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Home / OUR TREES / Berries, minor fruits and fruit trees
Berries, minor fruits and fruit trees

Berries, minor fruits and fruit trees

In this section, we offer berries, minor fruits and fruit trees. Some of them are rare to find elsewhere. Come back often to see our list of products; each year we offer new varieties.

'russian Orange' sea buckthorn (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides) 'russian Orange' sea buckthorn (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides)
'russian Orange' sea buckthorn (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides)

NEW

Large upright shrub with small yellow flowers and attractive grey-green foliage. Orange yellow berries in summer, one of the earliest varieties to ripen. Berries are very tasty and healthy, great for juice. Used in medicinal oils. Used in medicinal oils. High in Vitamin C, A and E. Needs a male pollinator.

NEW

Large upright shrub with small yellow flowers and attractive grey-green foliage. Orange yellow berries in summer, one of the earliest varieties to ripen. Berries are very tasty and healthy, great for juice. Used in medicinal oils. Used in medicinal oils. High in Vitamin C, A and E. Needs a male pollinator.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
(Female) Kiwi Anna (A.Arguta) (Female) Kiwi Anna (A.Arguta)
(Female) Kiwi Anna (A.Arguta)

Hardy kiwi has emerald-green flesh and a sweet taste similar to fuzzy kiwi, but they’re smaller and you eat them like a grape, tender skin and all. Kiwis require a male and female plant for pollination. ‘Anna’, our hardy female kiwi, is a vigorous vine that produces more than 100 lbs of fruit 3 to 4 years after planting. This item is an extra female for those who already have a male. Hardy to zone 4.

Hardy kiwi has emerald-green flesh and a sweet taste similar to fuzzy kiwi, but they’re smaller and you eat them like a grape, tender skin and all. Kiwis require a male and female plant for pollination. ‘Anna’, our hardy female kiwi, is a vigorous vine that produces more than 100 lbs of fruit 3 to 4 years after planting. This item is an extra female for those who already have a male. Hardy to zone 4.

Sizes:
(Female) Kiwi Issai (A. Arguta)
(Female) Kiwi Issai (A. Arguta)

'Issai' (Self-fertile female, Does not need a male pollinator)
This unique variety can grow in places too cold for typical kiwis, surviving temperatures as low as - 31°C or  -25F. A vigorous and fast growing vine that needs no pollinator (male) to produce. Attractive landscape specimen with green foliage that grows well on an arbor, trellis, or fence. Deciduous.

Requires strong support to hold up the plants and the abundant fruit.  Often begins bearing the year after planting. Flowers in spring and ripens in September.
Full or mostly sun. Zones 3-8. Water regularly during the first year to establish an extensive root system. General purpose fertilizer. Grows 20 – 25 feet in length. Prune in winter to control size.

'Issai' (Self-fertile female, Does not need a male pollinator)
This unique variety can grow in places too cold for typical kiwis, surviving temperatures as low as - 31°C or  -25F. A vigorous and fast growing vine that needs no pollinator (male) to produce. Attractive landscape specimen with green foliage that grows well on an arbor, trellis, or fence. Deciduous.

Requires strong support to hold up the plants and the abundant fruit.  Often begins bearing the year after planting. Flowers in spring and ripens in September.
Full or mostly sun. Zones 3-8. Water regularly during the first year to establish an extensive root system. General purpose fertilizer. Grows 20 – 25 feet in length. Prune in winter to control size.

Sizes:
Alpricot  Morden 604 Alpricot  Morden 604
Alpricot Morden 604

Hardiness Zone:  3b

Other Names:  Morden 604 Apricot

A hardy apricot featuring showy pink flowers in early spring followed by tasty golden fruit in mid-summer, good for preserves; quite ornamental, ideal for the home orchard; needs full sun and a pollinator, flowers can be damaged by late spring frosts

Edible Qualities

Westcot Apricot is a medium-sized tree that is typically grown for its edible qualities. It produces yellow round fruit (technically 'drupes') with gold overtones and gold flesh which are usually ready for picking in late summer. Note that the fruits have hard inedible pits inside which must be removed before eating or processing. The fruits have a sweet taste and a firm texture.

The fruit are most often used in the following ways:

Fresh Eating
Cooking
Preserves

Features & Attributes

Westcot Apricot is blanketed in stunning clusters of fragrant shell pink flowers along the branches in early spring, which emerge from distinctive pink flower buds before the leaves. It has green foliage throughout the season. The pointy leaves turn yellow in fall. The fruits are showy yellow drupes with gold overtones, which are carried in abundance in late summer. The fruit can be messy if allowed to drop on the lawn or walkways, and may require occasional clean-up.

This is a deciduous tree with a more or less rounded form. Its average texture blends into the landscape, but can be balanced by one or two finer or coarser trees or shrubs for an effective composition. This plant will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter once the threat of extreme cold has passed. Gardeners should be aware of the following characteristic(s) that may warrant special consideration;

Messy
Disease

Aside from its primary use as an edible, Westcot Apricot is sutiable for the following landscape applications;

Shade
Orchard/Edible Landscaping

Planting & Growing

Westcot Apricot will grow to be about 30 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 25 feet. It has a low canopy with a typical clearance of 4 feet from the ground, and should not be planted underneath power lines. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for 50 years or more. This variety requires a different selection of the same species growing nearby in order to set fruit.

This tree is typically grown in a designated area of the yard because of its mature size and spread. It should only be grown in full sunlight. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments, and will benefit from being planted in a relatively sheltered location. This is a selected variety of a species not originally from North America.

Hardiness Zone:  3b

Other Names:  Morden 604 Apricot

A hardy apricot featuring showy pink flowers in early spring followed by tasty golden fruit in mid-summer, good for preserves; quite ornamental, ideal for the home orchard; needs full sun and a pollinator, flowers can be damaged by late spring frosts

Edible Qualities

Westcot Apricot is a medium-sized tree that is typically grown for its edible qualities. It produces yellow round fruit (technically 'drupes') with gold overtones and gold flesh which are usually ready for picking in late summer. Note that the fruits have hard inedible pits inside which must be removed before eating or processing. The fruits have a sweet taste and a firm texture.

The fruit are most often used in the following ways:

Fresh Eating
Cooking
Preserves

Features & Attributes

Westcot Apricot is blanketed in stunning clusters of fragrant shell pink flowers along the branches in early spring, which emerge from distinctive pink flower buds before the leaves. It has green foliage throughout the season. The pointy leaves turn yellow in fall. The fruits are showy yellow drupes with gold overtones, which are carried in abundance in late summer. The fruit can be messy if allowed to drop on the lawn or walkways, and may require occasional clean-up.

This is a deciduous tree with a more or less rounded form. Its average texture blends into the landscape, but can be balanced by one or two finer or coarser trees or shrubs for an effective composition. This plant will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter once the threat of extreme cold has passed. Gardeners should be aware of the following characteristic(s) that may warrant special consideration;

Messy
Disease

Aside from its primary use as an edible, Westcot Apricot is sutiable for the following landscape applications;

Shade
Orchard/Edible Landscaping

Planting & Growing

Westcot Apricot will grow to be about 30 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 25 feet. It has a low canopy with a typical clearance of 4 feet from the ground, and should not be planted underneath power lines. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for 50 years or more. This variety requires a different selection of the same species growing nearby in order to set fruit.

This tree is typically grown in a designated area of the yard because of its mature size and spread. It should only be grown in full sunlight. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments, and will benefit from being planted in a relatively sheltered location. This is a selected variety of a species not originally from North America.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Alpricot Point-du-jour
Alpricot Point-du-jour
Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Amelanchier 'Honey Wood'
Amelanchier 'Honey Wood'

Large fruit producing shrub with glossy green foliage that changes to a vivid orange-red Fall Colour. Useful shrub in the border. Large purplish-blue berries in late summer used for pies, jams or eating fresh.
Flower Attributes: Fragrant Showy Flowers
Landscape Uses: Border, Erosion Control,Mass Planting
Garden Styles: Cottage, Modern
Light Needs: Full Sun
Plant Types: Small Fruits
Height: 5-10'
Spread: 5-10'
Flower Colors: White
Flower Seasons: Spring
Special Features: Attracts Butterflies, Edible,

Cold Hardiness: Zone 3

To enhance productivity, pruning in the spring is recommended, allowing the bush to maintain balance between the new stems and less productive old stems, and to keep it from growing too high. Remove broken and dead branches, as well as the largest ones (diameter of about 4-5 cm) at the base. Regular pruning increases the plant’s life cycle and productivity. Pruning should start in the first year of planting, in early spring.

Large fruit producing shrub with glossy green foliage that changes to a vivid orange-red Fall Colour. Useful shrub in the border. Large purplish-blue berries in late summer used for pies, jams or eating fresh.
Flower Attributes: Fragrant Showy Flowers
Landscape Uses: Border, Erosion Control,Mass Planting
Garden Styles: Cottage, Modern
Light Needs: Full Sun
Plant Types: Small Fruits
Height: 5-10'
Spread: 5-10'
Flower Colors: White
Flower Seasons: Spring
Special Features: Attracts Butterflies, Edible,

Cold Hardiness: Zone 3

To enhance productivity, pruning in the spring is recommended, allowing the bush to maintain balance between the new stems and less productive old stems, and to keep it from growing too high. Remove broken and dead branches, as well as the largest ones (diameter of about 4-5 cm) at the base. Regular pruning increases the plant’s life cycle and productivity. Pruning should start in the first year of planting, in early spring.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Amelanchier 'Isaac'
Amelanchier 'Isaac'

Hardy to zone 3a
This is a small, very abundant fruit shrub (1 meter to 1,5 meters or 3 to 6 feet) that produces large, sweet berries. The Isaac is highly decorative and its fruits are not clustered. The fruit of this cultivar must be picked immediately upon ripening before falling to the ground.

To enhance productivity, pruning in the spring is recommended, allowing the bush to maintain balance between the new stems and less productive old stems, and to keep it from growing too high. Remove broken and dead branches, as well as the largest ones (diameter of about 4-5 cm) at the base. Regular pruning increases the plant’s life cycle and productivity. Pruning should start in the first year of planting, in early spring.

Hardy to zone 3a
This is a small, very abundant fruit shrub (1 meter to 1,5 meters or 3 to 6 feet) that produces large, sweet berries. The Isaac is highly decorative and its fruits are not clustered. The fruit of this cultivar must be picked immediately upon ripening before falling to the ground.

To enhance productivity, pruning in the spring is recommended, allowing the bush to maintain balance between the new stems and less productive old stems, and to keep it from growing too high. Remove broken and dead branches, as well as the largest ones (diameter of about 4-5 cm) at the base. Regular pruning increases the plant’s life cycle and productivity. Pruning should start in the first year of planting, in early spring.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Amelanchier 'Martin'
Amelanchier 'Martin'

Largest fruit available. An improved selection of Thiessen with larger blue berries, uniform ripening and compact form. A heavy producer. Harvest in early summer.
Zone: 2
Location: Sun, part shade
Height: 3 m 10'
Width: 2 m 6'
 

Largest fruit available. An improved selection of Thiessen with larger blue berries, uniform ripening and compact form. A heavy producer. Harvest in early summer.
Zone: 2
Location: Sun, part shade
Height: 3 m 10'
Width: 2 m 6'
 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Amelanchier 'Northline'
Amelanchier 'Northline'

A favourite with many growers for its wonderful flavour and large, blue berries. Harvest in early summer.
Zone: 2
Location: Sun
Height: 2 m 6'
Width: 2 m 6'
Flowering time: depend on the hardiness zone.

To enhance productivity, pruning in the spring is recommended, allowing the bush to maintain balance between the new stems and less productive old stems, and to keep it from growing too high. Remove broken and dead branches, as well as the largest ones (diameter of about 4-5 cm) at the base. Regular pruning increases the plant’s life cycle and productivity. Pruning should start in the first year of planting, in early spring.

A favourite with many growers for its wonderful flavour and large, blue berries. Harvest in early summer.
Zone: 2
Location: Sun
Height: 2 m 6'
Width: 2 m 6'
Flowering time: depend on the hardiness zone.

To enhance productivity, pruning in the spring is recommended, allowing the bush to maintain balance between the new stems and less productive old stems, and to keep it from growing too high. Remove broken and dead branches, as well as the largest ones (diameter of about 4-5 cm) at the base. Regular pruning increases the plant’s life cycle and productivity. Pruning should start in the first year of planting, in early spring.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Amelanchier 'Thiessen'
Amelanchier 'Thiessen'

Early flowering variety which is a favourite for eating fresh. The large, blue berries has a mild, pleasant flavour. Harvest in early summer.
Zone: 2
Location: Sun
Height: 3 m 10'
Width: 2 m 6'

To enhance productivity, pruning in the spring is recommended, allowing the bush to maintain balance between the new stems and less productive old stems, and to keep it from growing too high. Remove broken and dead branches, as well as the largest ones (diameter of about 4-5 cm) at the base. Regular pruning increases the plant’s life cycle and productivity. Pruning should start in the first year of planting, in early spring.

Early flowering variety which is a favourite for eating fresh. The large, blue berries has a mild, pleasant flavour. Harvest in early summer.
Zone: 2
Location: Sun
Height: 3 m 10'
Width: 2 m 6'

To enhance productivity, pruning in the spring is recommended, allowing the bush to maintain balance between the new stems and less productive old stems, and to keep it from growing too high. Remove broken and dead branches, as well as the largest ones (diameter of about 4-5 cm) at the base. Regular pruning increases the plant’s life cycle and productivity. Pruning should start in the first year of planting, in early spring.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
amelanchier 'Trappiste'
amelanchier 'Trappiste'

The Trappiste saskatoon is one of the smallest but most productive varieties, with purplish-blue berries. The plant blooms in May, and the shrub reaches about 2.5 metres in height or 9 feet. The berries can be eaten fresh or used in recipes.
To enhance productivity, pruning in the spring is recommended, allowing the bush to maintain balance between the new stems and less productive old stems, and to keep it from growing too high. Remove broken and dead branches, as well as the largest ones (diameter of about 4-5 cm) at the base. Regular pruning increases the plant’s life cycle and productivity. Pruning should start in the first year of planting, in early spring.
 

The Trappiste saskatoon is one of the smallest but most productive varieties, with purplish-blue berries. The plant blooms in May, and the shrub reaches about 2.5 metres in height or 9 feet. The berries can be eaten fresh or used in recipes.
To enhance productivity, pruning in the spring is recommended, allowing the bush to maintain balance between the new stems and less productive old stems, and to keep it from growing too high. Remove broken and dead branches, as well as the largest ones (diameter of about 4-5 cm) at the base. Regular pruning increases the plant’s life cycle and productivity. Pruning should start in the first year of planting, in early spring.
 

Sizes:
American plum, (prunus americana) American plum, (prunus americana)
American plum, (prunus americana)

Prunus americana, commonly called the American plum, wild plum, or Marshall's large yellow sweet plum, is a species of Prunus native to North America from Saskatchewan and Idaho south to New Mexico and east to Québec, Maine and Florida.

Prunus americana has often been planted outside its native range and sometimes escapes cultivation. It is commonly confused with the Canada plum (Prunus nigra), although the fruit is smaller and rounder and bright red as opposed to yellow. Many cultivated varieties have been derived from this species. It forms an excellent stock upon which to graft the domestic plum.

The American plum grows as a large shrub or small tree, reaching up to 15 feet (4.6 m). It is adapted to coarse- and medium-textured soils, but not to fine soils. The shrub is winter-hardy, but has little tolerance for shade, drought, or fire. Its growth is most active in spring and summer, and it blooms in midspring. It propagates by seed, but the rate of spread by seed is slow.

The roots are shallow, widely spread, and send up suckers.The numerous stems per plant become scaly with age. The tree has a broad crown. The branches are thorny. The leaves are alternately arranged, with an oval shape. The leaf length is usually 2–4 in (5.1–10.2 cm) long. The upper surface of the leaf is dark green and under side is smooth and pale. The small white flowers with five petals occur singly or in clusters in the leaf axils. The globular fruits are about 1 in (2.5 cm) in diameter.

The American plum is used for both ornamental and culinary purposes. The white flowers are decorative in spring and its short, single leader makes it a popular residential landscape tree. Sargent says of it: "As an ornamental plant P. americana has real value; the long wand-like branches form a wide, graceful head which is handsome in winter and in spring is covered with masses of pure white flowers followed by ample bright foliage and abundant showy fruit."More than 200 forms of American plum have been grown for cultivation. The sour and sweet fruit is eaten fresh and is processed as preserves, jellies, jam and wine.

Farms use medium to tall shrubs or trees for windbreaks, and highway or riverside plantings. Its high density of growth effectively reduces the wind velocity near the ground. Development of suckers from the root system makes American plum effective in stabilizing stream banks and gullies. It will tolerate several days of flooding. Some commercial properties plant the trees along the entrance road.

Prunus americana, commonly called the American plum, wild plum, or Marshall's large yellow sweet plum, is a species of Prunus native to North America from Saskatchewan and Idaho south to New Mexico and east to Québec, Maine and Florida.

Prunus americana has often been planted outside its native range and sometimes escapes cultivation. It is commonly confused with the Canada plum (Prunus nigra), although the fruit is smaller and rounder and bright red as opposed to yellow. Many cultivated varieties have been derived from this species. It forms an excellent stock upon which to graft the domestic plum.

The American plum grows as a large shrub or small tree, reaching up to 15 feet (4.6 m). It is adapted to coarse- and medium-textured soils, but not to fine soils. The shrub is winter-hardy, but has little tolerance for shade, drought, or fire. Its growth is most active in spring and summer, and it blooms in midspring. It propagates by seed, but the rate of spread by seed is slow.

The roots are shallow, widely spread, and send up suckers.The numerous stems per plant become scaly with age. The tree has a broad crown. The branches are thorny. The leaves are alternately arranged, with an oval shape. The leaf length is usually 2–4 in (5.1–10.2 cm) long. The upper surface of the leaf is dark green and under side is smooth and pale. The small white flowers with five petals occur singly or in clusters in the leaf axils. The globular fruits are about 1 in (2.5 cm) in diameter.

The American plum is used for both ornamental and culinary purposes. The white flowers are decorative in spring and its short, single leader makes it a popular residential landscape tree. Sargent says of it: "As an ornamental plant P. americana has real value; the long wand-like branches form a wide, graceful head which is handsome in winter and in spring is covered with masses of pure white flowers followed by ample bright foliage and abundant showy fruit."More than 200 forms of American plum have been grown for cultivation. The sour and sweet fruit is eaten fresh and is processed as preserves, jellies, jam and wine.

Farms use medium to tall shrubs or trees for windbreaks, and highway or riverside plantings. Its high density of growth effectively reduces the wind velocity near the ground. Development of suckers from the root system makes American plum effective in stabilizing stream banks and gullies. It will tolerate several days of flooding. Some commercial properties plant the trees along the entrance road.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
apple tree 'Alexander'
apple tree 'Alexander'

The Alexander apple variety (Malus  Alexander) is an heirloom variety originating from Ukraine in the 1700's.

The fruit

The Alexander apple is giant. You can make a whole pie using only one apple! It is not a very good keeper, but it will be okay if stored up to two months. Its flesh rapidly becomes floury. It is a mid-season ripening heirloom variety. One really great feature of the Alexander variety is that the fruit do not all ripen at the same time, for a period of about one month they will be ready to harvest, allowing you to extend your harvest. The Alexander apple is red on the sun exposed side and green on the shaded side. The fruit is sweet and has a light fruity aroma, it is good to eat fresh, but it is better for cooking. It makes wonderful apple sauce.

Although it`s taste and texture are not necessarily on a level with other popular varieties, it is still a favourite because of its noble appearence. On the table of fine restaurants it is a star and in the market it is a hot cake.

The tree

The Alexandre apple tree is resistant to apple scab. This is often the case with heirloom varieties as they did not have fungicides in the 1700's to treat their trees! They had to choose the very bests varieties to propagate, and they often made such a great choice that we still propagate them 300 years later. It is also know to have some susceptibility to fireblight. As with all of the other apple trees we sell, it is grafted on a standard size rootstock, meaning that the tree will become full size, an average of 7 meters (23 feet) high. Alexander, unlike most apple varieties, is self-sterile. This means that you need to have another apple tree nearby if you want to get fruit.

