and is readily detected by its bitter taste. It is usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm but any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten. In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.

Thrives in a well-drained moisture-retentive loamy soil. Prefers some lime in the soil but is likely to become chlorotic if too much lime is present. Requires a sunny position. Dormant plants are hardy to about -25°c to -32°C. Most members of this genus are shallow-rooted and will produce suckers if the roots are damaged. This plant is a free-growing suckering shrub. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Seedlings of Buartnut Mitchell, Juglans cinerea X Juglans ailantifolia Seedlings of Buartnut Mitchell, Juglans cinerea X Juglans ailantifolia
Seedlings of Buartnut Mitchell, Juglans cinerea X Juglans ailantifolia

Out of stock

A cross of Butternut and Heartnut, this handsome, medium-size shade tree produces abundant crops of tasty nuts. Buartnuts combine the hardiness and delicious flavor of Butternut with the high yields and easy to crack shell of the Heartnut. The Mitchell Buartnut is a medium size nut, heartnut shaped shell, fairly good cracking, productive and an early pollinator.

Bearing Age:7-8 years after planting a small seedling.

Size at Maturity: 25 - 30 ft. in height and can spread to 25 ft.

Out of stock

A cross of Butternut and Heartnut, this handsome, medium-size shade tree produces abundant crops of tasty nuts. Buartnuts combine the hardiness and delicious flavor of Butternut with the high yields and easy to crack shell of the Heartnut. The Mitchell Buartnut is a medium size nut, heartnut shaped shell, fairly good cracking, productive and an early pollinator.

Bearing Age:7-8 years after planting a small seedling.

Size at Maturity: 25 - 30 ft. in height and can spread to 25 ft.

seedlings of Hybrid hazelnut Monteregie
seedlings of Hybrid hazelnut Monteregie

This is a seedling of southern Quebec trees source very productive.  It has moderate blight resistance. It is productive and forms a large tree. The nut is medium to larrge in size, well filled and clean. The nuts drop clean from the husks about the last week of September. It has good resistance to bud mite.

This is a seedling of southern Quebec trees source very productive.  It has moderate blight resistance. It is productive and forms a large tree. The nut is medium to larrge in size, well filled and clean. The nuts drop clean from the husks about the last week of September. It has good resistance to bud mite.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
seedlings of Northern hazelnut, C. avellana X C. americana X C. heterophylla seedlings of Northern hazelnut, C. avellana X C. americana X C. heterophylla
seedlings of Northern hazelnut, C. avellana X C. americana X C. heterophylla

Native and Asian hybrids crossed with European hazels, zone 3b and over, small to medium size nut.

Very hardy and a very good pollinator for other varieties. We recommend this product.

Native and Asian hybrids crossed with European hazels, zone 3b and over, small to medium size nut.

Very hardy and a very good pollinator for other varieties. We recommend this product.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Select Black Walnut, Juglans nigra Select Black Walnut, Juglans nigra
Select Black Walnut, Juglans nigra

Seedlings from large nuts

The black walnut is one of the most successful edible nut trees in southern canada. It is well adapted to our winter cold, and unlike Persian walnuts, avoids late spring frosts by delaying leafing in the spring. As a result it is suited to most of Southern Quebec and Ontario. A strain of black walnut has even adapted itself to the rigors of the dry fertile prairies (zone 3) of Manitoba. More limiting than climate is the soil type and drainage conditions. Black walnut succeeds well beyond its native range, wherever pH readings are between 6 and 7. Eroded limestone soils ranging from sand to clay are ideal. Deep well-drained soils are important to proper development and growth. The black walnut is a large deciduous tree reaching heights of 30–40 m (98–131 ft). Under forest competition, it develops a tall, clear trunk; the open-grown form has a short trunk and broad crown.

Even though the black walnut is well established in Ontario and we see more plantation in southern Quebec, the crop of delicious nuts it produces has not been utilized except by a few persistent foragers. The early pioneers highly valued the rich tasting nuts and put away many sacks of them each year. Each farmstead had its orchard of fruit and nut trees to provide it with its source of winter food. Most of them all disappeared when easier cracking Persian walnuts became common in the grocery stores. With modern tree shakers, harvesters, nut hullers, crackers and sorting machines being available, it is possible to profit from the nut crop again. The industry is alive and well in Stockton, Missouri where millions of pounds of black walnuts are processed each year. The total kernel crop is marketed domestically. Almost none is left over for export.

See the nutritional facts in the PDF above

Suitable for zone 4a.