The origin

The origin of the Alexander (Malus sp. Alexander) variety is not clear, but most people agree that it was born in Ukraine in the 1700's and that it was brought to England in 1817 by a nurseryman from Hammersmith named Mr. Lee. Mr. Lee then exposed its fruit to the London Horticultural society, the fruit he presented had a diameter of five inches and half and weighed in at 538g.

Originally, in Ukraine, the apple was named Aporta, but Mr. Lee renamed the variety Alexander 1st in honour of the Russian Emperor. The name was then modified and it was called : Grand Alexander, Emperor Alexander, Kaiser Alexander, Beauty of Queen, Russian Emperor, Aport Alexander and Aubertin. Nowadays, most people simply call it Alexander.

Mr. Andre Leroy (1801-1875), a  well known and prized french nurseryman from Angers, asserts having seen an Alexander Apple of 37 cm circonference. Wow!

The Alexander apple variety (Malus  Alexander) is an heirloom variety originating from Ukraine in the 1700's.

The fruit

The Alexander apple is giant. You can make a whole pie using only one apple! It is not a very good keeper, but it will be okay if stored up to two months. Its flesh rapidly becomes floury. It is a mid-season ripening heirloom variety. One really great feature of the Alexander variety is that the fruit do not all ripen at the same time, for a period of about one month they will be ready to harvest, allowing you to extend your harvest. The Alexander apple is red on the sun exposed side and green on the shaded side. The fruit is sweet and has a light fruity aroma, it is good to eat fresh, but it is better for cooking. It makes wonderful apple sauce.

Although it`s taste and texture are not necessarily on a level with other popular varieties, it is still a favourite because of its noble appearence. On the table of fine restaurants it is a star and in the market it is a hot cake.

The tree

The Alexandre apple tree is resistant to apple scab. This is often the case with heirloom varieties as they did not have fungicides in the 1700's to treat their trees! They had to choose the very bests varieties to propagate, and they often made such a great choice that we still propagate them 300 years later. It is also know to have some susceptibility to fireblight. As with all of the other apple trees we sell, it is grafted on a standard size rootstock, meaning that the tree will become full size, an average of 7 meters (23 feet) high. Alexander, unlike most apple varieties, is self-sterile. This means that you need to have another apple tree nearby if you want to get fruit.

The origin

The origin of the Alexander (Malus sp. Alexander) variety is not clear, but most people agree that it was born in Ukraine in the 1700's and that it was brought to England in 1817 by a nurseryman from Hammersmith named Mr. Lee. Mr. Lee then exposed its fruit to the London Horticultural society, the fruit he presented had a diameter of five inches and half and weighed in at 538g.

Originally, in Ukraine, the apple was named Aporta, but Mr. Lee renamed the variety Alexander 1st in honour of the Russian Emperor. The name was then modified and it was called : Grand Alexander, Emperor Alexander, Kaiser Alexander, Beauty of Queen, Russian Emperor, Aport Alexander and Aubertin. Nowadays, most people simply call it Alexander.

Mr. Andre Leroy (1801-1875), a  well known and prized french nurseryman from Angers, asserts having seen an Alexander Apple of 37 cm circonference. Wow!

apple tree 'Cortland' (malus cortland) apple tree 'Cortland' (malus cortland)
apple tree 'Cortland' (malus cortland)

Picture a fresh fruit cup featuring beautiful, snow-white apples. It’s likely made with Cortland, the very best Apple Country salad apple. This great, all-purpose apple was developed at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva in 1898. Sweet, with a hint of tartness, juicy. Excellent for eating, salads, sauces, pies and baking. Good for freezing. Cortland apples are wonderful for kabobs, fruit plates and garnishes because they don't turn brown quickly when cut. ready in September through April. Hardy to zone 4a

Picture a fresh fruit cup featuring beautiful, snow-white apples. It’s likely made with Cortland, the very best Apple Country salad apple. This great, all-purpose apple was developed at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva in 1898. Sweet, with a hint of tartness, juicy. Excellent for eating, salads, sauces, pies and baking. Good for freezing. Cortland apples are wonderful for kabobs, fruit plates and garnishes because they don't turn brown quickly when cut. ready in September through April. Hardy to zone 4a

Sizes:
apple tree 'Empire' (malus empire) apple tree 'Empire' (malus empire)
apple tree 'Empire' (malus empire)

Empire is a cross between two of America’s most popular varieties: McIntosh and Red Delicious. Red Delicious, a chance seedling discovered in Iowa in 1880, provides Empire’s predominantly deep red color and sweetness, but McIntosh gives it a complexity and measure of tartness, as well as a green or yellow blush.

Empire’s juicy white flesh resembles a Mac, but it is firmer and does not bruise easily, like Red Delicious. Empire is great for fresh eating, but is a good cooking apple as well. Developed by R.D. Way at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in 1945, Empire was introduced commercially in 1966. Hardy to zone 4b

Empire is a cross between two of America’s most popular varieties: McIntosh and Red Delicious. Red Delicious, a chance seedling discovered in Iowa in 1880, provides Empire’s predominantly deep red color and sweetness, but McIntosh gives it a complexity and measure of tartness, as well as a green or yellow blush.

Empire’s juicy white flesh resembles a Mac, but it is firmer and does not bruise easily, like Red Delicious. Empire is great for fresh eating, but is a good cooking apple as well. Developed by R.D. Way at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in 1945, Empire was introduced commercially in 1966. Hardy to zone 4b

Sizes:
apple tree 'Fall Delight'
apple tree 'Fall Delight'

Small apple crispy and juicy. Disease resistant. harvest in mid-september. hardy to zone 3a

Small apple crispy and juicy. Disease resistant. harvest in mid-september. hardy to zone 3a

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
apple tree 'Goodland' apple tree 'Goodland'
apple tree 'Goodland'

Goodland is an apple that originates from Manitoba. It is hardy to zone 3 and ready to harvest from mid-August onwards. It is a good apple to eat fresh, but it also makes a wonderful apple sauce.

The fruit

Goodland is a moderately sweet apple with a creamy-green skin and a red blush. With white flesh that is tender and juicy, it is aromatic, has a fine texture, is wonderful as a puree and very good for eating fresh. A good sized apple, averaging 6-8cm in diameter, Goodland apples can keep up to 20 weeks in a cool room. It is an apple that can be harvested from mid-August. To learn how to can your own applesauce safely, visit Food in Jars.

The tree

The Goodland apple tree is hardy to zone 3. It can also be grown in zone 2, but it will probably have some frost injuries in the coldest winters and then need to be pruned. The Goodland apple tree bears vast quantities of fruit every year and has some resistance to fire blight. It will start bearing fruit at a young age.

Origin

The Goodland apple tree variety was developed by Agriculture Canada Research Center in Morden, Manitoba. It was born from an open-pollinated seedling of the Patten Greening apple tree. Before it was named Goodland, it was known as Morden 354. Goodland was selected for commercial purposes in 1925 and then introduced on the market in 1955.

Goodland is an apple that originates from Manitoba. It is hardy to zone 3 and ready to harvest from mid-August onwards. It is a good apple to eat fresh, but it also makes a wonderful apple sauce.

The fruit

Goodland is a moderately sweet apple with a creamy-green skin and a red blush. With white flesh that is tender and juicy, it is aromatic, has a fine texture, is wonderful as a puree and very good for eating fresh. A good sized apple, averaging 6-8cm in diameter, Goodland apples can keep up to 20 weeks in a cool room. It is an apple that can be harvested from mid-August. To learn how to can your own applesauce safely, visit Food in Jars.

The tree

The Goodland apple tree is hardy to zone 3. It can also be grown in zone 2, but it will probably have some frost injuries in the coldest winters and then need to be pruned. The Goodland apple tree bears vast quantities of fruit every year and has some resistance to fire blight. It will start bearing fruit at a young age.

Origin

The Goodland apple tree variety was developed by Agriculture Canada Research Center in Morden, Manitoba. It was born from an open-pollinated seedling of the Patten Greening apple tree. Before it was named Goodland, it was known as Morden 354. Goodland was selected for commercial purposes in 1925 and then introduced on the market in 1955.

apple tree 'Honey crisp' apple tree 'Honey crisp'
apple tree 'Honey crisp'

The Honeycrisp apple, also known in Europe as the Honeycrunch apple, is one of the University of Minnesota's best apples. They are widely grown around the world. Millions have been sold to people who love the well-balanced sweet-tart taste, and explosively crisp, juicy texture. This honey of an apple has a honeyed, mild flavor and a crispness deemed explosive. Juicy and sweet, this popular newcomer is a cross between a Macoun and a Honeygold.

Honeycrisp’s skin is a distinctive mottled red over a yellow background, with coarse flesh. This apple is good for snacking, salads and sauce-making and stores well. Honeycrisp is “college educated,” developed by the University of Minnesota. Supplies are limited but growing with harvest beginning in September. 

Honeycrisp was named the Minnesota State Fruit in 2006. This honor was bestowed for several reasons. It is a great tasting apple. It is a very popular apple. And, it helped revive a declining apple growing industry and brought much needed revenue to small to medium sized, family-run orchards. Because of the broad appeal of Honeycrisp's flavor and texture, it sells at a premium price.

The Honeycrisp apple was even selected as one of the top 25 innovations in over a decade in the 2006 Better World Report. This report, by the Association of University Technology Managers, honors significant academic research and technology transfer that has changed our way of life. It honors developments that have made the world a better place.

Make your world a better place. Try Honeycrisp Apples.

The Honeycrisp apple, also known in Europe as the Honeycrunch apple, is one of the University of Minnesota's best apples. They are widely grown around the world. Millions have been sold to people who love the well-balanced sweet-tart taste, and explosively crisp, juicy texture. This honey of an apple has a honeyed, mild flavor and a crispness deemed explosive. Juicy and sweet, this popular newcomer is a cross between a Macoun and a Honeygold.

Honeycrisp’s skin is a distinctive mottled red over a yellow background, with coarse flesh. This apple is good for snacking, salads and sauce-making and stores well. Honeycrisp is “college educated,” developed by the University of Minnesota. Supplies are limited but growing with harvest beginning in September. 

Honeycrisp was named the Minnesota State Fruit in 2006. This honor was bestowed for several reasons. It is a great tasting apple. It is a very popular apple. And, it helped revive a declining apple growing industry and brought much needed revenue to small to medium sized, family-run orchards. Because of the broad appeal of Honeycrisp's flavor and texture, it sells at a premium price.

The Honeycrisp apple was even selected as one of the top 25 innovations in over a decade in the 2006 Better World Report. This report, by the Association of University Technology Managers, honors significant academic research and technology transfer that has changed our way of life. It honors developments that have made the world a better place.

Make your world a better place. Try Honeycrisp Apples.

Sizes:
apple tree 'Melba' (Malus melba)
apple tree 'Melba' (Malus melba)

Melba is a Canadian high quality cultivar of domesticated apple, which was developed by W. T. Macoun at the Central Experimental Farm, in Ottawa, Ontario by crossing a McIntosh with a Liveland Raspberry apple. It has a yellow skin washed with crimson colour. Flesh is extremely white, firm and crisp. Flavor is sweet with hints of tart. There is also a Red Melba mutation which is more red coloured, and is ripening later in season.

This tree is very productive and can bear fruit at a young age, but has a biennial tendency. Early harvest. Need high skill gardening but highly rewarded. It is mainly used for fresh eating. The fruit doesn't preserve for long time after being harvested. Hardy to zone 3a

Melba is a Canadian high quality cultivar of domesticated apple, which was developed by W. T. Macoun at the Central Experimental Farm, in Ottawa, Ontario by crossing a McIntosh with a Liveland Raspberry apple. It has a yellow skin washed with crimson colour. Flesh is extremely white, firm and crisp. Flavor is sweet with hints of tart. There is also a Red Melba mutation which is more red coloured, and is ripening later in season.

This tree is very productive and can bear fruit at a young age, but has a biennial tendency. Early harvest. Need high skill gardening but highly rewarded. It is mainly used for fresh eating. The fruit doesn't preserve for long time after being harvested. Hardy to zone 3a

apple tree 'Red haralson' apple tree 'Red haralson'
apple tree 'Red haralson'

A medium, red striped apples that are crisp and juicy with a sweet tart flavor. Good keeper. Red Haralson Apples are originally from Minnesota. Zone 3.

A medium, red striped apples that are crisp and juicy with a sweet tart flavor. Good keeper. Red Haralson Apples are originally from Minnesota. Zone 3.

apple tree 'Rouville' apple tree 'Rouville'
apple tree 'Rouville'

Characteristic Value
Height at maturity: 7 meters (23 feet)
Spacing: 9 meters (30 feet)
Hardiness: zone 3b
Soil: light clay, sandu loam and well drained
Sun / shade: always full sun
Flowering: Mid-May
Harvest: Mid-august
Average fruit weight: unknow
Fruit color: green with rose-red face
Years to bear fruit: 3 years
Pollination: need a second tree
Latin name Malus sp. Rouville
Average diameter of fruit: 11 cm

Characteristic Value
Height at maturity: 7 meters (23 feet)
Spacing: 9 meters (30 feet)
Hardiness: zone 3b
Soil: light clay, sandu loam and well drained
Sun / shade: always full sun
Flowering: Mid-May
Harvest: Mid-august
Average fruit weight: unknow
Fruit color: green with rose-red face
Years to bear fruit: 3 years
Pollination: need a second tree
Latin name Malus sp. Rouville
Average diameter of fruit: 11 cm

apple tree 'Royal Gala' apple tree 'Royal Gala'
apple tree 'Royal Gala'

Yes, it would seem even apples have royalty. Presenting the Royal Gala – a crisp, firm, bright red or orange patterned fruit with a yellow background. Small to medium sized with a thinner skin, this sweet, succulent apple is a cross between a Golden Delicious and Kidd’s Orange Red. Originating in New Zealand in the 1920s, it’s a favourite around the world.

Royal Galas are best eaten on their own or in a salad. But they’re also good for pies, baking and sauces.
 

Yes, it would seem even apples have royalty. Presenting the Royal Gala – a crisp, firm, bright red or orange patterned fruit with a yellow background. Small to medium sized with a thinner skin, this sweet, succulent apple is a cross between a Golden Delicious and Kidd’s Orange Red. Originating in New Zealand in the 1920s, it’s a favourite around the world.

Royal Galas are best eaten on their own or in a salad. But they’re also good for pies, baking and sauces.
 

apple tree 'Spencer' apple tree 'Spencer'
apple tree 'Spencer'

Ripening in mid- to late September, Spencer is a conical apple, nearly solid red-pink in color, with green highlights. Its flesh is crisp, juicy, and more sweet than tart, though less sweet than its Golden Delicious parent (Spencer’s other parent — surprise! — is McIntosh). Spencer is an all-purpose apple, especially good in pies and sauce. It does not have a lengthy storage life.

Spencer was also discovered by R. C. Palmer in 1926 — the same year as Spartan — but it took considerably longer, until 1959, for it to reach the marketplace.

Before it had an apple-breeding program, Canada produced several heirloom varieties of note besides McIntosh — including one of McIntosh’s parents, Snow apple.

Ripening in mid- to late September, Spencer is a conical apple, nearly solid red-pink in color, with green highlights. Its flesh is crisp, juicy, and more sweet than tart, though less sweet than its Golden Delicious parent (Spencer’s other parent — surprise! — is McIntosh). Spencer is an all-purpose apple, especially good in pies and sauce. It does not have a lengthy storage life.

Spencer was also discovered by R. C. Palmer in 1926 — the same year as Spartan — but it took considerably longer, until 1959, for it to reach the marketplace.

Before it had an apple-breeding program, Canada produced several heirloom varieties of note besides McIntosh — including one of McIntosh’s parents, Snow apple.

Apple tree 'Sweet Sixteen'
Apple tree 'Sweet Sixteen'

The Sweet Sixteen apple tree offers a unique taste with a blend of spice, sweet, vanilla and cherry flavours. It is a must taste!

The fruit

The Sweet Sixteen is a medium sized, sweet flavoured apple, with an acidic hint, that is crisp and very juicy. Yellowish in colour, and known for its unique taste (ranging from hints of cider, spices, anise, cherry, vanilla bourbon and nuttiness to name a few) it's an excellent apple to eat fresh but also gives good results when cooked. The taste is more refined when the summer is not too hot. Its fruit matures on a three week period and will keep for 1-2 months in a cool room.

The tree

The Sweet Sixteen apple tree has some resistance to most diseases. Hardy to zone 3b, it's quite vigorous and easy to grow.

Origin

William H Alderman The Sweet Sixteen apple can be traced back to the work of Dr. William H. Alderman. In 1936, at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Dr. Alderman crossed the varieties Minnesota 447 (also known as Frostbite) and Northern Spy, to produce an apple treethat he named MN1593. In 1947, a series of tests on the MN1593 variety were carried out. This continued for 31 years until Sweet Sixteen was released to nurseries in 1978. You can see Dr. Alderman in the photo. Just as we are, Dr. Alderman was also promoting standard rootstock on apple trees when growing in northern areas.

The Sweet Sixteen apple tree offers a unique taste with a blend of spice, sweet, vanilla and cherry flavours. It is a must taste!

The fruit

The Sweet Sixteen is a medium sized, sweet flavoured apple, with an acidic hint, that is crisp and very juicy. Yellowish in colour, and known for its unique taste (ranging from hints of cider, spices, anise, cherry, vanilla bourbon and nuttiness to name a few) it's an excellent apple to eat fresh but also gives good results when cooked. The taste is more refined when the summer is not too hot. Its fruit matures on a three week period and will keep for 1-2 months in a cool room.

The tree

The Sweet Sixteen apple tree has some resistance to most diseases. Hardy to zone 3b, it's quite vigorous and easy to grow.

Origin

William H Alderman The Sweet Sixteen apple can be traced back to the work of Dr. William H. Alderman. In 1936, at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Dr. Alderman crossed the varieties Minnesota 447 (also known as Frostbite) and Northern Spy, to produce an apple treethat he named MN1593. In 1947, a series of tests on the MN1593 variety were carried out. This continued for 31 years until Sweet Sixteen was released to nurseries in 1978. You can see Dr. Alderman in the photo. Just as we are, Dr. Alderman was also promoting standard rootstock on apple trees when growing in northern areas.

apple tree 'Trent'
apple tree 'Trent'

Trent apple tree - Zone 4 - A McIntosh seedling

Trent is a red apple that can be kept for six months. The tree is hardy to zone 4 and is resistant to scab and fire blight. The Trent apple is a McIntosh seedling originating from Ontario.

The fruit

The Trent is a medium to large sized apple and its shape is round to slightly ellipsoid. It's a completely red apple with a crispy firm flesh that is cream in colour with a hint of light green. It's a good quality apple with a moderately acidic taste. It is best used fresh or processed. While not the most bountiful producer, the apples are suitable for juicing. An extremely good keeper, the apples can be stored for 6 months.  It is ready to harvest around mid-October.  Our thanks to Marc Perron for the photo.

The tree

The Trent apple tree is vigorous, productive and it produces early. Trent is loved because of its resistance to scab and fire blight.

Origin

The original Trent apple tree was a cross between the McIntosh and R18T40 [Jonathan x (Rome Beauty x M. floribunda 821 sib)] varieties produced by the Agriculture Canada Research Station in Ottawa.  It was introduced into Ontario in 1979 and was previously known by the name Ottawa-531.

Trent apple tree - Zone 4 - A McIntosh seedling

Trent is a red apple that can be kept for six months. The tree is hardy to zone 4 and is resistant to scab and fire blight. The Trent apple is a McIntosh seedling originating from Ontario.

The fruit

The Trent is a medium to large sized apple and its shape is round to slightly ellipsoid. It's a completely red apple with a crispy firm flesh that is cream in colour with a hint of light green. It's a good quality apple with a moderately acidic taste. It is best used fresh or processed. While not the most bountiful producer, the apples are suitable for juicing. An extremely good keeper, the apples can be stored for 6 months.  It is ready to harvest around mid-October.  Our thanks to Marc Perron for the photo.

The tree

The Trent apple tree is vigorous, productive and it produces early. Trent is loved because of its resistance to scab and fire blight.

Origin

The original Trent apple tree was a cross between the McIntosh and R18T40 [Jonathan x (Rome Beauty x M. floribunda 821 sib)] varieties produced by the Agriculture Canada Research Station in Ottawa.  It was introduced into Ontario in 1979 and was previously known by the name Ottawa-531.

apple tree 'Winter banana'  (malus winter banana)
apple tree 'Winter banana' (malus winter banana)

This is an apple that can certainly be called the “Fairest of the fair”, the sweet and lovely Winter Banana. With its smooth, waxy, pale yellow skin and pinkish-red blush, the Winter Banana is an extremely attractive apple as well as a beneficial addition to the home orchard. Winter Banana is a diploid, self-fertile apple, meaning that it not only pollinates itself, but also serves as a very effective pollinizer for other apple trees. Very few apples are self-fertile like Winter Banana and so require pollen from other apple varieties for proper cross-pollination and successful fruit production. Self-fertile varieties such as Winter Banana, Cox’s Orange Pippin and Grimes Golden can play an important role in helping increase production and yield in smaller orchards with limited varieties.

Winter Banana originated around 1875-76 on the farm of David Flory of Cass County, Indiana and was introduced commercially in 1890. (One of its nicknames is “Flory”). It is a fine fresh-eating apple with a mild, sweet flavor and is best enjoyed as a dessert apple. The mildness of its flavor makes it less desirable as a cooking or baking apple. It is a highly aromatic apple with a pleasant, perfumed aroma that some people discern as banana. Not everyone can detect the aroma of bananas and only the highest-quality, well-ripened fruits will have this fragrance. I have enjoyed Winter Banana on numerous occasions and seldom detect the “essence” of banana but do recall a time in 1990 when our Winter Banana tree was hanging heavy with an especially abundant crop of beautiful, pink and golden-yellow, aromatic fruit. I was walking up to the orchard on a warm day in early October and well before I could actually see the tree, I detected the heavy, sweet perfume of fresh bananas permeating the entire orchard! I picked an especially attractive apple from the tree, enjoying the cool feel of the fruit in my hand on that warm early fall afternoon. I held it close to my nose and inhaled deeply to savor the full, rich aroma of ripe bananas. What a marvelous experience! To this day I have not enjoyed a Winter Banana apple that matched the sensory experience of that one apple on that particular day!

This is an apple that can certainly be called the “Fairest of the fair”, the sweet and lovely Winter Banana. With its smooth, waxy, pale yellow skin and pinkish-red blush, the Winter Banana is an extremely attractive apple as well as a beneficial addition to the home orchard. Winter Banana is a diploid, self-fertile apple, meaning that it not only pollinates itself, but also serves as a very effective pollinizer for other apple trees. Very few apples are self-fertile like Winter Banana and so require pollen from other apple varieties for proper cross-pollination and successful fruit production. Self-fertile varieties such as Winter Banana, Cox’s Orange Pippin and Grimes Golden can play an important role in helping increase production and yield in smaller orchards with limited varieties.

Winter Banana originated around 1875-76 on the farm of David Flory of Cass County, Indiana and was introduced commercially in 1890. (One of its nicknames is “Flory”). It is a fine fresh-eating apple with a mild, sweet flavor and is best enjoyed as a dessert apple. The mildness of its flavor makes it less desirable as a cooking or baking apple. It is a highly aromatic apple with a pleasant, perfumed aroma that some people discern as banana. Not everyone can detect the aroma of bananas and only the highest-quality, well-ripened fruits will have this fragrance. I have enjoyed Winter Banana on numerous occasions and seldom detect the “essence” of banana but do recall a time in 1990 when our Winter Banana tree was hanging heavy with an especially abundant crop of beautiful, pink and golden-yellow, aromatic fruit. I was walking up to the orchard on a warm day in early October and well before I could actually see the tree, I detected the heavy, sweet perfume of fresh bananas permeating the entire orchard! I picked an especially attractive apple from the tree, enjoying the cool feel of the fruit in my hand on that warm early fall afternoon. I held it close to my nose and inhaled deeply to savor the full, rich aroma of ripe bananas. What a marvelous experience! To this day I have not enjoyed a Winter Banana apple that matched the sensory experience of that one apple on that particular day!

Apple tree Nova Easygro
Sizes:
Apricot 'Goldrich' (prunus armeniaca) Apricot 'Goldrich' (prunus armeniaca)
Apricot 'Goldrich' (prunus armeniaca)

Out of stock, Available in 2018

Ideal for pot culture in colder zones. Protect tehm from the cold.

Goldrich fruit are large and oval, with firm, deep orange flesh and a fine texture, and has good flavour and quality. Goldrich trees are vigorous and productive. Only partially self-fertile and should be cross-pollinated with Rival or Moorpark for best fruit set.
 

Out of stock, Available in 2018

Ideal for pot culture in colder zones. Protect tehm from the cold.

Goldrich fruit are large and oval, with firm, deep orange flesh and a fine texture, and has good flavour and quality. Goldrich trees are vigorous and productive. Only partially self-fertile and should be cross-pollinated with Rival or Moorpark for best fruit set.
 

Apricot 'harcot' (prunus armeniaca) Apricot 'harcot' (prunus armeniaca)
Apricot 'harcot' (prunus armeniaca)

Out of stock, Available in 2018

Ideal for pot culture in colder zones.

Tree selected from Canada. Frost hardy late bloom. Resists brown rot and perennial canker. Medium to large fruit with sweet, juicy, rich flavor - one of the best. hardy in zone 4b but we recommend more a zone 5a

An early apricot with an attractive red blush. It has good fruit quality for roadsides markets and direct fruit sales, but unsuitable for shipping or processing. Harcot has a sweet kernel, but this characteristic has been inconsistent at Vineland research station.

Out of stock, Available in 2018

Ideal for pot culture in colder zones.

Tree selected from Canada. Frost hardy late bloom. Resists brown rot and perennial canker. Medium to large fruit with sweet, juicy, rich flavor - one of the best. hardy in zone 4b but we recommend more a zone 5a

An early apricot with an attractive red blush. It has good fruit quality for roadsides markets and direct fruit sales, but unsuitable for shipping or processing. Harcot has a sweet kernel, but this characteristic has been inconsistent at Vineland research station.

Asian pear Shinko, (Pyrus Spp) Asian pear Shinko, (Pyrus Spp)
Asian pear Shinko, (Pyrus Spp)

Shinko ripens mid season, later than the early ripening Hosui. An excellent keeper, Shinko stores well into the winter. Shinko has a crisp, refreshingly sweet flavor and is a valuable landscape addition because of its profuse white bloom, grey bark and green shiny leaves and golden fruits. Need a common pear  tree in bloom or a second asian pear for a cross pollination. Zones 4-9.

Shinko ripens mid season, later than the early ripening Hosui. An excellent keeper, Shinko stores well into the winter. Shinko has a crisp, refreshingly sweet flavor and is a valuable landscape addition because of its profuse white bloom, grey bark and green shiny leaves and golden fruits. Need a common pear  tree in bloom or a second asian pear for a cross pollination. Zones 4-9.

Sizes:
Black chokeberry (aronia melanocarpa) Black chokeberry (aronia melanocarpa)
Black chokeberry (aronia melanocarpa)

Aronia is a genus of deciduous shrubs, the chokeberries, in the family Rosaceae, native to eastern North America and most commonly found in wet woods and swamps. Chokeberries are cultivated as ornamental plants and as food products. The sour berries can be eaten raw off the bush, but are more frequently processed. They can be found in wine, jam, syrup, juice, soft spreads, tea, salsa, chili starters, extracts, beer, ice cream, gummies and tinctures.The name "chokeberry" comes from the astringency of the fruits, which create a sensation making one's mouth pucker. Aronia berries and chokecherries are both high in polyphenolic compounds, such as anthocyanins, yet the two plants are distantly related within the Rosaceae family.

Black chokeberry, Aronia melanocarpa (Photinia melanocarpa), tends to be smaller, rarely exceeding 1 m tall and 3 m wide, and spreads readily by root sprouts. The leaves are smaller, not more than 6-cm wide, with terminal glands on leaf teeth and a glabrous underside. The flowers are white, 1.5 cm wide, with glabrous sepals. The fruit is black, 6–9 mm wide, not persisting into winter. Aronia is considered cold hardy and heat tolerant in USDA Zones 2b to 8, same for canadian hardiness map. Aronia plants grow well both in orchard-type rows or set as landscape elements, including several varieties in 3 to 12 foot heights. Aronia melanocarpa (black chokeberry) has attracted scientific interest due to its deep purple, almost black pigmentation that arises from dense contents of polyphenols, especially anthocyanins. Total polyphenol content is 1752 mg per 100 g in fresh berries,anthocyanin content is 1480 mg per 100 g, and proanthocyanidin concentration is 664 mg per 100 g.These values are among the highest measured in plants to date.

 

Aronia is a genus of deciduous shrubs, the chokeberries, in the family Rosaceae, native to eastern North America and most commonly found in wet woods and swamps. Chokeberries are cultivated as ornamental plants and as food products. The sour berries can be eaten raw off the bush, but are more frequently processed. They can be found in wine, jam, syrup, juice, soft spreads, tea, salsa, chili starters, extracts, beer, ice cream, gummies and tinctures.The name "chokeberry" comes from the astringency of the fruits, which create a sensation making one's mouth pucker. Aronia berries and chokecherries are both high in polyphenolic compounds, such as anthocyanins, yet the two plants are distantly related within the Rosaceae family.

Black chokeberry, Aronia melanocarpa (Photinia melanocarpa), tends to be smaller, rarely exceeding 1 m tall and 3 m wide, and spreads readily by root sprouts. The leaves are smaller, not more than 6-cm wide, with terminal glands on leaf teeth and a glabrous underside. The flowers are white, 1.5 cm wide, with glabrous sepals. The fruit is black, 6–9 mm wide, not persisting into winter. Aronia is considered cold hardy and heat tolerant in USDA Zones 2b to 8, same for canadian hardiness map. Aronia plants grow well both in orchard-type rows or set as landscape elements, including several varieties in 3 to 12 foot heights. Aronia melanocarpa (black chokeberry) has attracted scientific interest due to its deep purple, almost black pigmentation that arises from dense contents of polyphenols, especially anthocyanins. Total polyphenol content is 1752 mg per 100 g in fresh berries,anthocyanin content is 1480 mg per 100 g, and proanthocyanidin concentration is 664 mg per 100 g.These values are among the highest measured in plants to date.

 

Black raspberry 'Jewel' (Rubus occidentalis) Black raspberry 'Jewel' (Rubus occidentalis)
Black raspberry 'Jewel' (Rubus occidentalis)

Standard, black raspberry. Ideal for canning or making jams and preserves.Vigorous, upright plants produce large, firm berries with rich raspberry flavor. The fruits ripen from red to black in early to midsummer, and the crops are plentiful. It is reliable, hardy, and withstands cold winters well.

Standard, black raspberry. Ideal for canning or making jams and preserves.Vigorous, upright plants produce large, firm berries with rich raspberry flavor. The fruits ripen from red to black in early to midsummer, and the crops are plentiful. It is reliable, hardy, and withstands cold winters well.

Blackcurrant 'Tatiana' Blackcurrant 'Tatiana'
Blackcurrant 'Tatiana'

The unique sweet-tart taste of currants has been cherished for many years in Europe. Currants are not well known to gardeners. Red currants are among the most beautiful of fruits. Their bright, shiny red clusters enhance any dish to which they are added.

Amazing but true: black currants have 5 times the Vitamin C content of oranges by weight! Black Currants have a strong flavor that is highly prized in Europe. Most Americans and canadians don’t like their taste eaten fresh. However, they are excellent used in making jams, syrups or dried as "raisins". Pollination: Self-pollinating, Except black currants are partially self fruitful but sometimes make larger crops with another black currant as a pollenizer. Plant spacing: 4 feet apart. Size at maturity: 3-5 feet tall. Hardiness: Zones 3 minimum. Exposure: Sun or partial shade. Ripening: July. Life expectancy: 15 to 30 yrs.

The unique sweet-tart taste of currants has been cherished for many years in Europe. Currants are not well known to gardeners. Red currants are among the most beautiful of fruits. Their bright, shiny red clusters enhance any dish to which they are added.

Amazing but true: black currants have 5 times the Vitamin C content of oranges by weight! Black Currants have a strong flavor that is highly prized in Europe. Most Americans and canadians don’t like their taste eaten fresh. However, they are excellent used in making jams, syrups or dried as "raisins". Pollination: Self-pollinating, Except black currants are partially self fruitful but sometimes make larger crops with another black currant as a pollenizer. Plant spacing: 4 feet apart. Size at maturity: 3-5 feet tall. Hardiness: Zones 3 minimum. Exposure: Sun or partial shade. Ripening: July. Life expectancy: 15 to 30 yrs.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry ''Bluecrop'' size 1 gallon
Blueberry ''Bluecrop'' size 1 gallon

A great blueberry plant for colder climates zone (4b-5a). Produces big clusters of large, all-purpose berries — perfect in salads or pies, or served with cream. Developed in 1934, introduced in 1941. Cold-hardy. Ripens late July. Self-pollinating, but will yield larger crops if pollinated with other varieties.

A great blueberry plant for colder climates zone (4b-5a). Produces big clusters of large, all-purpose berries — perfect in salads or pies, or served with cream. Developed in 1934, introduced in 1941. Cold-hardy. Ripens late July. Self-pollinating, but will yield larger crops if pollinated with other varieties.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry ''Bluejay'' size 1 gallon
Blueberry ''Bluejay'' size 1 gallon

Like having a fresh blueberry stand in your garden! Enjoy long harvests of flavorful blueberries that hang well right on the bush. These vigorous plants also make a lovely addition to any yard, especially in fall, when the leaves turn yellow and orange. Perfect for northern gardeners. Resists cracking. Introduced in 1978. Cold-hardy to zone 4a-4b. Ripens in July. Self-pollinating.

Like having a fresh blueberry stand in your garden! Enjoy long harvests of flavorful blueberries that hang well right on the bush. These vigorous plants also make a lovely addition to any yard, especially in fall, when the leaves turn yellow and orange. Perfect for northern gardeners. Resists cracking. Introduced in 1978. Cold-hardy to zone 4a-4b. Ripens in July. Self-pollinating.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry ''Chandler'' size 1 gallon Blueberry ''Chandler'' size 1 gallon
Blueberry ''Chandler'' size 1 gallon

The world's largest blueberry.

Chandler is a favorite in the home garden and is famous for having the world's largest blueberries. It is late ripening and has an extended harvest period. Susceptible to hard freeze during winter. Hardy in minimum zone 4b-5a.  not very resistant to very cold winter and low snow cover.

The world's largest blueberry.

Chandler is a favorite in the home garden and is famous for having the world's largest blueberries. It is late ripening and has an extended harvest period. Susceptible to hard freeze during winter. Hardy in minimum zone 4b-5a.  not very resistant to very cold winter and low snow cover.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry ''Duke'' size 1 gallon
Blueberry ''Duke'' size 1 gallon

Productive and decorative! A handsome bush with three seasons of interest: white, pink-tinged spring flowers; large, light blue summer fruit; and vibrant orange and yellow fall foliage. The large berries, often reaching the size of quarters, are produced in great abundance and have a delicious, tangy-sweet flavor. Blooms late to avoid spring frosts. Also makes a very attractive and decorative hedge! Early season. Originates from Beltsville, Maryland, introduced in 1985. Cold-hardy to zone 4b, avoid zone 4a or lower because of cold winters in this zone. Ripens mid- July. Self-pollinating. Not very resistant to very cold winter and low snow cover.

Productive and decorative! A handsome bush with three seasons of interest: white, pink-tinged spring flowers; large, light blue summer fruit; and vibrant orange and yellow fall foliage. The large berries, often reaching the size of quarters, are produced in great abundance and have a delicious, tangy-sweet flavor. Blooms late to avoid spring frosts. Also makes a very attractive and decorative hedge! Early season. Originates from Beltsville, Maryland, introduced in 1985. Cold-hardy to zone 4b, avoid zone 4a or lower because of cold winters in this zone. Ripens mid- July. Self-pollinating. Not very resistant to very cold winter and low snow cover.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry ''Elizabeth'' size 1 gallon
Blueberry ''Elizabeth'' size 1 gallon

Giant Berries Bursting With Flavor

Enormous berries with a rich mellow-sweet flavor make Elizabeth a favorite of leading chefs. You will love it, too! Enjoy fresh berries longer—ripens over a very long season, from mid July to late in the summer. Mature bush reaches 6 ft. tall with an upright, spreading habit. Zones 4-9.

Giant Berries Bursting With Flavor

Enormous berries with a rich mellow-sweet flavor make Elizabeth a favorite of leading chefs. You will love it, too! Enjoy fresh berries longer—ripens over a very long season, from mid July to late in the summer. Mature bush reaches 6 ft. tall with an upright, spreading habit. Zones 4-9.

Blueberry ''Légacy'' size 1 gallon
Blueberry ''Légacy'' size 1 gallon

One of the best tasting blueberries;a favorite from California to the Northeast.

Legacy is a very productive blueberry that produces firm, sweet, aromatic fruit for an extended period in late mid-season. Fruit is large and stores well; plants are vigorous, upright and have good disease resistance. Legacy is one of several noteworthy blueberries from the USDA breeding program. Hardy to zone 5a

One of the best tasting blueberries;a favorite from California to the Northeast.

Legacy is a very productive blueberry that produces firm, sweet, aromatic fruit for an extended period in late mid-season. Fruit is large and stores well; plants are vigorous, upright and have good disease resistance. Legacy is one of several noteworthy blueberries from the USDA breeding program. Hardy to zone 5a

Blueberry ''Nelson'' size 1 gallon
Blueberry ''Nelson'' size 1 gallon

Late-season variety from the Michigan State breeding program.

The Nelson Blueberry, Vaccinium corymbosum 'Nelson', is a variety of highbush blueberry that produces outstanding fruit on an ornamental bush. It would look great in a mixed border, or planted within a grouping of fruit trees.The berries of this plant are often considered particularly large and sweet. They ripen mid-summer and provide a harvest that will be irresistible to both you and your feathered friends. In fact, nothing compares to the succulent burst of flavor that follows the warm gush of a freshly-picked blueberry straight from the bush!

The delicious berries may be the highlight of your blueberry bush, but it has a lot to offer both before and after the harvest. Lovely pink-blushed, white blossoms precede the berries in the spring, and fiery shades of orange and red decorate the branches in autumn.

Even in winter, when the branches are bare, their purplish-red shade brightens the winter landscape. The fruit is terrific right off the shrub, but also great in pies, preserves and a variety of other culinary dishes. The berries are also a veritable feast for birds and other wildlife. An abundant harvest of delicious fruit on a lovely bush with four-season interest, the Nelson is a lovely choice for any home garden or landscape.

Late-season variety from the Michigan State breeding program.

The Nelson Blueberry, Vaccinium corymbosum 'Nelson', is a variety of highbush blueberry that produces outstanding fruit on an ornamental bush. It would look great in a mixed border, or planted within a grouping of fruit trees.The berries of this plant are often considered particularly large and sweet. They ripen mid-summer and provide a harvest that will be irresistible to both you and your feathered friends. In fact, nothing compares to the succulent burst of flavor that follows the warm gush of a freshly-picked blueberry straight from the bush!

The delicious berries may be the highlight of your blueberry bush, but it has a lot to offer both before and after the harvest. Lovely pink-blushed, white blossoms precede the berries in the spring, and fiery shades of orange and red decorate the branches in autumn.

Even in winter, when the branches are bare, their purplish-red shade brightens the winter landscape. The fruit is terrific right off the shrub, but also great in pies, preserves and a variety of other culinary dishes. The berries are also a veritable feast for birds and other wildlife. An abundant harvest of delicious fruit on a lovely bush with four-season interest, the Nelson is a lovely choice for any home garden or landscape.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry ''Northland'' size 1 gallon
Blueberry ''Northland'' size 1 gallon

Description in english coming soon

Description in english coming soon

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry ''Toro'' size 1 gallon
Blueberry ''Toro'' size 1 gallon

Northern Highbush fruiting in mid-season.

Considered to be one of the most beautiful blueberry plants with bright red foliage in fall, the large and sweet berries that form in clusters make Toro an exceptional home garden variety. Fruit flavor is rarely tart, and berries are firm, excellent for desserts. Suitable to minimum zone 4b but not very resistant to very cold winter and low snow cover.

Northern Highbush fruiting in mid-season.