Seedlings from large nuts

The black walnut is one of the most successful edible nut trees in southern canada. It is well adapted to our winter cold, and unlike Persian walnuts, avoids late spring frosts by delaying leafing in the spring. As a result it is suited to most of Southern Quebec and Ontario. A strain of black walnut has even adapted itself to the rigors of the dry fertile prairies (zone 3) of Manitoba. More limiting than climate is the soil type and drainage conditions. Black walnut succeeds well beyond its native range, wherever pH readings are between 6 and 7. Eroded limestone soils ranging from sand to clay are ideal. Deep well-drained soils are important to proper development and growth. The black walnut is a large deciduous tree reaching heights of 30–40 m (98–131 ft). Under forest competition, it develops a tall, clear trunk; the open-grown form has a short trunk and broad crown.

Even though the black walnut is well established in Ontario and we see more plantation in southern Quebec, the crop of delicious nuts it produces has not been utilized except by a few persistent foragers. The early pioneers highly valued the rich tasting nuts and put away many sacks of them each year. Each farmstead had its orchard of fruit and nut trees to provide it with its source of winter food. Most of them all disappeared when easier cracking Persian walnuts became common in the grocery stores. With modern tree shakers, harvesters, nut hullers, crackers and sorting machines being available, it is possible to profit from the nut crop again. The industry is alive and well in Stockton, Missouri where millions of pounds of black walnuts are processed each year. The total kernel crop is marketed domestically. Almost none is left over for export.

See the nutritional facts in the PDF above

Suitable for zone 4a.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Select Shagbark Hickory, (carya ovata) Select Shagbark Hickory, (carya ovata)
Select Shagbark Hickory, (carya ovata)

Larger nuts than the common shargbark hickory. Ideal for nut production. Hardy to zone 4b.

Larger nuts than the common shargbark hickory. Ideal for nut production. Hardy to zone 4b.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Shagbark Hickory, Carya ovata Shagbark Hickory, Carya ovata
Shagbark Hickory, Carya ovata

A remakable specie indigenous to North America, shagbark hickory trees are widespread in the Eastern U.S. and in southern ontario and very sporadic in southern Quebec in zones 4 to 8. Shagbark hickory trees are related to the pecan, another nut tree indigenous to North America. Although they can reach a height of 130 feet or 30 m in some portions of their range, shagbark hickory trees often reach only about half that size. They grow in full to partial sun. The Shagbark Hickory tree has an ashy gray bark similar to birch trees except its bark separates into long strips, which give the trunk it's shaggy look.

The Shagbark Hickories branches can spread to 25 feet, the lower branches somewhat droop while the upper branches are upright. The branches in the middle are just about horizontal. The wood of this tree is strong and tough. The Shagbark has both male and female flowers.

The nuts are edible with an excellent flavor, and are a popular food among people and squirrels alike. They are unsuitable for commercial or orchard production due to the long time it takes for a tree to produce sizable crops and unpredictable output from year to year. Shagbark hickories can grow to enormous sizes but are unreliable bearers. The nuts can be used as a substitute for the pecan in colder climates and have nearly the same culinary function.

C. ovata begins producing seeds at about 10 years of age, but large quantities are not produced until 40 years and will continue for at least 100. Nut production is erratic, with good crops every 3 to 5 years, in between which few or none appear and the entire crop may be lost to animal predation.

Hickory has traditionally been very popular as a fuelwood and as a charcoal-producing wood. The general low percentage of hickory in the overstory of many privately owned woodlots is due in part to selective cutting of the hickory for fuelwood. Hickory fuelwood has a high heat value, burns evenly, and produces long-lasting steady heat; the charcoal gives food a hickory-smoked flavor.

The wood of the true hickories is known for its strength, and no commercial species of wood is equal to it in combined strength, toughness, hardness, and stiffness.

The tree is hardy to canadian zone 3b.

Ask us for a quote when large quantity is desired.

A remakable specie indigenous to North America, shagbark hickory trees are widespread in the Eastern U.S. and in southern ontario and very sporadic in southern Quebec in zones 4 to 8. Shagbark hickory trees are related to the pecan, another nut tree indigenous to North America. Although they can reach a height of 130 feet or 30 m in some portions of their range, shagbark hickory trees often reach only about half that size. They grow in full to partial sun. The Shagbark Hickory tree has an ashy gray bark similar to birch trees except its bark separates into long strips, which give the trunk it's shaggy look.

The Shagbark Hickories branches can spread to 25 feet, the lower branches somewhat droop while the upper branches are upright. The branches in the middle are just about horizontal. The wood of this tree is strong and tough. The Shagbark has both male and female flowers.