Considered to be one of the most beautiful blueberry plants with bright red foliage in fall, the large and sweet berries that form in clusters make Toro an exceptional home garden variety. Fruit flavor is rarely tart, and berries are firm, excellent for desserts. Suitable to minimum zone 4b but not very resistant to very cold winter and low snow cover.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry 'Berkeley' 4 years
Blueberry 'Berkeley' 4 years

Large 4 years old blueberry plants already fruiting in 2017 for gardeners hurry to harvest their own blueberry in 2017 !

mi-season fruits and medium to large size fruits for zone 4b

Large 4 years old blueberry plants already fruiting in 2017 for gardeners hurry to harvest their own blueberry in 2017 !

mi-season fruits and medium to large size fruits for zone 4b

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry 'blueray' 4 years
Blueberry 'blueray' 4 years

Large 4 years old blueberry plants already fruiting in 2017 for gardeners hurry to harvest their own blueberry in 2017 !

Early producer of medium to large size fruits for zone 4b

Large 4 years old blueberry plants already fruiting in 2017 for gardeners hurry to harvest their own blueberry in 2017 !

Early producer of medium to large size fruits for zone 4b

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry 'Spartan' 4 years
Blueberry 'Spartan' 4 years

Large 4 years old blueberry plants already fruiting in 2017 for gardeners hurry to harvest their own blueberry in 2017 !

Early producer of medium to large size fruits for zone 4b

Large 4 years old blueberry plants already fruiting in 2017 for gardeners hurry to harvest their own blueberry in 2017 !

Early producer of medium to large size fruits for zone 4b

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Blueberry Patriot
Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Canadian serviceberry (amelanchier canadensis) Canadian serviceberry (amelanchier canadensis)
Canadian serviceberry (amelanchier canadensis)

Canadian serviceberry is a species of Amelanchier native to eastern North America in Canada from Newfoundland west to southern Ontario, and in the United States from Maine south to Alabama. It is largely restricted to wet sites, particularly on the Atlantic Coastal Plain, growing at altitudes from sea level up to 200 m.

It is a deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 5 cm to 8 m tall with one to many stems and a narrow, fastigiate crown. The leaves are alternate, simple, ovate to ovate-oblong, 1–5.5 cm long and 1.8–2.8 cm broad with a rounded to sub-acute apex. The flowers are produced in early spring in loose racemes 4–6 cm long at the ends of the branches; each raceme has four to ten flowers. The flower has five white petals 7.6–11 mm long and 2–4 mm broad. The fruit is a pome, 7–10 mm diameter, dark purple when ripe; it is edible and sweet. Fruits become ripe in June and July in its native range. It is used as a medicinal plant, food, and ornamental plant. It is sometimes made into bonsai.

 

Canadian serviceberry is a species of Amelanchier native to eastern North America in Canada from Newfoundland west to southern Ontario, and in the United States from Maine south to Alabama. It is largely restricted to wet sites, particularly on the Atlantic Coastal Plain, growing at altitudes from sea level up to 200 m.

It is a deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 5 cm to 8 m tall with one to many stems and a narrow, fastigiate crown. The leaves are alternate, simple, ovate to ovate-oblong, 1–5.5 cm long and 1.8–2.8 cm broad with a rounded to sub-acute apex. The flowers are produced in early spring in loose racemes 4–6 cm long at the ends of the branches; each raceme has four to ten flowers. The flower has five white petals 7.6–11 mm long and 2–4 mm broad. The fruit is a pome, 7–10 mm diameter, dark purple when ripe; it is edible and sweet. Fruits become ripe in June and July in its native range. It is used as a medicinal plant, food, and ornamental plant. It is sometimes made into bonsai.

 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Common elderberry (Sambucus canadensis) Common elderberry (Sambucus canadensis)
Common elderberry (Sambucus canadensis)

Culture

Grow in average, medium to wet, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Prefers moist, humusy soils. Spreads by root suckers to form colonies. Prune out dead or weakened stems in early spring.

Noteworthy Characteristics

American elderberry is a stoloniferous, north-eastern america native, deciduous shrub which typically grows 5-12' tall and occurs on streambanks, moist woodlands, thickets, fence rows and roadsides throughout the State. Large, terminal, flat-topped clusters of small, fragrant, white flowers appear in spring and are followed by clusters of dark purple to black, berry-like fruits (drupes) in late summer to fall. Fruit may be used to make preserves, jellies, pies and wine. Fruit is also attractive to wildlife. Pinnately compound bright green leaves (5-11 leaflets each).

Garden Uses

Perhaps best when massed in naturalized areas where suckering spread is acceptable. Also effective in shrub borders, roadside plantings, wet or low areas, as a screen or as part of a native plant garden.

Culture

Grow in average, medium to wet, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Prefers moist, humusy soils. Spreads by root suckers to form colonies. Prune out dead or weakened stems in early spring.

Noteworthy Characteristics

American elderberry is a stoloniferous, north-eastern america native, deciduous shrub which typically grows 5-12' tall and occurs on streambanks, moist woodlands, thickets, fence rows and roadsides throughout the State. Large, terminal, flat-topped clusters of small, fragrant, white flowers appear in spring and are followed by clusters of dark purple to black, berry-like fruits (drupes) in late summer to fall. Fruit may be used to make preserves, jellies, pies and wine. Fruit is also attractive to wildlife. Pinnately compound bright green leaves (5-11 leaflets each).

Garden Uses

Perhaps best when massed in naturalized areas where suckering spread is acceptable. Also effective in shrub borders, roadside plantings, wet or low areas, as a screen or as part of a native plant garden.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Crabapple 'Dolgo' Crabapple 'Dolgo'
Crabapple 'Dolgo'

Malus Pink Glow, also known as Malus Dolgo, is named for its elongated dusky pink fruits, which form in plum-like clusters in September. The fruit is on the larger size for a crab apple, making it easy to use in the kitchen - it is perfect for crab apple jelly and a good source of pectin for other fruit jellies. The blossom is plain white but borne in profusion early in the apple-blossom season, making Pink Glow an excellent pollinator for all early-flowering apple varieties. Very hardy and cold tolerant, we can grow Dolgo crab apple in zone 3a easily.

Malus Pink Glow, also known as Malus Dolgo, is named for its elongated dusky pink fruits, which form in plum-like clusters in September. The fruit is on the larger size for a crab apple, making it easy to use in the kitchen - it is perfect for crab apple jelly and a good source of pectin for other fruit jellies. The blossom is plain white but borne in profusion early in the apple-blossom season, making Pink Glow an excellent pollinator for all early-flowering apple varieties. Very hardy and cold tolerant, we can grow Dolgo crab apple in zone 3a easily.

Female Kiwi Chung Bai (A.Arguta)
Female Kiwi Chung Bai (A.Arguta)

A new hardy arguta female kiwi selected from Korea. The vines have high vigor and very productive. Firm fruits are large nickel to quarter size and are heart-shaped to round. The plants are extremely hardy in cold climates. The flavor of the fruit is mostly sweet, with very little acidity. Male pollinator is Meader. Hardiness Zones 4-7.

A new hardy arguta female kiwi selected from Korea. The vines have high vigor and very productive. Firm fruits are large nickel to quarter size and are heart-shaped to round. The plants are extremely hardy in cold climates. The flavor of the fruit is mostly sweet, with very little acidity. Male pollinator is Meader. Hardiness Zones 4-7.

Sizes:
female Kiwi Michigan State (A. Arguta)
female Kiwi Michigan State (A. Arguta)

This valuable, very productive variety, Michigan State Hardy Kiwi is prized for its exceptionally large fruit and delicious flavor. Michigan State’s lime green fruit can weigh up to 1 oz.

If you like Fuzzy Kiwi, you’ll love this new and delectable fruit. Sparkling like green or red jewels, each very sweet fruit is packed with flavor. While smaller than Fuzzy Kiwi, you can eat the fuzzless Hardy Kiwi fruit like grapes, tender skin and all. Hardy to minus 25 degress F., or below and free of pest and disease problems, you can harvest 100lbs or more of the fruit from one Hardy Kiwi plant.

Hardy Kiwi like half dat to full sun and well-drained soil. A male plant is required for pollination and one male plant can pollinate up to 8 female plants. Hardy Kiwi ripens in mid to late September. The plants need a strong trellis and spread 10-12 ft when mature. They usually begin bearing 3-4 years after planting.

This valuable, very productive variety, Michigan State Hardy Kiwi is prized for its exceptionally large fruit and delicious flavor. Michigan State’s lime green fruit can weigh up to 1 oz.

If you like Fuzzy Kiwi, you’ll love this new and delectable fruit. Sparkling like green or red jewels, each very sweet fruit is packed with flavor. While smaller than Fuzzy Kiwi, you can eat the fuzzless Hardy Kiwi fruit like grapes, tender skin and all. Hardy to minus 25 degress F., or below and free of pest and disease problems, you can harvest 100lbs or more of the fruit from one Hardy Kiwi plant.

Hardy Kiwi like half dat to full sun and well-drained soil. A male plant is required for pollination and one male plant can pollinate up to 8 female plants. Hardy Kiwi ripens in mid to late September. The plants need a strong trellis and spread 10-12 ft when mature. They usually begin bearing 3-4 years after planting.

Sizes:
Female Kiwi September Sun (A. Kolomikta) Female Kiwi September Sun (A. Kolomikta)
Female Kiwi September Sun (A. Kolomikta)

A large fruiting selection of the Russian species Actinidia kolomikta. Can be planted 6' apart and in partial shade. Fruit is earlier than A. arguta and smaller. The leaves are maple red in summer and mixed with green. Hardy to -35°C. Zones 3-7 Space trellised 10' apart. Need a A. Kolomkta for the pollination.

Produces good crops of medium size, sweet and flavorful fruit and is also prized for its colorful foliage. Make sure to pair with a Pasha™ male Arctic beauty kiwi for pollination or a non selected male is also fully suitable. One male will pollinate up to 8 female kiwis.

A large fruiting selection of the Russian species Actinidia kolomikta. Can be planted 6' apart and in partial shade. Fruit is earlier than A. arguta and smaller. The leaves are maple red in summer and mixed with green. Hardy to -35°C. Zones 3-7 Space trellised 10' apart. Need a A. Kolomkta for the pollination.

Produces good crops of medium size, sweet and flavorful fruit and is also prized for its colorful foliage. Make sure to pair with a Pasha™ male Arctic beauty kiwi for pollination or a non selected male is also fully suitable. One male will pollinate up to 8 female kiwis.

Sizes:
Fig trees for pot culture Fig trees for pot culture
Fig trees for pot culture

Available in summer 2017.

Natalina

Ficanzzana

Biffara

Laturella

Available in summer 2017.

Natalina

Ficanzzana

Biffara

Laturella

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Goji Berry  (Lycium barbarum) Goji Berry  (Lycium barbarum)
Goji Berry (Lycium barbarum)

(Lycium barbarum) Also known as Matrimony Vine, this attractive Chinese native is a sometimes spiney, viney shrub that grows 8-10' in height. Light purple, bell-shaped flowers bloom in May and continue throughout the summer. Flowers are followed by orange-red berries. In China these sweet and nutritious berries are eaten fresh and dried like raisins. The berries are among the highest in anti-oxidants, have more carotene than carrots, and contain all the essential amino acids and many minerals . Chinese Wolfberry is self-fertile and drought resistant, and likes full to half-day sun and well-drained soil. It does especially well in seaside locations.

(Lycium barbarum) Also known as Matrimony Vine, this attractive Chinese native is a sometimes spiney, viney shrub that grows 8-10' in height. Light purple, bell-shaped flowers bloom in May and continue throughout the summer. Flowers are followed by orange-red berries. In China these sweet and nutritious berries are eaten fresh and dried like raisins. The berries are among the highest in anti-oxidants, have more carotene than carrots, and contain all the essential amino acids and many minerals . Chinese Wolfberry is self-fertile and drought resistant, and likes full to half-day sun and well-drained soil. It does especially well in seaside locations.

Gooseberry 'Black Velvet' (Ribes grossularia) Gooseberry 'Black Velvet' (Ribes grossularia)
Gooseberry 'Black Velvet' (Ribes grossularia)

The deep purple fruits are the size of seedless grapes. They are very vigorous in growth. Flavor is very good to excellent when they ripen on the bush. Black Velvet has won awards for its superb qualities and disease and mildew resistance. Space 5' circle. Zones 4, possible in zone 3b also.

The deep purple fruits are the size of seedless grapes. They are very vigorous in growth. Flavor is very good to excellent when they ripen on the bush. Black Velvet has won awards for its superb qualities and disease and mildew resistance. Space 5' circle. Zones 4, possible in zone 3b also.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Gooseberry 'Invicta' (Ribes grossularia) Gooseberry 'Invicta' (Ribes grossularia)
Gooseberry 'Invicta' (Ribes grossularia)

Twice the production of other green gooseberries with a sweet, mild tart taste.This plant bears abundant crops of large berries that are delicious fresh or in pies or preserves. Mildew-resistant and cold-hardy. Ripens in July. Self-pollinating. Prefer a sandy loam. Well drained soil in a partial shade or full sun like all the Ribes.

Twice the production of other green gooseberries with a sweet, mild tart taste.This plant bears abundant crops of large berries that are delicious fresh or in pies or preserves. Mildew-resistant and cold-hardy. Ripens in July. Self-pollinating. Prefer a sandy loam. Well drained soil in a partial shade or full sun like all the Ribes.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Gooseberry 'pixwell' (Ribes grossularia) Gooseberry 'pixwell' (Ribes grossularia)
Gooseberry 'pixwell' (Ribes grossularia)

Enjoy easy harvests from nearly thorn-free plants. Irresistible in jellies and pies. Fruit is ripe when color changes from spring green to blush pink. Carefree plants. Cold hardy. Ripens in July. Self-pollinating.

Note

Best grown in organically rich, fertile, medium moisture, well-drained clay or silt loams in full sun to part shade. Prefers full sun, but some part afternoon shade is appreciated in hot summer climates such as the St. Louis area. Gooseberries generally do not perform well in the hot and humid climates south of USDA Zone 6. Plants are best sited in locations protected from strong winds and frost pockets. Plant bare root bushes in October or November. Apply a good compost mulch to the root zone. Water regularly as needed to keep soils uniformly moist. Avoid overhead watering however. Plants are self-fertile. Renewal prune in late winter to early spring each year. Younger branches produce the most fruit, so older, weakened and/or damaged branches should be removed to open up the bush and promote more abundant fruiting. Easier to prune than some other gooseberries because it is almost thornless.

Flowers give way to oval-rounded gooseberies that ripen in late season (august in Eastern Canada). Lobed, medium green leaves are aromatic when crushed. Gooseberries may be eaten ripe off the shrub or used to make jams, jellies and pies.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. In wet, humid conditions, anthracnose, powdery mildew and fungal leaf spot can be troublesome. Aphids, scale and bud mite are potential insect pests in some areas. Gooseberries are an alternate host for white pine blister rust, a usually fatal disease for white pines. ‘Poorman’ is resistant to white pine blister rust and mildew.

Enjoy easy harvests from nearly thorn-free plants. Irresistible in jellies and pies. Fruit is ripe when color changes from spring green to blush pink. Carefree plants. Cold hardy. Ripens in July. Self-pollinating.

Note

Best grown in organically rich, fertile, medium moisture, well-drained clay or silt loams in full sun to part shade. Prefers full sun, but some part afternoon shade is appreciated in hot summer climates such as the St. Louis area. Gooseberries generally do not perform well in the hot and humid climates south of USDA Zone 6. Plants are best sited in locations protected from strong winds and frost pockets. Plant bare root bushes in October or November. Apply a good compost mulch to the root zone. Water regularly as needed to keep soils uniformly moist. Avoid overhead watering however. Plants are self-fertile. Renewal prune in late winter to early spring each year. Younger branches produce the most fruit, so older, weakened and/or damaged branches should be removed to open up the bush and promote more abundant fruiting. Easier to prune than some other gooseberries because it is almost thornless.

Flowers give way to oval-rounded gooseberies that ripen in late season (august in Eastern Canada). Lobed, medium green leaves are aromatic when crushed. Gooseberries may be eaten ripe off the shrub or used to make jams, jellies and pies.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. In wet, humid conditions, anthracnose, powdery mildew and fungal leaf spot can be troublesome. Aphids, scale and bud mite are potential insect pests in some areas. Gooseberries are an alternate host for white pine blister rust, a usually fatal disease for white pines. ‘Poorman’ is resistant to white pine blister rust and mildew.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Gooseberry 'Poorman' (Ribes grossularia)
Gooseberry 'Poorman' (Ribes grossularia)

Culture

Best grown in organically rich, fertile, medium moisture, well-drained clay or silt loams in full sun to part shade. Prefers full sun, but some part afternoon shade is appreciated in hot summer climates such as the St. Louis area. Gooseberries generally do not perform well in the hot and humid climates south of USDA Zone 6. Plants are best sited in locations protected from strong winds and frost pockets. Plant bare root bushes in October or November. Apply a good compost mulch to the root zone. Water regularly as needed to keep soils uniformly moist. Avoid overhead watering however. Plants are self-fertile. Renewal prune in late winter to early spring each year. Younger branches produce the most fruit, so older, weakened and/or damaged branches should be removed to open up the bush and promote more abundant fruiting. Easier to prune than some other gooseberries because it is almost thornless.

Noteworthy Characteristics

‘Poorman’ is a red gooseberry cultivar. It is a compact, mounding, deciduous shrub that typically grows 3-4’ tall. This is an old American variety (introduced in 1888) that produces medium sized fruit. Clusters of greenish-yellow flowers bloom in spring, but are not particularly ornamental. Flowers give way to oval-rounded gooseberies that ripen in late season (august in Eastern Canada). Lobed, medium green leaves are aromatic when crushed. Gooseberries may be eaten ripe off the shrub or used to make jams, jellies and pies.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. In wet, humid conditions, anthracnose, powdery mildew and fungal leaf spot can be troublesome. Aphids, scale and bud mite are potential insect pests in some areas. Gooseberries are an alternate host for white pine blister rust, a usually fatal disease for white pines. ‘Poorman’ is resistant to white pine blister rust and mildew.

Culture

Best grown in organically rich, fertile, medium moisture, well-drained clay or silt loams in full sun to part shade. Prefers full sun, but some part afternoon shade is appreciated in hot summer climates such as the St. Louis area. Gooseberries generally do not perform well in the hot and humid climates south of USDA Zone 6. Plants are best sited in locations protected from strong winds and frost pockets. Plant bare root bushes in October or November. Apply a good compost mulch to the root zone. Water regularly as needed to keep soils uniformly moist. Avoid overhead watering however. Plants are self-fertile. Renewal prune in late winter to early spring each year. Younger branches produce the most fruit, so older, weakened and/or damaged branches should be removed to open up the bush and promote more abundant fruiting. Easier to prune than some other gooseberries because it is almost thornless.

Noteworthy Characteristics

‘Poorman’ is a red gooseberry cultivar. It is a compact, mounding, deciduous shrub that typically grows 3-4’ tall. This is an old American variety (introduced in 1888) that produces medium sized fruit. Clusters of greenish-yellow flowers bloom in spring, but are not particularly ornamental. Flowers give way to oval-rounded gooseberies that ripen in late season (august in Eastern Canada). Lobed, medium green leaves are aromatic when crushed. Gooseberries may be eaten ripe off the shrub or used to make jams, jellies and pies.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. In wet, humid conditions, anthracnose, powdery mildew and fungal leaf spot can be troublesome. Aphids, scale and bud mite are potential insect pests in some areas. Gooseberries are an alternate host for white pine blister rust, a usually fatal disease for white pines. ‘Poorman’ is resistant to white pine blister rust and mildew.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Haskap 'Aurora' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx) Haskap 'Aurora' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx)
Haskap 'Aurora' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx)

‘Aurora’ was selected to be a companion variety for ‘Borealis’ but will also pollinize ‘Tundra’, and ‘Indigo’ series Haskap.‘ Aurora’ gave excellent set when hand crossed to all those varieties and was observed to bloom in sync wit h them. What are companion varieties? It’s when the varieties are desirable and will pollinize each other for good fruit set

Also known as Blue Honeysuckle or Lonicera caerulea L., the haskap plant produces a delicious fruit that can be hard to describe. Many people describe it as a mix between raspberry and blueberry, but in our opinion it is completely unique.The haskap berry is quickly becoming recognized as the latest super food. Its antioxidant and other health benefits are well known in places like Japan, where the berry is considered a delicacy, and scientific study is confirming the benefits of haskap. A 2008 article in the Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, for example, highlights the role haskaps can play in preventing chronic conditions like cancer and diabetes.

Because they produce fruit early in the growing season and because of their exceptional winter hardiness, Haskaps make an excellent choice for orchard owners and small scale growers alike. Haskaps can survive winter temperatures as low as -45°C and their flowers can be exposed to -7°C temperatures with no damage to the fruit.

Commercial and home growers can extend the growing season by pairing haskaps with dwarf sour cherries, saskatoon berries and other fruit crops harvested late in summer. Haskaps are well suited to mechanical harvesting and generally produce fruit by mid-June. Commercial growers can capture more fresh market customers as a result, and home growers can enjoy a longer season of delicious fruit, pies and jams.

‘Aurora’ was selected to be a companion variety for ‘Borealis’ but will also pollinize ‘Tundra’, and ‘Indigo’ series Haskap.‘ Aurora’ gave excellent set when hand crossed to all those varieties and was observed to bloom in sync wit h them. What are companion varieties? It’s when the varieties are desirable and will pollinize each other for good fruit set

Also known as Blue Honeysuckle or Lonicera caerulea L., the haskap plant produces a delicious fruit that can be hard to describe. Many people describe it as a mix between raspberry and blueberry, but in our opinion it is completely unique.The haskap berry is quickly becoming recognized as the latest super food. Its antioxidant and other health benefits are well known in places like Japan, where the berry is considered a delicacy, and scientific study is confirming the benefits of haskap. A 2008 article in the Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, for example, highlights the role haskaps can play in preventing chronic conditions like cancer and diabetes.

Because they produce fruit early in the growing season and because of their exceptional winter hardiness, Haskaps make an excellent choice for orchard owners and small scale growers alike. Haskaps can survive winter temperatures as low as -45°C and their flowers can be exposed to -7°C temperatures with no damage to the fruit.

Commercial and home growers can extend the growing season by pairing haskaps with dwarf sour cherries, saskatoon berries and other fruit crops harvested late in summer. Haskaps are well suited to mechanical harvesting and generally produce fruit by mid-June. Commercial growers can capture more fresh market customers as a result, and home growers can enjoy a longer season of delicious fruit, pies and jams.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Haskap 'Borealis'  (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx) Haskap 'Borealis'  (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx)
Haskap 'Borealis' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx)

Borealis Blue haskap is noted for having very large fruit with excellent flavor. ‘Borealis’ had been our favourite for the home gardener since 2007. The skin may be slightly softer than Tundra. It is probably most suitable for U-pick operations or the home gardener. Use 'Berry Blue' or 'Aurora' as a pollinator for this variety. Borealis Blue haskap plants will bear fruit in 1 to 2 years. The attractive upright shrub reaches 4' x 4' at maturity, produces white blooms in the spring, followed by uniquely shaped fruit ripening early (mid-summer). Requires full to part sun. Hardiness zones 2-7.

Borealis Blue haskap is noted for having very large fruit with excellent flavor. ‘Borealis’ had been our favourite for the home gardener since 2007. The skin may be slightly softer than Tundra. It is probably most suitable for U-pick operations or the home gardener. Use 'Berry Blue' or 'Aurora' as a pollinator for this variety. Borealis Blue haskap plants will bear fruit in 1 to 2 years. The attractive upright shrub reaches 4' x 4' at maturity, produces white blooms in the spring, followed by uniquely shaped fruit ripening early (mid-summer). Requires full to part sun. Hardiness zones 2-7.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Haskap 'Honeybee' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx) Haskap 'Honeybee' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx)
Haskap 'Honeybee' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx)

Honey Bee Haskap is a hardy deciduous shrub. Honey Bee Haskap produces tarter fruit than the Borealis and Tundra varieties, and it holds its fruit longer. This Haskap's leaves are sunburn and powdery mildew resistant. Honey Bee Haskap makes a great pollinator for Borealis, Tundra or the Indigo varieties.

Honey Bee Haskap is a hardy deciduous shrub. Honey Bee Haskap produces tarter fruit than the Borealis and Tundra varieties, and it holds its fruit longer. This Haskap's leaves are sunburn and powdery mildew resistant. Honey Bee Haskap makes a great pollinator for Borealis, Tundra or the Indigo varieties.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Haskap 'tundra' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx) Haskap 'tundra' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx)
Haskap 'tundra' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx)

Tundra haskap berry plants produce a firm-skinned berry that is easily handled for storage. This is the most suitable variety for commercial production. The firm fruit does not bleed from the stem end when removed from the plant, making the variety suitable for mechanized harvest and freezing. Use Berry Blue as a pollinator for this variety. It will bear fruit in 1-2 years. The attractive upright shrub reaches 4 to 5' x 4 to 5' at maturity, produces white blooms in the spring, followed by uniquely shaped fruit ripening early (mid-summer). Requires full to part sun. Hardiness zones 2-8.

Tundra haskap berry plants produce a firm-skinned berry that is easily handled for storage. This is the most suitable variety for commercial production. The firm fruit does not bleed from the stem end when removed from the plant, making the variety suitable for mechanized harvest and freezing. Use Berry Blue as a pollinator for this variety. It will bear fruit in 1-2 years. The attractive upright shrub reaches 4 to 5' x 4 to 5' at maturity, produces white blooms in the spring, followed by uniquely shaped fruit ripening early (mid-summer). Requires full to part sun. Hardiness zones 2-8.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Haskap male 'berry blue' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx)
Haskap male 'berry blue' (Lonicera caerulea var. emphyllocalyx)

Berry Blue is the perfect polinator. Haskap Berry. A male is required to pollinate the female varieties such as Borealis, to produce fruit. One male plant will pollinate up to five females.

Berry Blue is the perfect polinator. Haskap Berry. A male is required to pollinate the female varieties such as Borealis, to produce fruit. One male plant will pollinate up to five females.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Kiwi Actinidia kolomikta ''Artic beauty'' male
Kiwi Actinidia kolomikta ''Artic beauty'' male

This male will pollinate any A. Kolomikta female

Info about hardy kiwifruit:

Native to the forests of eastern Asia, about 80 species of Actinidia are known. Two of these, A. kolomikta and A. arguta can be grown in Canada and similar regions, and produce delicious, grape-sized berries with a flavor similar to grocery store kiwifruit though somewhat sweeter. A third, A. polygama can be grown in this region but its flavor is quite bland in comparison. Kiwifruit vines have beautiful foliage along with tasty fruit. The vigorous growth habit makes it suitable for a variety of cover-type uses such as trellises, arbors, patio overheads, fences, or walls.

Most kiwifruit plants are either male or female: only the females produce berries, while the males supply the pollen. The smooth-skinned berries of the cold-hardy species are typically an emerald green, though you might find varieties with reddish skin and flesh. The berry shape can vary from round to elongate.

The most winter-hardy kiwifruit, A. kolomikta, produces fruit about the size of large grapes. In milder climates, this vigorous species produces cherry-sized fruit. The skin is hairless, so the fruit can be eaten whole, without peeling.

A. kolomikta, sometimes called "Arctic Beauty Kiwi," can be hardy below -40°C or  -40°F, although some plants may not bear fruit the season following a winter that cold. The twining vine will grow at least ten feet long and spread about three feet wide. A. kolomikta foliage is attractive, with variegated pink, white and green leaves, and is sometimes planted for its ornamental value alone. The male plants are commonly more variegated than female plants, and variegation increases as the plants mature.

A. kolomikta performs best in partially shaded sites with well-drained soil and some protection from strong winds. They are neither drought tolerant nor flood tolerant: if the soil becomes too dry, the vine may survive, but the fruit will drop; and if the soil is too wet, the vine is likely to succumb to root rot. Actinidia vines grow well in soil that is acidic to slightly alkaline (pH 5.5-7.5).

A. kolomikta is less vigorous than A. arguta, so little pruning should be necessary. Train the vine to a single trunk for best flowering and fruiting, but don't head back or thin out shoots from this trunk, since fruit will be borne along the length of the stems. Cut stems will "bleed" or run with sap if pruning is done in spring, so any pruning should be done in January and February, with only light pruning in July, if necessary.

This male will pollinate any A. Kolomikta female

Info about hardy kiwifruit:

Native to the forests of eastern Asia, about 80 species of Actinidia are known. Two of these, A. kolomikta and A. arguta can be grown in Canada and similar regions, and produce delicious, grape-sized berries with a flavor similar to grocery store kiwifruit though somewhat sweeter. A third, A. polygama can be grown in this region but its flavor is quite bland in comparison. Kiwifruit vines have beautiful foliage along with tasty fruit. The vigorous growth habit makes it suitable for a variety of cover-type uses such as trellises, arbors, patio overheads, fences, or walls.

Most kiwifruit plants are either male or female: only the females produce berries, while the males supply the pollen. The smooth-skinned berries of the cold-hardy species are typically an emerald green, though you might find varieties with reddish skin and flesh. The berry shape can vary from round to elongate.

The most winter-hardy kiwifruit, A. kolomikta, produces fruit about the size of large grapes. In milder climates, this vigorous species produces cherry-sized fruit. The skin is hairless, so the fruit can be eaten whole, without peeling.

A. kolomikta, sometimes called "Arctic Beauty Kiwi," can be hardy below -40°C or  -40°F, although some plants may not bear fruit the season following a winter that cold. The twining vine will grow at least ten feet long and spread about three feet wide. A. kolomikta foliage is attractive, with variegated pink, white and green leaves, and is sometimes planted for its ornamental value alone. The male plants are commonly more variegated than female plants, and variegation increases as the plants mature.

A. kolomikta performs best in partially shaded sites with well-drained soil and some protection from strong winds. They are neither drought tolerant nor flood tolerant: if the soil becomes too dry, the vine may survive, but the fruit will drop; and if the soil is too wet, the vine is likely to succumb to root rot. Actinidia vines grow well in soil that is acidic to slightly alkaline (pH 5.5-7.5).

A. kolomikta is less vigorous than A. arguta, so little pruning should be necessary. Train the vine to a single trunk for best flowering and fruiting, but don't head back or thin out shoots from this trunk, since fruit will be borne along the length of the stems. Cut stems will "bleed" or run with sap if pruning is done in spring, so any pruning should be done in January and February, with only light pruning in July, if necessary.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Kiwi Actinidia kolomikta female Kiwi Actinidia kolomikta female
Kiwi Actinidia kolomikta female

Must be planted with a male plant.

Actinidia kolomikta is a species of flowering plant in the family Actinidiaceae, native to temperate mixed forests of the Russian Far East, Korea, Japan and China (Eastern Asiatic Region). The plant is a very long-lived, deciduous woody scrambling vine and creeper, which ultimately grows to 8–10 m (26–33 ft). It is the hardiest species in the genus Actinidia, at least down to about −40 °C (−40 °F) in winter, albeit somewhat susceptible to late spring frosts.

Actinidia kolomikta is cultivated in cold temperate regions as an ornamental plant, largely for the striking random variegation in pink and white of some its leaves but also because of the relatively small (2-5 g or 0.07- 0.18 ounces) kiwifruit-like delicious berries it produces. There are a number of named cultivars bred for the latter purpose in Russia and Poland, though it takes years for a plant to start yielding, and because A. kolomikta is dioecious a male pollenizer plant is required for the wild vines and most of the cultivars.

Must be planted with a male plant.

Actinidia kolomikta is a species of flowering plant in the family Actinidiaceae, native to temperate mixed forests of the Russian Far East, Korea, Japan and China (Eastern Asiatic Region). The plant is a very long-lived, deciduous woody scrambling vine and creeper, which ultimately grows to 8–10 m (26–33 ft). It is the hardiest species in the genus Actinidia, at least down to about −40 °C (−40 °F) in winter, albeit somewhat susceptible to late spring frosts.

Actinidia kolomikta is cultivated in cold temperate regions as an ornamental plant, largely for the striking random variegation in pink and white of some its leaves but also because of the relatively small (2-5 g or 0.07- 0.18 ounces) kiwifruit-like delicious berries it produces. There are a number of named cultivars bred for the latter purpose in Russia and Poland, though it takes years for a plant to start yielding, and because A. kolomikta is dioecious a male pollenizer plant is required for the wild vines and most of the cultivars.

Sizes:
Male 'Lord'  sea buckthorn (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides) Male 'Lord'  sea buckthorn (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides)
Male 'Lord' sea buckthorn (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides)

A great pollinator for Sunny™. Lord Sea Berry variety is also a fine ornamental. Seaberry requires at least one male and one female to produce fruit. Lord has a 10 day period in the spring where it produces it's pollen and is a great choice for Sunny­™ One Male plant can pollinate 3-7 female plants. For orchard planning, plant 1 male per 7 female plants.

A great pollinator for Sunny™. Lord Sea Berry variety is also a fine ornamental. Seaberry requires at least one male and one female to produce fruit. Lord has a 10 day period in the spring where it produces it's pollen and is a great choice for Sunny­™ One Male plant can pollinate 3-7 female plants. For orchard planning, plant 1 male per 7 female plants.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
male Kiwi Meader (a. Arguta)
male Kiwi Meader (a. Arguta)

This Hardy Kiwi is a male variety and should be planted with every 5 female plants to produce fruit. A large producer and vigorously growing vine. When planting provide support for this perennial. The foliage is disease and insect resistant. Hardy to zones 3-9.

This Hardy Kiwi is a male variety and should be planted with every 5 female plants to produce fruit. A large producer and vigorously growing vine. When planting provide support for this perennial. The foliage is disease and insect resistant. Hardy to zones 3-9.

Sizes:
male Kiwi Pasha (A.Kolomikta)
male Kiwi Pasha (A.Kolomikta)

A good pollinator for our female Arctic Beauty varieties, Pasha™ also a fine ornamental vine and features strikingly colorful foliage. One Pasha™ Male plant can pollinate up to 8 female plants. Male Kiwi plants do not bear fruit.

A good pollinator for our female Arctic Beauty varieties, Pasha™ also a fine ornamental vine and features strikingly colorful foliage. One Pasha™ Male plant can pollinate up to 8 female plants. Male Kiwi plants do not bear fruit.

Nectarine 'Hardired'  (prunus persica nucipersica) Nectarine 'Hardired'  (prunus persica nucipersica)
Nectarine 'Hardired' (prunus persica nucipersica)

Productive, reliable and carefree. This variety is disease-resistant (especially to bacterial spot and brown rot) making it easy to grow, and it is very productive — thin the bountiful fruit crop for bigger nectarines. Fruits feature firm, yellow, flavorful flesh. Semi-freestone. Originates from Ontario, Canada, introduced in 1974. Ripens in August. Self-pollinating.

Productive, reliable and carefree. This variety is disease-resistant (especially to bacterial spot and brown rot) making it easy to grow, and it is very productive — thin the bountiful fruit crop for bigger nectarines. Fruits feature firm, yellow, flavorful flesh. Semi-freestone. Originates from Ontario, Canada, introduced in 1974. Ripens in August. Self-pollinating.

Sizes:
Orange Energy, sea buckthorn (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides) Orange Energy, sea buckthorn (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides)
Orange Energy, sea buckthorn (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides)

NEW

Sturdy growth, broad and upright with wide spreading side branches, moderately thorny. Fruits large, oblong to oval, lightly hairy, bright yellowish-orange, colours solid, dense fruiting already from mid to end September. A top cultivar from the hybridization programme of H.-J. ALBRECHT, Berlin – considered as the crème de la crème from this series. Suitable pollinators: Pollmix 1, 3, 4, 5. D, H, St. Zone 4. Community trademark 013182951. European Plant Breeders´ rights EU 20825. US-Trademark 3637515, Canada TMA 756646 - unauthorised propagation prohibited!

NEW

Sturdy growth, broad and upright with wide spreading side branches, moderately thorny. Fruits large, oblong to oval, lightly hairy, bright yellowish-orange, colours solid, dense fruiting already from mid to end September. A top cultivar from the hybridization programme of H.-J. ALBRECHT, Berlin – considered as the crème de la crème from this series. Suitable pollinators: Pollmix 1, 3, 4, 5. D, H, St. Zone 4. Community trademark 013182951. European Plant Breeders´ rights EU 20825. US-Trademark 3637515, Canada TMA 756646 - unauthorised propagation prohibited!

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
peach tree 'Reliance' (prunus persica) peach tree 'Reliance' (prunus persica)
peach tree 'Reliance' (prunus persica)

Out of stock. Available in 2018.

Ideal for container growing for colder climate

Our hardiest peach tree. This tree produces a heavy crop of fruit as far north as Canada, even after frigid winters. Perfect for northern fruit gardens! Fruit is medium-to-large with a sweet, peachy flavor. Features a flush of pink flowers in early spring. Originates from New Hampshire in 1964. Cold-hardy. Freestone. Ripens in early August. Self-pollinating. Hardy to zone 5a-5b. Protect from harsh cold winter winds. Susceptible of die back after cold winters.

Out of stock. Available in 2018.

Ideal for container growing for colder climate

Our hardiest peach tree. This tree produces a heavy crop of fruit as far north as Canada, even after frigid winters. Perfect for northern fruit gardens! Fruit is medium-to-large with a sweet, peachy flavor. Features a flush of pink flowers in early spring. Originates from New Hampshire in 1964. Cold-hardy. Freestone. Ripens in early August. Self-pollinating. Hardy to zone 5a-5b. Protect from harsh cold winter winds. Susceptible of die back after cold winters.

Pear ''North brite'' (Pyrus Spp) Pear ''North brite'' (Pyrus Spp)
Pear ''North brite'' (Pyrus Spp)

NORTHBRITE is our food market customers favourite pear! It has eye appeal (red skin) and outstanding flavour. The sugary sweet flesh stays firm for months and picking can be done over many weeks...quite different from most European pears like Bartlett that has to be picked at exactly the right day or will go "mushy" on tree. Northbrite has great commercial potential because of its high quality and long storage capabilities. Northbrite trees are very hardy (Zone 3) and stay smaller because of precocious bearing and high productivity( large crops). Partially self-fertile but only shows full crops with a pear pollinator close by. We harvest weekly from early Sept to early Oct...as fruit gets sweeter on tree without losing its quality....great for farm markets and CSA's.

NORTHBRITE is our food market customers favourite pear! It has eye appeal (red skin) and outstanding flavour. The sugary sweet flesh stays firm for months and picking can be done over many weeks...quite different from most European pears like Bartlett that has to be picked at exactly the right day or will go "mushy" on tree. Northbrite has great commercial potential because of its high quality and long storage capabilities. Northbrite trees are very hardy (Zone 3) and stay smaller because of precocious bearing and high productivity( large crops). Partially self-fertile but only shows full crops with a pear pollinator close by. We harvest weekly from early Sept to early Oct...as fruit gets sweeter on tree without losing its quality....great for farm markets and CSA's.

Pear 'Bartlett' (Pyrus Bartlett) Pear 'Bartlett' (Pyrus Bartlett)
Pear 'Bartlett' (Pyrus Bartlett)

Quantity limited

The Bartlett Pear tree is a deciduous, fruit-bearing tree with ornamental features.  Plant several in your back yard for a private orchard, or just one in front where the neighbors can share in the excitement of the coming harvest.
 The Bartlett is an excellent choice whether you’re an experienced gardener or trying something new. It’s fast-growing so you won’t have long to wait for a harvest.  It also tends to be long-lived so you’re unlikely to face the disappointment of losing a tree you’ve cared for and enjoyed. If you live in an urban environment, that’s ok too as the Bartlett adapts well to urban pollution.  Bartlett’s don’t need to have other trees for cross pollination.  You can have just one and still get high quality pears.
 
The Bartlett is a delightful fruit tree.  It grows 10-15 feet in height with an upright branching oval form that will create a charming silhouette for your landscape. You won’t believe your eyes when you see the flowers that emerge on your Bartlett in the spring.  The clusters of tiny white blossoms will absolutely envelope your tree with their scented elegance. If you stand close you’ll likely hear your Bartlett hum with the enchanting song of the bees that come to harvest pollen and pollinate. The low canopy of the Bartlett will seem to invite you to pause a moment and reach for a green-golden pear.  It’s so easy to harvest.  The rounded bell-shaped, golden-green fruit will dangle well within your reach, tempting you to taste its juicy sweet flavor. 
 