The nuts are edible with an excellent flavor, and are a popular food among people and squirrels alike. They are unsuitable for commercial or orchard production due to the long time it takes for a tree to produce sizable crops and unpredictable output from year to year. Shagbark hickories can grow to enormous sizes but are unreliable bearers. The nuts can be used as a substitute for the pecan in colder climates and have nearly the same culinary function.

C. ovata begins producing seeds at about 10 years of age, but large quantities are not produced until 40 years and will continue for at least 100. Nut production is erratic, with good crops every 3 to 5 years, in between which few or none appear and the entire crop may be lost to animal predation.

Hickory has traditionally been very popular as a fuelwood and as a charcoal-producing wood. The general low percentage of hickory in the overstory of many privately owned woodlots is due in part to selective cutting of the hickory for fuelwood. Hickory fuelwood has a high heat value, burns evenly, and produces long-lasting steady heat; the charcoal gives food a hickory-smoked flavor.

The wood of the true hickories is known for its strength, and no commercial species of wood is equal to it in combined strength, toughness, hardness, and stiffness.

The tree is hardy to canadian zone 3b.

Ask us for a quote when large quantity is desired.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Shellbark Hickory, Carya laciniosa        Shellbark Hickory, Carya laciniosa
Shellbark Hickory, Carya laciniosa

The shellbark hickory or big shagbark hickory is sometimes called Kingnut Hickory, as it is sometimes called as another hickory specie that is native to the mildest regions of Ontario and widespread in eastern USA. Attesting to some of its characteristics. It is a slow-growing, long-lived tree, hard to transplant because of its long taproot. reaching an height of 60 to 80 feet and spreading to 40 to 60 feet.

Shellbark hickory grows best on deep, fertile, moist soils, most typical of the order Alfisols. It does not thrive in heavy clay soils, but grows well on heavy loams or silt loams. Shellbark hickory requires moister situations than do pignut, mockernut, or shagbark hickories (Carya glabra, C. alba, or C. ovata), although it is sometimes found on dry, sandy soils. Specific nutrient requirements are not known, but generally the hickories grow best on neutral or slightly alkaline soils.

The nuts, largest of all hickory nuts, are sweet and edible but have a thick shell. The wood is hard, heavy, strong, and very flexible, making it a favored wood for tool handles. It has a nut that ranges from shagbark size to a large egg size. Its kernel can match the Persian walnut in size. The shell is generally thicker than a shagbark, requiring a good nutcracker or vise to break through it to get at the nut meat inside. Shellbark hickory nuts have internal shell ridges like the shagbark that make kernel removal difficult. In other respects, the shellbark is similar to the shagbark. Generally, the shellbark hickory needs the long hot summers found further south to ripen the nuts.

Minimum for canadien zone 4b.

The shellbark hickory or big shagbark hickory is sometimes called Kingnut Hickory, as it is sometimes called as another hickory specie that is native to the mildest regions of Ontario and widespread in eastern USA. Attesting to some of its characteristics. It is a slow-growing, long-lived tree, hard to transplant because of its long taproot. reaching an height of 60 to 80 feet and spreading to 40 to 60 feet.

Shellbark hickory grows best on deep, fertile, moist soils, most typical of the order Alfisols. It does not thrive in heavy clay soils, but grows well on heavy loams or silt loams. Shellbark hickory requires moister situations than do pignut, mockernut, or shagbark hickories (Carya glabra, C. alba, or C. ovata), although it is sometimes found on dry, sandy soils. Specific nutrient requirements are not known, but generally the hickories grow best on neutral or slightly alkaline soils.

The nuts, largest of all hickory nuts, are sweet and edible but have a thick shell. The wood is hard, heavy, strong, and very flexible, making it a favored wood for tool handles. It has a nut that ranges from shagbark size to a large egg size. Its kernel can match the Persian walnut in size. The shell is generally thicker than a shagbark, requiring a good nutcracker or vise to break through it to get at the nut meat inside. Shellbark hickory nuts have internal shell ridges like the shagbark that make kernel removal difficult. In other respects, the shellbark is similar to the shagbark. Generally, the shellbark hickory needs the long hot summers found further south to ripen the nuts.

Minimum for canadien zone 4b.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Siberian Pine, Pinus Siberica Siberian Pine, Pinus Siberica
Siberian Pine, Pinus Siberica

Pinus sibirica is a member of the white pine group, Pinus subgenus strobus, and like all members of that group, the leaves 'needles' are in fascicles (bundles) of five, with a deciduous sheath. They are 5–10 cm long. Siberian pine cones are 5–9 cm long. The 9–12 mm long seeds have only a vestigial wing. Siberian pine, Pinus sibirica, is a popular ornamental tree in parks and large gardens where the climate is cold, such as central Canada, giving steady though not fast growth on a wide range of sites. It is very tolerant of severe winter cold, hardy down to at least –60 °C, and also of wind exposure. The mature size is up to 30–40 m height, and 1.5 m trunk diameter. Its maximum lifetime is 800–850 years. The seeds are also harvested and sold as pine nuts but are smaller than the korean pine which is the most valuable pine nut specie.