The Bartlett pear is a beautiful tree with exceptional fruit.  The fruit keeps well in storage, and is prized for use in preserves, tarts and other dishes.  Of course, it also tastes great right off the tree!  The Bartlett is an outstanding choice for a lovely tree that also provides an ample harvest. Hardy to zone 5a-5b

Quantity limited

The Bartlett Pear tree is a deciduous, fruit-bearing tree with ornamental features.  Plant several in your back yard for a private orchard, or just one in front where the neighbors can share in the excitement of the coming harvest.
 The Bartlett is an excellent choice whether you’re an experienced gardener or trying something new. It’s fast-growing so you won’t have long to wait for a harvest.  It also tends to be long-lived so you’re unlikely to face the disappointment of losing a tree you’ve cared for and enjoyed. If you live in an urban environment, that’s ok too as the Bartlett adapts well to urban pollution.  Bartlett’s don’t need to have other trees for cross pollination.  You can have just one and still get high quality pears.
 
The Bartlett is a delightful fruit tree.  It grows 10-15 feet in height with an upright branching oval form that will create a charming silhouette for your landscape. You won’t believe your eyes when you see the flowers that emerge on your Bartlett in the spring.  The clusters of tiny white blossoms will absolutely envelope your tree with their scented elegance. If you stand close you’ll likely hear your Bartlett hum with the enchanting song of the bees that come to harvest pollen and pollinate. The low canopy of the Bartlett will seem to invite you to pause a moment and reach for a green-golden pear.  It’s so easy to harvest.  The rounded bell-shaped, golden-green fruit will dangle well within your reach, tempting you to taste its juicy sweet flavor. 
 
The Bartlett pear is a beautiful tree with exceptional fruit.  The fruit keeps well in storage, and is prized for use in preserves, tarts and other dishes.  Of course, it also tastes great right off the tree!  The Bartlett is an outstanding choice for a lovely tree that also provides an ample harvest. Hardy to zone 5a-5b

Sizes:
pear 'Luscious', (pyrus Spp) pear 'Luscious', (pyrus Spp)
pear 'Luscious', (pyrus Spp)

The Luscious Pear (Pyrus 'Luscious') produces a medium to small bright yellow pear with a beautiful red blush. The fruit is very juicy, and deliciously sweet. A very vigorous grower, the Luscious Pear will mature at a height of 7-8 m 20-25 feet. It is considered a mid-sized tree that will really reward you when planted in full sun. It also prefers well drained soil. Your Luscious Pear is fireblight resistant and extremely hardy, as low as - 35° degrees.

In spring the Luscious Pear is a show stopper. It will announce the season with large clusters of gorgeous, snow white flowers. In early fall your pear tree will be heavy with ripe juicy pears ready to be enjoyed right off the tree.

That’s not all though, the Luscious Pear is also a high quality dessert pear with endless possibilities.Imagine serving your guests mouthwatering, caramelized pears with pork roast. They will be so impressed and only you will know how easy it was to make. Or delight your family when the smell of a pear crisp baking fills the house. Warm pear crisp will be a perfect finish to a brisk autumn day.

If you like the Bartlett Pear, you’ll love the Luscious Pear. It is similar to the Bartlett pear but with a more intense flavor. The Lucious Pear does best with a second tree for cross pollination. As beautiful as they are, you’ll want to plant two to create a stunning focal point.

* Intense Flavor
* Cold Tolerant and Disease Resistant
* Disease Resistant

Recommended pollinators: Bartlett, Patten, Ure, Clapps, So sweet.

The Luscious Pear (Pyrus 'Luscious') produces a medium to small bright yellow pear with a beautiful red blush. The fruit is very juicy, and deliciously sweet. A very vigorous grower, the Luscious Pear will mature at a height of 7-8 m 20-25 feet. It is considered a mid-sized tree that will really reward you when planted in full sun. It also prefers well drained soil. Your Luscious Pear is fireblight resistant and extremely hardy, as low as - 35° degrees.

In spring the Luscious Pear is a show stopper. It will announce the season with large clusters of gorgeous, snow white flowers. In early fall your pear tree will be heavy with ripe juicy pears ready to be enjoyed right off the tree.

That’s not all though, the Luscious Pear is also a high quality dessert pear with endless possibilities.Imagine serving your guests mouthwatering, caramelized pears with pork roast. They will be so impressed and only you will know how easy it was to make. Or delight your family when the smell of a pear crisp baking fills the house. Warm pear crisp will be a perfect finish to a brisk autumn day.

If you like the Bartlett Pear, you’ll love the Luscious Pear. It is similar to the Bartlett pear but with a more intense flavor. The Lucious Pear does best with a second tree for cross pollination. As beautiful as they are, you’ll want to plant two to create a stunning focal point.

* Intense Flavor
* Cold Tolerant and Disease Resistant
* Disease Resistant

Recommended pollinators: Bartlett, Patten, Ure, Clapps, So sweet.

pear 'So sweet' (Pyrus Spp)
pear 'So sweet' (Pyrus Spp)

Suitable for zone 3b. The tree produce a tasty and sweet medium size pear. One of the best for colder zone. The tree is resistant to a lot of diseases. This varietie is originally from St-Lawrence vally in Quebec.

The fruits must be harvested still hard and placed inside house for a slow rippening. Sometime it takes 12 days but you will not regret it.

How to Ripen Pears: In a Brown Paper Bag

If the pears you brought home from  your own trees are still a little hard and not quite ripe, then you might want to try ripening them in a bag at room temperature. Cold temperatures slow down the ripening process, so storing ripe pears in the refrigerator is the best way to maintain quality. Like bananas and avocados, pears naturally release ethylene gas (a ripening hormone) as they ripen. Placing the pears in a brown paper bag keeps ethylene close to the fruit and speeds up ripening. Any bag would work, but paper is preferred over plastic as it allows the fruit to breathe.

Suitable for zone 3b. The tree produce a tasty and sweet medium size pear. One of the best for colder zone. The tree is resistant to a lot of diseases. This varietie is originally from St-Lawrence vally in Quebec.

The fruits must be harvested still hard and placed inside house for a slow rippening. Sometime it takes 12 days but you will not regret it.

How to Ripen Pears: In a Brown Paper Bag

If the pears you brought home from  your own trees are still a little hard and not quite ripe, then you might want to try ripening them in a bag at room temperature. Cold temperatures slow down the ripening process, so storing ripe pears in the refrigerator is the best way to maintain quality. Like bananas and avocados, pears naturally release ethylene gas (a ripening hormone) as they ripen. Placing the pears in a brown paper bag keeps ethylene close to the fruit and speeds up ripening. Any bag would work, but paper is preferred over plastic as it allows the fruit to breathe.

Pear Larinskaya

descrption to coming soon

descrption to coming soon

Sizes:
Pear Phileson

description soon

description soon

Sizes:
Pear Ronde Verte
Sizes:
pear tree 'Clapps'  (Pyrus Clapps favourite) pear tree 'Clapps'  (Pyrus Clapps favourite)
pear tree 'Clapps' (Pyrus Clapps favourite)

Limited quantity

Description/Taste: The Clapp's Favorite tree grows vigorously, with an upright growth habit. The large, pyriform fruits themselves are a beautiful yellow with red or scarlet cheeks. The flesh is sweet with a little acidity, with a juicy and fine-grained texture. The flavor is mild.
Seasons/Availability: Clapp's Favorite Pear is available in late summer and early fall.
Current Facts: Clapp's Favorite Pear is an old American variety of Pyrus communis, originally from Massachusetts. A red variety is called Red Clapp's Favorite, or Starkrimson. It has been described as similar to the Bartlett Pear, and may be mis-labelled by some retailers.
Nutritional Value: Pears have around 100 calories and contain many important nutrients. Vitamin C, dietary fiber, iron, calcium, and potassium are also present in pears. These fruits also have pectin, a particular type of fiber that may help guard against colon cancer.
Applications: This pear is fairly versatile. It is good for fresh eating, canning, and cooking/baking. They do not store well, however, so they should be eaten or processed quickly. Choose pears that are firm rather than very soft, and that are free from bruising. To use them immediately, store them at room temperature. To keep them for a few days longer, store in the refrigerator. They are ready to eat when the stem end gives slightly to pressure. Clapp's Favorite Pears go well with almonds, cheese, and spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger.
Ethnic/Cultural Info: Modern consumers like their pears to be softer, the better for fresh eating. However, historically, pears tended to be harder, and had to be bred to fit changing preferences. Europeans in the 17th and 18th centuries bred softer pears, which then travelled to the New World. Today, there are generally more varieties of pears that have grown in Europe than in the United States.
Geography/History: The first Clapp's Favorite Pear tree was discovered in the 1850s in Dorchester, Massachusetts (now a neighborhood of Boston). It grew on Thaddeus Clapp's property, leading to its present-day name. He introduced this pear to market in 1860. Today it grows well in the northern UK, southern Canada and the northeastern United States

Limited quantity

Description/Taste: The Clapp's Favorite tree grows vigorously, with an upright growth habit. The large, pyriform fruits themselves are a beautiful yellow with red or scarlet cheeks. The flesh is sweet with a little acidity, with a juicy and fine-grained texture. The flavor is mild.
Seasons/Availability: Clapp's Favorite Pear is available in late summer and early fall.
Current Facts: Clapp's Favorite Pear is an old American variety of Pyrus communis, originally from Massachusetts. A red variety is called Red Clapp's Favorite, or Starkrimson. It has been described as similar to the Bartlett Pear, and may be mis-labelled by some retailers.
Nutritional Value: Pears have around 100 calories and contain many important nutrients. Vitamin C, dietary fiber, iron, calcium, and potassium are also present in pears. These fruits also have pectin, a particular type of fiber that may help guard against colon cancer.
Applications: This pear is fairly versatile. It is good for fresh eating, canning, and cooking/baking. They do not store well, however, so they should be eaten or processed quickly. Choose pears that are firm rather than very soft, and that are free from bruising. To use them immediately, store them at room temperature. To keep them for a few days longer, store in the refrigerator. They are ready to eat when the stem end gives slightly to pressure. Clapp's Favorite Pears go well with almonds, cheese, and spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger.
Ethnic/Cultural Info: Modern consumers like their pears to be softer, the better for fresh eating. However, historically, pears tended to be harder, and had to be bred to fit changing preferences. Europeans in the 17th and 18th centuries bred softer pears, which then travelled to the New World. Today, there are generally more varieties of pears that have grown in Europe than in the United States.
Geography/History: The first Clapp's Favorite Pear tree was discovered in the 1850s in Dorchester, Massachusetts (now a neighborhood of Boston). It grew on Thaddeus Clapp's property, leading to its present-day name. He introduced this pear to market in 1860. Today it grows well in the northern UK, southern Canada and the northeastern United States

Sizes:
pear tree 'Golden spice' (pyrus golden spice) pear tree 'Golden spice' (pyrus golden spice)
pear tree 'Golden spice' (pyrus golden spice)

Excellent for canning and other preserve recipe..not for fresh consumption

Very Good pollinator

Golden Spice is a very hardy pear hardy to zone 2b or 3a, with 1.75" fruit that are medium yellow and lightly blushed with dull red. This small, firm fruit is best for canning and spicing but not for fresh eating. Ripens in late August and can be messy if fruit is allowed to fall to the ground. Very resistant to fireblight. Needs pollinator like pyrus usuriensis or pyrus John. Hardy to -40° celcius.

Excellent for canning and other preserve recipe..not for fresh consumption

Very Good pollinator

Golden Spice is a very hardy pear hardy to zone 2b or 3a, with 1.75" fruit that are medium yellow and lightly blushed with dull red. This small, firm fruit is best for canning and spicing but not for fresh eating. Ripens in late August and can be messy if fruit is allowed to fall to the ground. Very resistant to fireblight. Needs pollinator like pyrus usuriensis or pyrus John. Hardy to -40° celcius.

Sizes:
Pear tree 'Lorraine' (Pyrus Spp)
Pear tree 'Lorraine' (Pyrus Spp)

Once ripe, it has a yellowish, juicy, fragrant and sweet flesh that melts in your mouth. Harvest early September. The fruit ripen all at the same time then fall. Pick before ripe, like so many other pears. Resistant to scab, fire blight and most insects. (Hardy to zone 4a-4b)

Once ripe, it has a yellowish, juicy, fragrant and sweet flesh that melts in your mouth. Harvest early September. The fruit ripen all at the same time then fall. Pick before ripe, like so many other pears. Resistant to scab, fire blight and most insects. (Hardy to zone 4a-4b)

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
pear tree 'Patten' (Pyrus Spp)
pear tree 'Patten' (Pyrus Spp)

Fruit is of good size and quality. Very tender and juicy. A good pollinator for most other pear trees. Ideal for zone 3b and over. Like the other varieties,  the fruits must be harvested still hard and placed inside house for a slow rippening. Sometime it takes 12 days but you will not regret it.

How to Ripen Pears: In a Brown Paper Bag

If the pears you brought home from  your own trees are still a little hard and not quite ripe, then you might want to try ripening them in a bag at room temperature. Cold temperatures slow down the ripening process, so storing ripe pears in the refrigerator is the best way to maintain quality. Like bananas and avocados, pears naturally release ethylene gas (a ripening hormone) as they ripen. Placing the pears in a brown paper bag keeps ethylene close to the fruit and speeds up ripening. Any bag would work, but paper is preferred over plastic as it allows the fruit to breathe.

Fruit is of good size and quality. Very tender and juicy. A good pollinator for most other pear trees. Ideal for zone 3b and over. Like the other varieties,  the fruits must be harvested still hard and placed inside house for a slow rippening. Sometime it takes 12 days but you will not regret it.

How to Ripen Pears: In a Brown Paper Bag

If the pears you brought home from  your own trees are still a little hard and not quite ripe, then you might want to try ripening them in a bag at room temperature. Cold temperatures slow down the ripening process, so storing ripe pears in the refrigerator is the best way to maintain quality. Like bananas and avocados, pears naturally release ethylene gas (a ripening hormone) as they ripen. Placing the pears in a brown paper bag keeps ethylene close to the fruit and speeds up ripening. Any bag would work, but paper is preferred over plastic as it allows the fruit to breathe.

Sizes:
Plum 'Black Ice' prunus

description coming soon...

description coming soon...

Sizes:
plum 'Brookred' (prunus spp) plum 'Brookred' (prunus spp)
plum 'Brookred' (prunus spp)

Brookred Plum is a vigorous grower and heavy producer of dark red, high quality fruit. Pollinator required like american nad other varientis except european varieties. The fruits are harvested in late August. Suitable for zone: 3a
Location: Full Sun
Height: 5 m 16'
Width: 4 m 13'
Flowering time: may

Brookred Plum is a vigorous grower and heavy producer of dark red, high quality fruit. Pollinator required like american nad other varientis except european varieties. The fruits are harvested in late August. Suitable for zone: 3a
Location: Full Sun
Height: 5 m 16'
Width: 4 m 13'
Flowering time: may

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Plum 'German' (prunus Spp) Plum 'German' (prunus Spp)
Plum 'German' (prunus Spp)

Very similar to the Mount-Royal blue plum. Hardy to at least zone 3b, susceptible to black knot in certain area.

Very similar to the Mount-Royal blue plum. Hardy to at least zone 3b, susceptible to black knot in certain area.

Sizes:
Plum Damas Blue
Sizes:
Plum Mount-Royal (prunus Spp) Plum Mount-Royal (prunus Spp)
Plum Mount-Royal (prunus Spp)

A beautiful European plum bearing fruits that are large, very sweet and tasty, deep blue, freestone, and well-suited for eating raw, preserves and jam. Excellent for canning and freezing. A heavy annual producer. Fruit ripens mid-to-late August. Does not require cross pollination.

Very susceptible to the black knot

http://extension.psu.edu/pests/plant-diseases/all-fact-sheets/black-knot-of-prunus

A beautiful European plum bearing fruits that are large, very sweet and tasty, deep blue, freestone, and well-suited for eating raw, preserves and jam. Excellent for canning and freezing. A heavy annual producer. Fruit ripens mid-to-late August. Does not require cross pollination.

Very susceptible to the black knot

http://extension.psu.edu/pests/plant-diseases/all-fact-sheets/black-knot-of-prunus

Sizes:
Plum pembina
Sizes:
plum tree 'La Crescent'  (Prunus Spp) plum tree 'La Crescent'  (Prunus Spp)
plum tree 'La Crescent' (Prunus Spp)

The fruit

The 'La Crescent' plum is sweet and juicy, of a golden-orange colour. Its flesh is yellow like an apricot, its melting and not fibrous. 'La Crescent' plum is freestone, meaning that you can easily remove its seed from its flesh. Its taste has a hint of apricot. This is a good plum to eat fresh, as a dessert and to make jam.

The tree

'La Crescent' is a hybrid plum and it must be pollinated by a pure Canadian Plum (Prunus nigra) or a pure American plum (Prunus americana) in order to produce fruit. This plum tree is hardy to zone 4.

'La Crescent' is more a ''curiosity'' plum tree than a comercial one, in the sense that it is not a heavy bearer, and it does not give a good crop every year. It is sensitive to the shot-hole leaf spot disease (Coryneum blight).

Origin

Also known as 'Crescent', 'Golden La Crescent' and 'Golden Minnesota'. La Crescent is a cross between the 'Shiro' plum (Prunus simonii x Prunus salicina x Prunus cerasifera x Prunus munsoniana) and 'Howard Yellow' plum ( Prunus americana). It was introduced in 1923 by the University of Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm.

The fruit

The 'La Crescent' plum is sweet and juicy, of a golden-orange colour. Its flesh is yellow like an apricot, its melting and not fibrous. 'La Crescent' plum is freestone, meaning that you can easily remove its seed from its flesh. Its taste has a hint of apricot. This is a good plum to eat fresh, as a dessert and to make jam.

The tree

'La Crescent' is a hybrid plum and it must be pollinated by a pure Canadian Plum (Prunus nigra) or a pure American plum (Prunus americana) in order to produce fruit. This plum tree is hardy to zone 4.

'La Crescent' is more a ''curiosity'' plum tree than a comercial one, in the sense that it is not a heavy bearer, and it does not give a good crop every year. It is sensitive to the shot-hole leaf spot disease (Coryneum blight).

Origin

Also known as 'Crescent', 'Golden La Crescent' and 'Golden Minnesota'. La Crescent is a cross between the 'Shiro' plum (Prunus simonii x Prunus salicina x Prunus cerasifera x Prunus munsoniana) and 'Howard Yellow' plum ( Prunus americana). It was introduced in 1923 by the University of Minnesota Fruit Breeding Farm.

Sizes:
plum tree 'Underwood' (Prunus Spp) plum tree 'Underwood' (Prunus Spp)
plum tree 'Underwood' (Prunus Spp)

The Fruit

The Underwood plum is a medium to large plum with an oblong or conic form. The skin is a red and moderately thick with a slightly tart flavour. The aromatic flesh is golden yellow; tender, sweet and juicy. It is almost completely freestone but with still a little cling. These plums are ready for harvest for us in mid-August and keep better than other plums but still have relatively limited fresh storage life.

The Tree

Underwood plum tree is large and vigorous with a spreading growth pattern. It provides large annual yields given good pollination and has beautiful yellow fall colour; hardy to zone 3.

Its Origin

Underwood plum originated from the University of Minnesota breeding program where it was originally tested as Minn 91 and was introduced in 1921, making it one of the oldest commercially available cultivars from the program. It is a cross between Shiro (P. angustifolia x P.cerasifera x P. salicina x P. simonii) and Wyant (P. Americana).

The Fruit

The Underwood plum is a medium to large plum with an oblong or conic form. The skin is a red and moderately thick with a slightly tart flavour. The aromatic flesh is golden yellow; tender, sweet and juicy. It is almost completely freestone but with still a little cling. These plums are ready for harvest for us in mid-August and keep better than other plums but still have relatively limited fresh storage life.

The Tree

Underwood plum tree is large and vigorous with a spreading growth pattern. It provides large annual yields given good pollination and has beautiful yellow fall colour; hardy to zone 3.

Its Origin

Underwood plum originated from the University of Minnesota breeding program where it was originally tested as Minn 91 and was introduced in 1921, making it one of the oldest commercially available cultivars from the program. It is a cross between Shiro (P. angustifolia x P.cerasifera x P. salicina x P. simonii) and Wyant (P. Americana).

Sizes:
Plum tree Valton, (prunus spp.)
Plum tree Valton, (prunus spp.)

This vigorous plum tree is very productive. The skin of the fruit is red and the flesh is yellow and very sweet. Fruit is clingstone and very flavourful. Long harvest period starting beginning of September right through mid-September. This selection comes from Father Valton, a pioneer in organic agriculture in Quebec. Hardy to zone 3b... maybe 3a.

This vigorous plum tree is very productive. The skin of the fruit is red and the flesh is yellow and very sweet. Fruit is clingstone and very flavourful. Long harvest period starting beginning of September right through mid-September. This selection comes from Father Valton, a pioneer in organic agriculture in Quebec. Hardy to zone 3b... maybe 3a.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Plum Vaneta
Sizes:
Raspberry 'Prelude' Raspberry 'Prelude'
Raspberry 'Prelude'
Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Red currant 'red lake' (Ribes rubrum ) Red currant 'red lake' (Ribes rubrum )
Red currant 'red lake' (Ribes rubrum )

Culture

Best grown in organically rich, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Prefers cool summer climates. Some part afternoon shade is appreciated in hot summer climates. Best sited in locations protected from strong winter winds and frost pockets. Appreciates a good organic mulch for the root zone. Water regularly as needed to keep soils uniformly moist. Avoid overhead watering however. Plants are self-fertile. Often sold as bare root plants by nurseries. Space 3' apart. Prune as needed during the dormant season. It is generally recommended that stems older than 3 years on red currants be removed. May take 4-5 years for plants to become well-established and reach full fruit-bearing potential.

Characteristics

'Red Lake' is a red currant cultivar which is grown primarily for fruit production. It is a compact, mounding, deciduous shrub which grows 3-5' tall. Clusters of greenish-yellow flowers bloom in spring, and are noticeable but not particularly ornamental. Flowers give way to long, pendant clusters of bright red currants which ripen in July. Medium green leaves are 3-5 lobed, and are aromatic when crushed. Red currants, although tart, may be eaten ripe off the shrub, but are perhaps more often harvested to make jams, jellies and pies.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. In wet, humid conditions, anthracnose, powdery mildew and fungal leaf spot can be troublesome. Currant aphid, scale, currant bud mite and currant fruit fly are potential insect pests in some areas. Although much less so than with black currants (Ribes nigrum), red currants can be an alternate host for white pine blister rust, a usually fatal disease for white pines.

Culture

Best grown in organically rich, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Prefers cool summer climates. Some part afternoon shade is appreciated in hot summer climates. Best sited in locations protected from strong winter winds and frost pockets. Appreciates a good organic mulch for the root zone. Water regularly as needed to keep soils uniformly moist. Avoid overhead watering however. Plants are self-fertile. Often sold as bare root plants by nurseries. Space 3' apart. Prune as needed during the dormant season. It is generally recommended that stems older than 3 years on red currants be removed. May take 4-5 years for plants to become well-established and reach full fruit-bearing potential.

Characteristics

'Red Lake' is a red currant cultivar which is grown primarily for fruit production. It is a compact, mounding, deciduous shrub which grows 3-5' tall. Clusters of greenish-yellow flowers bloom in spring, and are noticeable but not particularly ornamental. Flowers give way to long, pendant clusters of bright red currants which ripen in July. Medium green leaves are 3-5 lobed, and are aromatic when crushed. Red currants, although tart, may be eaten ripe off the shrub, but are perhaps more often harvested to make jams, jellies and pies.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. In wet, humid conditions, anthracnose, powdery mildew and fungal leaf spot can be troublesome. Currant aphid, scale, currant bud mite and currant fruit fly are potential insect pests in some areas. Although much less so than with black currants (Ribes nigrum), red currants can be an alternate host for white pine blister rust, a usually fatal disease for white pines.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Red current 'Resista' (Ribes rubrum )
Red current 'Resista' (Ribes rubrum )

Very easy to grow and highly disease resistant, these bushes are super productive of pleasant sweet-tart fruits that make classic jellies, juices, wine and other cooked desserts. The red fruits hang on the bush for a long time for long season fresh eating and high ornamental value. We like to add them to our cranberry sauce(along with some finely chopped quince). High in vitamin C and other healthy compounds. They grow about 5 feet tall and wide and are self fertile. Hardy zones 4-8.

Very easy to grow and highly disease resistant, these bushes are super productive of pleasant sweet-tart fruits that make classic jellies, juices, wine and other cooked desserts. The red fruits hang on the bush for a long time for long season fresh eating and high ornamental value. We like to add them to our cranberry sauce(along with some finely chopped quince). High in vitamin C and other healthy compounds. They grow about 5 feet tall and wide and are self fertile. Hardy zones 4-8.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
running serviceberry (amelanchier stolonifera) running serviceberry (amelanchier stolonifera)
running serviceberry (amelanchier stolonifera)

Amelanchier stolonifera, commonly called running serviceberry, is a deciduous, early-flowering, stoloniferous shrub which typically suckers and spreads to form thickets. It usually grows to only 1 to 2.5 m or 3-5' tall and features 5-petaled, showy, white flowers in drooping clusters which appear before the leaves emerge in early spring. Finely toothed, oval to almost circular, medium to dark green leaves (1-3" long) lack teeth on lower edges and change to variable shades of yellow, orange and red in autumn. Flowers give way to small, round, green berries which mature to a dark purplish-black in summer. Edible berries resemble blueberries in size and color and are often used in pies. Amelanchiers are also commonly called Juneberries. Rust, leaf spot, fire blight and powdery mildew are occasional disease problems and sawfly, leaf miner, borers, and scale are occasional insect pests. Best in shrub borders, or in woodland, naturalized or native plant gardens. Also effective along stream banks and ponds. The plant's small size lends itself well to growing in rock gardens. Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerant of a somewhat wide range of soils. hardy to zone 3. Not the best amelanchier species for the fruit prodiction; amelanchier Alnifolia is much more interesting.

Amelanchier stolonifera, commonly called running serviceberry, is a deciduous, early-flowering, stoloniferous shrub which typically suckers and spreads to form thickets. It usually grows to only 1 to 2.5 m or 3-5' tall and features 5-petaled, showy, white flowers in drooping clusters which appear before the leaves emerge in early spring. Finely toothed, oval to almost circular, medium to dark green leaves (1-3" long) lack teeth on lower edges and change to variable shades of yellow, orange and red in autumn. Flowers give way to small, round, green berries which mature to a dark purplish-black in summer. Edible berries resemble blueberries in size and color and are often used in pies. Amelanchiers are also commonly called Juneberries. Rust, leaf spot, fire blight and powdery mildew are occasional disease problems and sawfly, leaf miner, borers, and scale are occasional insect pests. Best in shrub borders, or in woodland, naturalized or native plant gardens. Also effective along stream banks and ponds. The plant's small size lends itself well to growing in rock gardens. Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerant of a somewhat wide range of soils. hardy to zone 3. Not the best amelanchier species for the fruit prodiction; amelanchier Alnifolia is much more interesting.

Sasakatoonberry or western serviceberry (amechanchier alnifolia smokey) Sasakatoonberry or western serviceberry (amechanchier alnifolia smokey)
Sasakatoonberry or western serviceberry (amechanchier alnifolia smokey)

Amelanchier alnifolia, the saskatoon, Pacific serviceberry, western serviceberry, alder-leaf shadbush, dwarf shadbush, chuckley pear, or western juneberry, is a shrub with edible berry-like fruit, native to North America from Alaska across most of western Canada and in the western and north-central United States. The name "saskatoon" derives from the Cree inanimate noun misâskwatômina (misâskwatômin NI sg, saskatoonberry, misâskwatômina NI pl saskatoonberries). The city of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, is named after the berry.

It is a deciduous shrub or small tree that can grow to 1–8 m (3–26 ft) (rarely to 10 m or 33 ft) in height. Its growth form spans from suckering and forming colonies to clumped. The leaves are oval to nearly circular, 2–5 cm (0.79–1.97 in) long and 1–4.5 cm (0.4–1.8 in) broad, on a 0.5–2 cm (0.2–0.8 in) leaf stem, margins toothed mostly above the middle.

As with all species in the genus Amelanchier, the flowers are white, with five quite separate petals. In A. alnifolia, they are about 2–3 cm (0.8–1.2 in) across, and appear on short racemes of three to 20 somewhat crowded together, in spring while the new leaves are still expanding. The fruit is a small purple pome 5–15 mm (0.2–0.6 in) in diameter, ripening in early summer in the coastal areas and late summer further inland.

Cultivation and uses

Seedlings are planted with 13–20 feet (4.0–6.1 m) between rows and 1.5–3 feet (0.46–0.91 m) between plants. An individual bush may bear fruit 30 or more years.

Saskatoons are adaptable to most soil types with exception of poorly drained or heavy clay soils lacking organic matter. Shallow soils should be avoided, especially if the water table is high or erratic. Winter hardiness is exceptional, but frost can damage blooms as late as May. Large amounts of sunshine are needed for fruit ripening. With a sweet, nutty taste, the fruits have long been eaten by Canada's aboriginal people, fresh or dried. They are well known as an ingredient in pemmican, a preparation of dried meat to which saskatoon berries are added as flavour and preservative. They are also often used in pies, jam, wines, cider, beers, and sugar-infused berries similar to dried cranberries used for cereals, trail mix, and snack foods.

source: Wikipedia

Amelanchier alnifolia, the saskatoon, Pacific serviceberry, western serviceberry, alder-leaf shadbush, dwarf shadbush, chuckley pear, or western juneberry, is a shrub with edible berry-like fruit, native to North America from Alaska across most of western Canada and in the western and north-central United States. The name "saskatoon" derives from the Cree inanimate noun misâskwatômina (misâskwatômin NI sg, saskatoonberry, misâskwatômina NI pl saskatoonberries). The city of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, is named after the berry.

It is a deciduous shrub or small tree that can grow to 1–8 m (3–26 ft) (rarely to 10 m or 33 ft) in height. Its growth form spans from suckering and forming colonies to clumped. The leaves are oval to nearly circular, 2–5 cm (0.79–1.97 in) long and 1–4.5 cm (0.4–1.8 in) broad, on a 0.5–2 cm (0.2–0.8 in) leaf stem, margins toothed mostly above the middle.

As with all species in the genus Amelanchier, the flowers are white, with five quite separate petals. In A. alnifolia, they are about 2–3 cm (0.8–1.2 in) across, and appear on short racemes of three to 20 somewhat crowded together, in spring while the new leaves are still expanding. The fruit is a small purple pome 5–15 mm (0.2–0.6 in) in diameter, ripening in early summer in the coastal areas and late summer further inland.

Cultivation and uses

Seedlings are planted with 13–20 feet (4.0–6.1 m) between rows and 1.5–3 feet (0.46–0.91 m) between plants. An individual bush may bear fruit 30 or more years.

Saskatoons are adaptable to most soil types with exception of poorly drained or heavy clay soils lacking organic matter. Shallow soils should be avoided, especially if the water table is high or erratic. Winter hardiness is exceptional, but frost can damage blooms as late as May. Large amounts of sunshine are needed for fruit ripening. With a sweet, nutty taste, the fruits have long been eaten by Canada's aboriginal people, fresh or dried. They are well known as an ingredient in pemmican, a preparation of dried meat to which saskatoon berries are added as flavour and preservative. They are also often used in pies, jam, wines, cider, beers, and sugar-infused berries similar to dried cranberries used for cereals, trail mix, and snack foods.

source: Wikipedia

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
sea buckthorn 'Caprice' (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides) sea buckthorn 'Caprice' (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides)
sea buckthorn 'Caprice' (HIPPOPHAE rhamnoides)

A vigorous, winter-hardy variety that ripens early. Produces yellow-orange berries and grey-green foliage. Tolerates dry conditions once established.

A vigorous, winter-hardy variety that ripens early. Produces yellow-orange berries and grey-green foliage. Tolerates dry conditions once established.

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
sea buckthorn (Hippophae) sea buckthorn (Hippophae)
sea buckthorn (Hippophae)

Hippophae, the sea buckthorns, are deciduous shrubs in the family Elaeagnaceae. The name sea buckthorn may be hyphenated to avoid confusion with the buckthorns (Rhamnus, family Rhamnaceae). It is also referred to as sandthorn, sallowthorn, or seaberry. Seven species are recognized, two of them probably of hybrid origin, native over a wide area of Europe and Asia.

Hippophae rhamnoides, the common sea buckthorn, is by far the most widespread of the species in the genus, with the ranges of its eight subspecies extending from the Atlantic coasts of Europe across to northwestern Mongolia and northwestern China. In western Europe, it is largely confined to sea coasts where salt spray off the sea prevents other larger plants from outcompeting it, but in central Asia, it is more widespread in dry semidesert sites where other plants cannot survive the dry conditions. In central Europe and Asia, it also occurs as a subalpine shrub above tree line in mountains, and other sunny areas such as river banks. They are tolerant of salt in the air and soil, but demand full sunlight for good growth and do not tolerate shady conditions near larger trees. They typically grow in dry, sandy areas. Sea buckthorn hardiness zones are approximately 3 through 7. The shrubs reach 0.5–6 metres (1.6–19.7 ft) tall, rarely up to 10 metres (33 ft) in central Asia. The leaf arrangement can be alternate, or opposite.

Common sea buckthorn has branches that are dense and stiff, and very thorny. The leaves are a distinct pale silvery-green, lanceolate, 3–8 centimetres (1.2–3.1 in) long and less than 7 millimetres (0.28 in) broad. It is dioecious, with separate male and female plants. The male produces brownish flowers which produce wind-distributed pollen. The female plants produce orange berries 6–9 millimetres (0.24–0.35 in) in diameter, soft, juicy and rich in oils. The roots distribute rapidly and extensively, providing a non-leguminous nitrogen fixation role in surrounding soils. Only the female plants will produce the orange berries. Our plants come from seeds so we don't know if they are male or female until they reach maturity to bear fruits some years after planting them.

Hippophae, the sea buckthorns, are deciduous shrubs in the family Elaeagnaceae. The name sea buckthorn may be hyphenated to avoid confusion with the buckthorns (Rhamnus, family Rhamnaceae). It is also referred to as sandthorn, sallowthorn, or seaberry. Seven species are recognized, two of them probably of hybrid origin, native over a wide area of Europe and Asia.

Hippophae rhamnoides, the common sea buckthorn, is by far the most widespread of the species in the genus, with the ranges of its eight subspecies extending from the Atlantic coasts of Europe across to northwestern Mongolia and northwestern China. In western Europe, it is largely confined to sea coasts where salt spray off the sea prevents other larger plants from outcompeting it, but in central Asia, it is more widespread in dry semidesert sites where other plants cannot survive the dry conditions. In central Europe and Asia, it also occurs as a subalpine shrub above tree line in mountains, and other sunny areas such as river banks. They are tolerant of salt in the air and soil, but demand full sunlight for good growth and do not tolerate shady conditions near larger trees. They typically grow in dry, sandy areas. Sea buckthorn hardiness zones are approximately 3 through 7. The shrubs reach 0.5–6 metres (1.6–19.7 ft) tall, rarely up to 10 metres (33 ft) in central Asia. The leaf arrangement can be alternate, or opposite.

Common sea buckthorn has branches that are dense and stiff, and very thorny. The leaves are a distinct pale silvery-green, lanceolate, 3–8 centimetres (1.2–3.1 in) long and less than 7 millimetres (0.28 in) broad. It is dioecious, with separate male and female plants. The male produces brownish flowers which produce wind-distributed pollen. The female plants produce orange berries 6–9 millimetres (0.24–0.35 in) in diameter, soft, juicy and rich in oils. The roots distribute rapidly and extensively, providing a non-leguminous nitrogen fixation role in surrounding soils. Only the female plants will produce the orange berries. Our plants come from seeds so we don't know if they are male or female until they reach maturity to bear fruits some years after planting them.

silver buffaloberry (Shepherdia argentea) silver buffaloberry (Shepherdia argentea)
silver buffaloberry (Shepherdia argentea)

Shepherdia, commonly called buffaloberry or bullberry, is a genus of small shrubs in the Elaeagnaceae family. The plants are native to northern and western North America. They are non-legume nitrogen fixers. The plant is a deciduous shrub found in open forests and thickets. The shrub reaches a height of 1–4 m (3.3–13.1 ft)

The genus has three species

Shepherdia argentea — silver buffaloberry
Shepherdia canadensis — Canada buffaloberry
Shepherdia rotundifolia — roundleaf buffaloberry, endemic to southern Utah and northern Arizona

Fruit

The berry is recognizable by being a dark shade of red, with little white dots on them. They are rough to the touch, and are found on both trees and shrubs.

Wildlife

The plants have rather bitter-tasting berries. The fruit are often eaten by bears, which by legend, prefer the berries to maintain fat stores during hibernation.

Buffaloberries are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species, including the engrailed moth (recorded from S. canadensis) and Coleophora elaeagnisella.

Culinary

Buffaloberries are edible by humans. They are quite sour, and afterwards leave the mouth a little dry. A touch of frost sweetens the berries. They can be made into jelly, jam, or syrup, soups, or prepared like cranberry sauce from berries.

http://www.businessinsider.com/buffaloberry-is-the-new-superfruit-2013-11

 

Shepherdia, commonly called buffaloberry or bullberry, is a genus of small shrubs in the Elaeagnaceae family. The plants are native to northern and western North America. They are non-legume nitrogen fixers. The plant is a deciduous shrub found in open forests and thickets. The shrub reaches a height of 1–4 m (3.3–13.1 ft)

The genus has three species

Shepherdia argentea — silver buffaloberry
Shepherdia canadensis — Canada buffaloberry
Shepherdia rotundifolia — roundleaf buffaloberry, endemic to southern Utah and northern Arizona

Fruit

The berry is recognizable by being a dark shade of red, with little white dots on them. They are rough to the touch, and are found on both trees and shrubs.

Wildlife

The plants have rather bitter-tasting berries. The fruit are often eaten by bears, which by legend, prefer the berries to maintain fat stores during hibernation.

Buffaloberries are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species, including the engrailed moth (recorded from S. canadensis) and Coleophora elaeagnisella.

Culinary

Buffaloberries are edible by humans. They are quite sour, and afterwards leave the mouth a little dry. A touch of frost sweetens the berries. They can be made into jelly, jam, or syrup, soups, or prepared like cranberry sauce from berries.

http://www.businessinsider.com/buffaloberry-is-the-new-superfruit-2013-11

 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
smooth shadbush or Allegheny serviceberry (amelanchier laevis) smooth shadbush or Allegheny serviceberry (amelanchier laevis)
smooth shadbush or Allegheny serviceberry (amelanchier laevis)

Amelanchier laevis (commonly known as the smooth shadbush or Allegheny serviceberry) is a North American species of trees in the rose family, growing up to 9 metres (30 ft) tall. It is native to eastern Canada and the eastern United States, from Newfoundland west to Ontario, Minnesota, and Iowa, south as far as Georgia and Alabama. Amelanchier laevis has stems of 1–15 metres (3 ft 3 in–49 ft 3 in) or 2–17 metres (6 ft 7 in–55 ft 9 in) which are growing in small clumps. Its petioles are 12–25 millimetres (0.47–0.98 in) with green blades which are elliptic and almost ovate. The leaves have 12–17 lateral veins and 6-8 teeth per cm. The fruit, which are pomes, are edible and can be eaten raw or cooked. The fruit has a sweet flavor. The bark can be made into a herbal medicine for expectant mothers. It is a deciduous tree. It is cultivated as an ornamental shrub.

Amelanchier laevis (commonly known as the smooth shadbush or Allegheny serviceberry) is a North American species of trees in the rose family, growing up to 9 metres (30 ft) tall. It is native to eastern Canada and the eastern United States, from Newfoundland west to Ontario, Minnesota, and Iowa, south as far as Georgia and Alabama. Amelanchier laevis has stems of 1–15 metres (3 ft 3 in–49 ft 3 in) or 2–17 metres (6 ft 7 in–55 ft 9 in) which are growing in small clumps. Its petioles are 12–25 millimetres (0.47–0.98 in) with green blades which are elliptic and almost ovate. The leaves have 12–17 lateral veins and 6-8 teeth per cm. The fruit, which are pomes, are edible and can be eaten raw or cooked. The fruit has a sweet flavor. The bark can be made into a herbal medicine for expectant mothers. It is a deciduous tree. It is cultivated as an ornamental shrub.