Pinus sibirica is a member of the white pine group, Pinus subgenus strobus, and like all members of that group, the leaves 'needles' are in fascicles (bundles) of five, with a deciduous sheath. They are 5–10 cm long. Siberian pine cones are 5–9 cm long. The 9–12 mm long seeds have only a vestigial wing. Siberian pine, Pinus sibirica, is a popular ornamental tree in parks and large gardens where the climate is cold, such as central Canada, giving steady though not fast growth on a wide range of sites. It is very tolerant of severe winter cold, hardy down to at least –60 °C, and also of wind exposure. The mature size is up to 30–40 m height, and 1.5 m trunk diameter. Its maximum lifetime is 800–850 years. The seeds are also harvested and sold as pine nuts but are smaller than the korean pine which is the most valuable pine nut specie.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Slate hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)
Slate hazelnut tree seedling (corylus SPP.)

A highly blight resistant, possibly immune, hybrid selection. This is a very productive medium sized plant, producing few suckers. The nuts are large, well filled with a clean firm kernel. This selection ripens a few days ahead of Geneva. There are few blanks and it drops cleanly from the husk. It has moderate resistance to bud mite. Suited for zone 4b and over.

A highly blight resistant, possibly immune, hybrid selection. This is a very productive medium sized plant, producing few suckers. The nuts are large, well filled with a clean firm kernel. This selection ripens a few days ahead of Geneva. There are few blanks and it drops cleanly from the husk. It has moderate resistance to bud mite. Suited for zone 4b and over.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Turkish Hazel, Corylus colurna Turkish Hazel, Corylus colurna
Turkish Hazel, Corylus colurna

Corylus colurna (Turkish hazel or Turkish filbert) is a deciduous tree native to southeast Europe and southwest Asia, from the Balkans through northern Turkey to northern Iran. It is the largest specieof hazel, reaching 25 m (82 ft) tall, with a stout trunk up to 1.5 m (4 ft ) in diameter; the crown is slender and conical in young trees, becoming broader with age. The bark is pale grey-buff, with a thick, corky texture. The leaves are deciduous, rounded, 6–15 cm long and 5–13 cm across, softly hairy on both surfaces, and with a coarsely double-serrate to shallowly lobed margin. The main limbs are quite small in diameter in relationship to the straight trunk, and arise at almost a 90-degree angle. Making the tree quite durable to urban conditions and helps maintain a symmetrical crown which landscape architects love so much. Corylus colurna has a medium growth rate.

 

Corylus colurna is occasionally drought tolerant and alkaline soil tolerant. However, it prefers moist, well-drained soil, as well as full sun. Once established Corylus colurna is tolerant of heat, cold, and drought. There are no serious pests or problems with Corylus colurna. Corylus colurna is not easily transplantable, and will need extra watering in summer after transplanting. It will take about two years after transplant for the tree to become establish and survive on its own.

 

Ornamental tree form, easy care trees, small nut. Suited for zones 4b and over.

Corylus colurna (Turkish hazel or Turkish filbert) is a deciduous tree native to southeast Europe and southwest Asia, from the Balkans through northern Turkey to northern Iran. It is the largest specieof hazel, reaching 25 m (82 ft) tall, with a stout trunk up to 1.5 m (4 ft ) in diameter; the crown is slender and conical in young trees, becoming broader with age. The bark is pale grey-buff, with a thick, corky texture. The leaves are deciduous, rounded, 6–15 cm long and 5–13 cm across, softly hairy on both surfaces, and with a coarsely double-serrate to shallowly lobed margin. The main limbs are quite small in diameter in relationship to the straight trunk, and arise at almost a 90-degree angle. Making the tree quite durable to urban conditions and helps maintain a symmetrical crown which landscape architects love so much. Corylus colurna has a medium growth rate.

 

Corylus colurna is occasionally drought tolerant and alkaline soil tolerant. However, it prefers moist, well-drained soil, as well as full sun. Once established Corylus colurna is tolerant of heat, cold, and drought. There are no serious pests or problems with Corylus colurna. Corylus colurna is not easily transplantable, and will need extra watering in summer after transplanting. It will take about two years after transplant for the tree to become establish and survive on its own.

 

Ornamental tree form, easy care trees, small nut. Suited for zones 4b and over.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
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