Strawberry 'Fort Laramie'
Strawberry 'Fort Laramie'

With 'Fort Laramie' strawberries you'll harvest your first berries this very summer! And what berries – HUGE, bright, scarlet-red berries with pink to scarlet color right to the core. Makes your mouth water just to smell their heavenly aromatic fragrance, and your taste buds tingle as you enjoy their sweet, delicious taste. 'Ft. Laramie' has good texture and excellent yields. It is easily planted into bedding packs and also works well in hanging baskets. Three weeks bench time and works best in colder areas of USA and Canada. This is the hardiest everbearer, super-sturdy strain that thrives in all parts of the country and withstands the worst winters without mulch. Ft. Laramie is an everbearing cultivar that produces a constant supply of berries throughout the growing season. Produces runners and bright red berries bursting with juice with a fresh honey-sweet flavor. Self-pollinating.

With 'Fort Laramie' strawberries you'll harvest your first berries this very summer! And what berries – HUGE, bright, scarlet-red berries with pink to scarlet color right to the core. Makes your mouth water just to smell their heavenly aromatic fragrance, and your taste buds tingle as you enjoy their sweet, delicious taste. 'Ft. Laramie' has good texture and excellent yields. It is easily planted into bedding packs and also works well in hanging baskets. Three weeks bench time and works best in colder areas of USA and Canada. This is the hardiest everbearer, super-sturdy strain that thrives in all parts of the country and withstands the worst winters without mulch. Ft. Laramie is an everbearing cultivar that produces a constant supply of berries throughout the growing season. Produces runners and bright red berries bursting with juice with a fresh honey-sweet flavor. Self-pollinating.

Strawberry 'Kent'
Strawberry 'Kent'

Mid-Season

Kent is a vigorous mid-season variety which produces high yields of bright red fruit. These large, delicious red berries are as juicy as they come. The perfect variety for eating fresh, freezing and for jams. Kent has been a long time favourite of both home and commercial growers.

The berry crop that no garden should be without. Nothing compares to the flavour of the first strawberries picked fresh out of the garden. Produces fruit in second year. Strawberries are planted 12-18” apart, in rows 4 feet apart and are hardy to zone 2 if covered.

Mid-Season

Kent is a vigorous mid-season variety which produces high yields of bright red fruit. These large, delicious red berries are as juicy as they come. The perfect variety for eating fresh, freezing and for jams. Kent has been a long time favourite of both home and commercial growers.

The berry crop that no garden should be without. Nothing compares to the flavour of the first strawberries picked fresh out of the garden. Produces fruit in second year. Strawberries are planted 12-18” apart, in rows 4 feet apart and are hardy to zone 2 if covered.

Strawberry 'Seascape'
Strawberry 'Seascape'

Seascape was released by the University of California breeding program in 1992. This day-neutral has been highly successful for north eastern growers for summer and fall production.  The plants have the potential to be the most productive of any day-neutral.  The berries are large, firm and have good flavor when picked ripe from the plant.  Seascape is considered by our customers to have the best flavor of any of our everbearers.

Seascape was released by the University of California breeding program in 1992. This day-neutral has been highly successful for north eastern growers for summer and fall production.  The plants have the potential to be the most productive of any day-neutral.  The berries are large, firm and have good flavor when picked ripe from the plant.  Seascape is considered by our customers to have the best flavor of any of our everbearers.

Strawberry 'Tristar'
Strawberry 'Tristar'
Sweet cherry lapin, (prunus avium) Sweet cherry lapin, (prunus avium)
Sweet cherry lapin, (prunus avium)

It's self-pollinating, it's hardy, and it's delicious

Most cherry lovers would agree it's hard to improve on a good 'Bing', but that's precisely what the breeders have done at the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre in Summerland, British Columbia. Breeders crossed 'Van' and 'Stella' cherries and came up with 'Lapins', a self-pollinating variety that produces large crops of delicious dark fruit that often measure almost 1 inch in width. The fruit resists splitting, and its texture is somewhat firmer than 'Bing'. 'Lapins' is a late-maturing cherry, with harvest time around late June and early July.

Growers have found 'Lapins' to be as hardy as 'Bing', down to -4°F or -20°C. On standard rootstock, this tree can reach 15 feet wide and 40 feet tall, but it should be pruned to keep it under 20 feet tall.

It's self-pollinating, it's hardy, and it's delicious

Most cherry lovers would agree it's hard to improve on a good 'Bing', but that's precisely what the breeders have done at the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre in Summerland, British Columbia. Breeders crossed 'Van' and 'Stella' cherries and came up with 'Lapins', a self-pollinating variety that produces large crops of delicious dark fruit that often measure almost 1 inch in width. The fruit resists splitting, and its texture is somewhat firmer than 'Bing'. 'Lapins' is a late-maturing cherry, with harvest time around late June and early July.

Growers have found 'Lapins' to be as hardy as 'Bing', down to -4°F or -20°C. On standard rootstock, this tree can reach 15 feet wide and 40 feet tall, but it should be pruned to keep it under 20 feet tall.

sweet cherry Mazzard (prunus avium) sweet cherry Mazzard (prunus avium)
sweet cherry Mazzard (prunus avium)

'Mazzard' has been used to refer to a selected self-fertile cultivar that comes true from seed, and which is used as a seedling rootstock for fruiting cultivars. It is hardier than the real cultivars and probably hardy to zone 4b. It will produce medium to large size sweet cherry but because it is a seedlings, it is uncertain what type of cherry you will have. If you wish to produce sweet cherry in cold zone, you have to select this one because the true cultivars don't do really well in zone 4b.

'Mazzard' has been used to refer to a selected self-fertile cultivar that comes true from seed, and which is used as a seedling rootstock for fruiting cultivars. It is hardier than the real cultivars and probably hardy to zone 4b. It will produce medium to large size sweet cherry but because it is a seedlings, it is uncertain what type of cherry you will have. If you wish to produce sweet cherry in cold zone, you have to select this one because the true cultivars don't do really well in zone 4b.

Sizes:
Sweet cherry Stella, (prunus avium) Sweet cherry Stella, (prunus avium)
Sweet cherry Stella, (prunus avium)

Available in 2018

Sweet and productive and a selffertile cultivar of cherry tree. This tree bears plump, bold-red cherries that will have fruit lovers rejoicing! Grow abundant crops of heart-shaped fruit: a healthy go-to for fresh snacks. Also suitable for canning, freezing, and drying to enjoy later. Resists cracking. Developed in Summerland, British Columbia and introduced in 1968. Ripens in late june. Self-pollinating. Suitable for zone 5a minimum. Can be grown in a big pot or in a temporary hole and laid down to the ground during winter.

Available in 2018

Sweet and productive and a selffertile cultivar of cherry tree. This tree bears plump, bold-red cherries that will have fruit lovers rejoicing! Grow abundant crops of heart-shaped fruit: a healthy go-to for fresh snacks. Also suitable for canning, freezing, and drying to enjoy later. Resists cracking. Developed in Summerland, British Columbia and introduced in 1968. Ripens in late june. Self-pollinating. Suitable for zone 5a minimum. Can be grown in a big pot or in a temporary hole and laid down to the ground during winter.

Sweetbriar rose, or eglantine (Rosa rubiginosa) Sweetbriar rose, or eglantine (Rosa rubiginosa)
Sweetbriar rose, or eglantine (Rosa rubiginosa)

Sweet briar, sweetbriar rose, sweet brier or eglantine is a species of rose native to Europe and western Asia.

It is a dense deciduous shrub 2–3 m high and across, with the stems bearing numerous hooked prickles. The foliage has a strong apple-like fragrance. The leaves are pinnate, 5–9 cm long, with 5–9 rounded to oval leaflets with a serrated margin, and numerous glandular hairs. The flowers are 1.8–3 cm diameter, the five petals being pink with a white base, and the numerous stamens yellow; the flowers are produced in clusters of 2–7 together, from late spring to mid summer. The fruit is a globose to oblong red hip 1–2 cm diameter.

Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in heavy clay soil.

Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Fruit - cooked. It is used in making jellies etc. The taste is best after a frost. The fruit is up to 25mm in diameter, but there is only a thin layer of flesh surrounding the many seeds. Some care has to be taken when eating this fruit, see the notes above on known hazards. A pleasant tasting fruity-flavoured tea is made from the fruit, it is rich in vitamin C.

Petals - raw or cooked. Remove the bitter white base. Used in confectionery.

Young shoots - raw. Used as they come through the ground in spring. The seed is a good source of vitamin E, it can be ground into a powder and mixed with flour or added to other foods as a supplement. Be sure to remove the seed hairs.


 

Sweet briar, sweetbriar rose, sweet brier or eglantine is a species of rose native to Europe and western Asia.

It is a dense deciduous shrub 2–3 m high and across, with the stems bearing numerous hooked prickles. The foliage has a strong apple-like fragrance. The leaves are pinnate, 5–9 cm long, with 5–9 rounded to oval leaflets with a serrated margin, and numerous glandular hairs. The flowers are 1.8–3 cm diameter, the five petals being pink with a white base, and the numerous stamens yellow; the flowers are produced in clusters of 2–7 together, from late spring to mid summer. The fruit is a globose to oblong red hip 1–2 cm diameter.

Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in heavy clay soil.

Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Fruit - cooked. It is used in making jellies etc. The taste is best after a frost. The fruit is up to 25mm in diameter, but there is only a thin layer of flesh surrounding the many seeds. Some care has to be taken when eating this fruit, see the notes above on known hazards. A pleasant tasting fruity-flavoured tea is made from the fruit, it is rich in vitamin C.

Petals - raw or cooked. Remove the bitter white base. Used in confectionery.

Young shoots - raw. Used as they come through the ground in spring. The seed is a good source of vitamin E, it can be ground into a powder and mixed with flour or added to other foods as a supplement. Be sure to remove the seed hairs.


 

Sizes:
table grape 'Brianna'
table grape 'Brianna'

Brianna produces large clusters of medium size sweet white grapes. It is very cold hardy and shows good fungal resistance. Brianna can be used as a good table grape and produces a nice white dessert wine. Wines are semi-sweet with pineapple nose and flavor.

Color: White
Primary Use: Wine
USDA Winter Hardiness: 3
Harvest Season: Mid Season
Growth Habit: Semi Upright
Vigor: Medium Vigor
Sugg. Distance Between Vines: 6 - 8 ft.
Bud Break: a few (2-3) days later than Concord
Bloom Date: a few (2-3) days earlier that Concord
Sulfur Injury: None Observed

Disease Susceptibility:

Black Rot: moderately susceptible or sensitive
Downy Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Powdery Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Botrytis: moderately susceptible or sensitive
Sulfur Sensitivity: slightly susceptible or sensitive

Brianna produces large clusters of medium size sweet white grapes. It is very cold hardy and shows good fungal resistance. Brianna can be used as a good table grape and produces a nice white dessert wine. Wines are semi-sweet with pineapple nose and flavor.

Color: White
Primary Use: Wine
USDA Winter Hardiness: 3
Harvest Season: Mid Season
Growth Habit: Semi Upright
Vigor: Medium Vigor
Sugg. Distance Between Vines: 6 - 8 ft.
Bud Break: a few (2-3) days later than Concord
Bloom Date: a few (2-3) days earlier that Concord
Sulfur Injury: None Observed

Disease Susceptibility:

Black Rot: moderately susceptible or sensitive
Downy Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Powdery Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Botrytis: moderately susceptible or sensitive
Sulfur Sensitivity: slightly susceptible or sensitive

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
table grape 'Kay Gray'
table grape 'Kay Gray'

Kay Gray is very productive and vines are disease resistant. Produces medium to large, very firm, white slipskin grapes with a mild foxy flavor. We eat the grapes as a fruit but Kay Gray can make a neutral white table wine, and is most commonly used for blending. Flavor varies depending on climate- from labrusca to fruity. The grapes contains seeds.It has a tropical fruit flavor like pineapple and passion fruits. SELF-FERTILE

Color: grey-white
Primary Use: Table,Basket,Dessert,Wine
USDA Winter Hardiness: 3
Harvest Season: Early Season
Growth Habit: Trailing
Vigor: Very Vigorous
Sugg. Distance Between Vines: 8 ft.
Bud Break: mid-season with Concord
Bloom Date: a few (2-3) days later than Concord
Sulfur Injury: Substantial Injury Observed in 2011

Disease Susceptibility:

Black Rot: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Downy Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Powdery Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Botrytis: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Sulfur Sensitivity: highly susceptible or sensitive

Kay Gray is very productive and vines are disease resistant. Produces medium to large, very firm, white slipskin grapes with a mild foxy flavor. We eat the grapes as a fruit but Kay Gray can make a neutral white table wine, and is most commonly used for blending. Flavor varies depending on climate- from labrusca to fruity. The grapes contains seeds.It has a tropical fruit flavor like pineapple and passion fruits. SELF-FERTILE

Color: grey-white
Primary Use: Table,Basket,Dessert,Wine
USDA Winter Hardiness: 3
Harvest Season: Early Season
Growth Habit: Trailing
Vigor: Very Vigorous
Sugg. Distance Between Vines: 8 ft.
Bud Break: mid-season with Concord
Bloom Date: a few (2-3) days later than Concord
Sulfur Injury: Substantial Injury Observed in 2011

Disease Susceptibility:

Black Rot: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Downy Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Powdery Mildew: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Botrytis: slightly susceptible or sensitive
Sulfur Sensitivity: highly susceptible or sensitive

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
table grape 'Somerset'
table grape 'Somerset'

SEEDLESS varieties

Medium sized, ruddy, reddish golden berries with a crispy texture and a pleasant, surprising strawberry-like flavour. This exceptional table grape makes a delectable pink juice, as well as jams and jellies. The fruit is edible at the pink stage but becomes much sweeter and more flavourful if left until fully red. Developed in Minnesota, Somerset has proven to be the most cold hardy seedless variety. Easy to grow, very good disease resistance and not excessively vigorous. Ripens 2 1/2 weeks before concord.
SELF-FERTILE
ZONE 4

SEEDLESS varieties

Medium sized, ruddy, reddish golden berries with a crispy texture and a pleasant, surprising strawberry-like flavour. This exceptional table grape makes a delectable pink juice, as well as jams and jellies. The fruit is edible at the pink stage but becomes much sweeter and more flavourful if left until fully red. Developed in Minnesota, Somerset has proven to be the most cold hardy seedless variety. Easy to grow, very good disease resistance and not excessively vigorous. Ripens 2 1/2 weeks before concord.
SELF-FERTILE
ZONE 4

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
table grape 'Swenson white'
table grape 'Swenson white'

Also known as Louise Swenson, this essentially seedless white table grape has a delicious, fruity flavor. The vine is vigorous, cold hardy and disease resistant. This grape is also used for wine production, and has a delicate aroma of flowers and honey. It is light in body and blending it with a variety such as Prairie Star makes it a more complete wine. Ripens late August into September.
Mature Height: 6-8 ft.
Hardy to -30°F or zone 4

Also known as Louise Swenson, this essentially seedless white table grape has a delicious, fruity flavor. The vine is vigorous, cold hardy and disease resistant. This grape is also used for wine production, and has a delicate aroma of flowers and honey. It is light in body and blending it with a variety such as Prairie Star makes it a more complete wine. Ripens late August into September.
Mature Height: 6-8 ft.
Hardy to -30°F or zone 4

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
table grape 'Trollhaugen'
table grape 'Trollhaugen'

SEEDLESS VARIETIES

The earliest and also the hardiest blue seedless grape, it can remain hanging on the vine for weeks after ripening without losing much quality. Medium-sized berries are exceptionally sweet with a mild Concord-like flavour. A real favorite for fresh eating, it also makes excellent raisins. Trollhaugen was introduced by Elmer Swenson, the renowned grape breeder from Wisconsin. The name reflects his Norwegian heritage. Ripens four weeks before Concord.
SELF-FERTILE
ZONE 4

SEEDLESS VARIETIES

The earliest and also the hardiest blue seedless grape, it can remain hanging on the vine for weeks after ripening without losing much quality. Medium-sized berries are exceptionally sweet with a mild Concord-like flavour. A real favorite for fresh eating, it also makes excellent raisins. Trollhaugen was introduced by Elmer Swenson, the renowned grape breeder from Wisconsin. The name reflects his Norwegian heritage. Ripens four weeks before Concord.
SELF-FERTILE
ZONE 4

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Tart cherry 'Big Late' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa) Tart cherry 'Big Late' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa)
Tart cherry 'Big Late' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa)

The big Late cultivar is used to be eaten fresh and for processing. Its performance is average and its fruit is very high calibre: 6,5 gm. This cherry variety has a very pronounced cherry taste and its flavour is well balanced for fresh consumption. This fruit shrub is the latest cultivar. Its Brix rate at maturity is 19
 

The big Late cultivar is used to be eaten fresh and for processing. Its performance is average and its fruit is very high calibre: 6,5 gm. This cherry variety has a very pronounced cherry taste and its flavour is well balanced for fresh consumption. This fruit shrub is the latest cultivar. Its Brix rate at maturity is 19
 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Tart Cherry 'Carmine Jewel' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa)
Tart Cherry 'Carmine Jewel' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa)

* Dark purple skin and flesh, small pits
* Good for fresh eating and processing, best pie cherry
* Some people prefer the extra intense flavor and tartness over the milder, sweeter varieties for fresh eating
* Fruit weighs about 4 gram, 15-17 Brix
* Early harvest, ripening first in the season, mid July in zone 3
* 6.5-12' height, 7+' width
* High suckering, can sucker up to 20' away.
* Self-pollinating
* Usually produces a few berries in 3 years, rapidly increasing to 25+ lbs 5-6 at years of age
* Zones 2-8

Source: university of Saskatchewan

http://www.fruit.usask.ca/dwarfsourcherries.html

The breeding of dwarf sour cherries began in the 1940's by Dr. Les Kerr. The past 50 years of breeding have combined cold hardiness, dwarf stature and good fruit quality into the final product. The cherry releases by the University of Saskatchewan are a great tasting cherry with a high sugar content. They also have very good potential for mechanical harvesting which is necessary for commercial fruit production.
 

 

* Dark purple skin and flesh, small pits
* Good for fresh eating and processing, best pie cherry
* Some people prefer the extra intense flavor and tartness over the milder, sweeter varieties for fresh eating
* Fruit weighs about 4 gram, 15-17 Brix
* Early harvest, ripening first in the season, mid July in zone 3
* 6.5-12' height, 7+' width
* High suckering, can sucker up to 20' away.
* Self-pollinating
* Usually produces a few berries in 3 years, rapidly increasing to 25+ lbs 5-6 at years of age
* Zones 2-8

Source: university of Saskatchewan

http://www.fruit.usask.ca/dwarfsourcherries.html

The breeding of dwarf sour cherries began in the 1940's by Dr. Les Kerr. The past 50 years of breeding have combined cold hardiness, dwarf stature and good fruit quality into the final product. The cherry releases by the University of Saskatchewan are a great tasting cherry with a high sugar content. They also have very good potential for mechanical harvesting which is necessary for commercial fruit production.
 

 

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Tart cherry 'Crimson Passion' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa)
Tart cherry 'Crimson Passion' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa)

New product.

New product.

Sizes:
Tart cherry 'Juliet' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa)
Tart cherry 'Juliet' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa)

Dark Red
Fresh eating type: excellent quality
Also good for processing
One of the best for fresh eating flavor
Most productive cultivar the last years.
Moderate vigour
Few suckers
5.0g fruit
High sugar content (up to 20 brix)
Pits are large enough for old fashioned crank pitters

more info here: http://www.fruit.usask.ca/dwarfsourcherries.html

Dark Red
Fresh eating type: excellent quality
Also good for processing
One of the best for fresh eating flavor
Most productive cultivar the last years.
Moderate vigour
Few suckers
5.0g fruit
High sugar content (up to 20 brix)
Pits are large enough for old fashioned crank pitters

more info here: http://www.fruit.usask.ca/dwarfsourcherries.html

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
Tart cherry 'Valentine' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa)
Tart cherry 'Valentine' (Prunus cerasus x P. fruticosa)

Medium Red Fruit
Tart pie cherry: Processing type
Some suckering
4.5g fruit

Medium sugar content around 15 BRIX
This cherry may be best for making pies with no dyes needed

http://www.fruit.usask.ca/dwarfsourcherries.html

Medium Red Fruit
Tart pie cherry: Processing type
Some suckering
4.5g fruit

Medium sugar content around 15 BRIX
This cherry may be best for making pies with no dyes needed

http://www.fruit.usask.ca/dwarfsourcherries.html

Sizes:
* A discount is automatically applied if 10 or more trees are ordered:
10 to 24 = 10%
25 to 49 = 15%
50 to 99 = 20%
100 to 250 = 25%
250 and more = 35%
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